US: “George Stinney the `Boy of 14 Executed 70 Years Ago’ May Get Another Day in Court”


#AceNewsServices says some of you may remember this case which l highlighted on “AceHistoryNews”  on the “Miranda Rights” and the fact he was not protected.

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Extract of Original Post: 

“In a South Carolina prison on June 16, 1944, guards walked a 14-year-old Black boy, bible tucked under his arm, to theelectric chair. He used the bible as a booster seat. At 5′ 1″ and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg. The switch was pulled, and the adult sized death mask fell from his face. Tears streamed from his wide-open, tearful eyes, and saliva dripped from his mouth. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the execution of the youngest person in the United States in the past century.

George Stinney was accused of killing two White girls, 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and 8-year-old Mary Emma Thames. Because there were no Miranda rights in 1944, Stinney was questioned without a lawyer and his parents were not allowed into the room. The sheriff when said that Stinney admitted to the killings, but there is only his word — no written record of the confession has been found. Reports even said that the officers offered Stinney ice cream for confessing to the crimes.

'Old Sparky' is the electric chair that Nebras...

‘Old Sparky’ is the electric chair that Nebraska used for executions. It is housed in the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, Nebraska (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Latest Good News: 

(COLUMBIA, S.C.) — A 14-year-old boy executed by South Carolina nearly 70 years ago is finally getting another day in court.

Supporters of George Stinney plan to argue Tuesday that there wasn’t enough evidence to find him guilty in 1944 of killing a 7-year-old and an 11-year-old girl. The black teen was found guilty of killing the white girls in a trial that lasted less than a day in the tiny Southern mill town of Alcolu, separated, as most were in those days, by race.

Nearly all the evidence, including a confession that was central to the case against Stinney, has disappeared, along with the transcript of the trial. Lawyers working on behalf of Stinney’s family have sworn statements from his relatives accounting for his time the day the girls were killed, from a cell-mate saying he never confessed to the crime and from a pathologist disputing the findings of the autopsy done on the victims.

The novel decision whether to give an executed man a new trial will be in the hands of Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen. Experts say it is a longshot. South Carolina law has a high bar for new trials based on evidence that could have been discovered at the time of the trial. Also, the legal system in the state before segregation often found defendants guilty with evidence that would be considered scant today. If Mullen finds in favor of Stinney, it could open the door for hundreds of other appeals.

But the Stinney case is unique in one way. At 14, he’s the youngest person executed in the United States in the past 100 years. Even in 1944, there was an outcry over putting someone so young in the electric chair. Newspaper accounts said the straps in the chair didn’t fit around his 95-pound body and an electrode was too big for his leg.

Stinney’s supporters said racism, common in the Jim Crow era South, meant deputies in Clarendon County did little investigation after they decided Stinney was the prime suspect. They said he was pulled from his parents and interrogated without a lawyer.

School board member George Frierson heard stories about Stinney growing up in the same mill town and has spent a decade fighting to get him exonerated. He swallowed hard as he said he hardly slept before the day he has waited 10 years to see.

“Somebody that didn’t kill someone is finally getting his day in court,” Frierson said.

Back in 1944, Stinney was likely the only black person in the courtroom during his one-day trial. On Tuesday, the prosecutor arguing against him will be Ernest “Chip” Finney III, the son of South Carolina’s first black Chief Justice. Finney said last month he won’t preset any evidence against Stinney at the hearing, but if a new trial is granted, he will ask for time to conduct a new investigation.

What that investigation might find is not known. South Carolina did not have a statewide law enforcement unit to help smaller jurisdictions until 1947. Newspaper stories about Stinney’s trial offer little clue whether any evidence was introduced beyond the teen’s confession and an autopsy report. Some people around Alcolu said bloody clothes were taken from Stinney’s home, but never introduced at trial because of his confession. No record of those clothes exists.

Relatives of one of the girls killed, 11-year-old Betty Binnicker, have recently spoke out as well, saying Stinney was known around town as a bully who threatened to fight or kill people who came too close to the grass where he grazed the family cow.

It isn’t known if the judge will rule Tuesday, or take time to come to her decision. Stinney’s supporters said if the motion for a new trial fails, they will ask the state to pardon him.

 

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“Trial By Jury: An Essential Safeguard For A Free Society”


Originally posted on Ace History 2 Research News :

#AceHistoryNews says about two centuries ago Thomas Jefferson said “I consider Trial by Jury as the only anchor yet imagined by man, by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution”.

"Thomas Jefferson"We live at a time in which we have the potential to learn perhaps more from history than did our ancestors, but it seems that though technology and information have increased, our memories have only grown shorter; we have forgotten the value of those fundamentals that preserve liberty and justice.

One such fundamental is that sovereignty[1] resides in the people. This being the case we can say that the people are masters of their own governments and thus superior to them; they are the creator, the government the created. A corollary of this superiority is that people have the rightful power to check[2] their own government, to keep it within the bounds of what is…

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#AceNewsGroup says to All its Readers “Thank You for 1000 Likes on Our Posts”


WP Like Button#AceNewsGroup says today marks another milestone for our group and it is all thanks to you the readers kind support and all your likes, as we have reached 1000 and we could not do it without your support.

So all l can say is a great big thank you from the Ace News GroupThanks in all languages   

 

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How to Spend a Weekend Brushing up on Nicaraguan History – Well Then Ask Ambassadors Chris and Sharon Campbell


A pre-columbian vessel

A pre-columbian vessel

Chris and Sharon truly enjoyed exploring this eco-tourism gem and received quite a surprise upon their visit to the museum. Among the pre-Columbian artefacts was a vessel dating from 300BC-500AD, with what appeared to be a Union Jack design on the front!

Indigeneous art from Ometepe

Ometepe is home to impressive indigeneous art.

This mystical island, with its petroglyphs, rock carvings and fascinating culture, was well worth the visit.