‘SAMSUNG SMART TV’S RECORD PERSONAL CONVERSATIONS & SENDS THEM TO THIRD PARTIES ‘


#AceNewsServices – November 03 – October Samsung’s Company’s new privacy policy causes consternation. 

by PAUL JOSEPH WATSON | NOVEMBER 3, 2014


' SAMSUNG ‘SMART TV’ RECORDS “PERSONAL” CONVERSATIONS & SENDS THEM TO THIRD PARTIES '

‘ SAMSUNG ‘SMART TV’ RECORDS “PERSONAL” CONVERSATIONS & SENDS THEM TO THIRD PARTIES ‘

Samsung’s new global privacy policy for its line of Smart TVs states that a user’s personal conversations will be recorded by the device’s microphone and transmitted to third parties. 

A 46-page privacy policy which is now included in all newly purchased Samsung Smart TVs states that voice recognition technology “may capture voice commands and associated texts” in order to “improve the features” of the system.

The policy, a summary of which is also posted online, ominously advises users to, “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party through your use of Voice Recognition.”

Writing about the privacy policy for Salon.com, Michael Price, counsel in the Liberty and National Security Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, said he was now “terrified” of his new TV, noting that voice recognition is just one feature that could be used to spy on users.

The television also logs website visits, has a built-in camera for facial recognition and uses tracking cookies to detect “when you have viewed particular content or a particular email message.”

“I do not doubt that this data is important to providing customized content and convenience, but it is also incredibly personal, constitutionally protected information that should not be for sale to advertisers and should require a warrant for law enforcement to access,writes Price, adding that current privacy laws offer little protection against “third party” data.

Price also draws attention to comments made in 2012 by former CIA director David Petraeus, who hailed the “Internet of things” as a transformational boon for “clandestine tradecraft”. In other words, it will soon be easier than ever before to keep tabs on the population since everything they use will be connected to the web, with total disregard for privacy considerations.

The spooks won’t have to plant a bug in your home or your vehicle, you will be doing it for them.

As we have documented, the Internet of things is the process of manufacturing every new product with a system that broadcasts wirelessly via the world wide web, allowing industry and the government to spy ubiquitously on every aspect of your existence.

In recording private conversations for potential third party use, Samsung is merely mimicking what games console makers have done for years.

Since its launch in 2010, Microsoft’s X-Box Kinect games device has a video camera and a microphone that records speech. The company informs its users that they “should not expect any level of privacy concerning your use of the live communication features,” while Microsoft also “may access or disclose information about you, including the content of your communications.”

Last year, Microsoft was forced to deny claims that the Xbox One’s Kinect camera could see gamers’ genitals after video footage emerged which suggested the device’s IR camera was so sophisticated that it could capture the outline of a user’s penis.

Gamers also complained that Kinect was monitoring their Skype conversations for swearing and then punishing them with account bans.

With Christmas fast approaching, millions more people will splash the cash on games consoles and smart TVs completely oblivious to the fact that they are paying to have their private conversations recorded and potentially transmitted to third parties.

Source:InfoWars

#ANS2014

Facebook: “Facing a Lawsuit over False Likes”


#AceMedaiNews says according to #MediaSources the question being asked is ……… did Facebook user Anthony Ditirro like the USA Today Facebook page, or didn’t he? Perhaps the answer will emerge during court proceedings, as the Colorado resident filed a lawsuit against the social network, seeking class-action status, and claiming that Facebook falsified likes for advertising purposes, CNET reported. According to the suit, as reported by CNET, Ditirro appeared in at least one sponsored story, brought to his attention by one of his friends.

UK:Diwali Video Message from Nick Clegg


Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg‘s video message to mark Diwali 2013.

A transcript of the video message is below:

Across Britain, it’s that time again when the dark nights of winter are lit up with the bright lights of Diwali.

And I would like to wish everyone taking part in these celebrations, both in this country and around the world, a happy Diwali and a prosperous new year.

One of the most important dates in the Hindu calendar, Diwali is a festival that marks the triumph of good over evil and light over darkness. And it has become the focus of joyous celebrations in many of our local communities, with people of all faiths and none, coming together for dancing, music and fireworks.

These festivities represent some of the biggest Diwali celebrations to be found outside of India, and reflect the powerful and ongoing contribution of Britain’s Hindu, Sikh, Jain and Buddhist communities to every area of our national life.

So whether you’re at home with family and friends, or you’ve been taking part in Diwali events on the Belgrave Road in Leicester, in Trafalgar Square, or elsewhere in the United Kingdom – wherever you are and whatever your faith – have a wonderful time.

 

Live webcasts of His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s four day teaching on Nagarjuna’s “Sixty Stanzas of Reasoning”


There will be live webcasts of His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s four-day teaching on Nagarjuna’s “Sixty Stanzas of Reasoning” & Tsongkhapa’s “Concise Treatises on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment” at the request of a group from Taiwan at the Main Tibetan Temple in Dharamsala, India, on September 30th to October 3rd, 2013. His Holiness will speak in Tibetan with English, Chinese, Vietnamese and Russian language translations are available. Live webcasts can be viewed at http://dalailama.com/livewebAll times Indian Standard Time (IST = GMT+5.30)September 30th: 8:00am – 12:00noon IST
October 1st: 8:00am – 12:00noon IST
October 2nd: 8:00am – 12:00noon IST
October 3rd: 8:00am – 12:00noon ISTFor times in your region 8:00am IST on September 30th in Dharamsala, India is the same as 3:30am BST on September 30th in London, England; and 7:30pm PDT on September 29th in Los Angeles, California, USA.

Photo of His Holiness the Dalai Lama speaking at a question and answer session during teachings requested by a group of Buddhists from Taiwan at the Main Tibetan Temple in Dharamsala, India on October 4, 2012. (Photo by Tenzin Choejor/OHHDL)

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Death at School:Parents Protest Dangerous Discipline Video


Español: Logo Vectorial de YouTube

Español: Logo Vectorial de YouTube (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I saw this video today on YouTube and just had to provide a post, about the discipline applied in certain schools in the US and before you watch ,it is very graphic and may upset certain people!

The fact that “Special Needs Children” are being locked up for hours on end to be able to teach them a lesson, defies all morality!

Something Sickening Is Happening To Some Of Our Schoolchildren.

I have a ginormous soapbox I wanna get up on right now. Watch this and then do some of your own research. What you’ll find will probably be appalling.

At 5:06, the kids themselves describe their own experiences. That should be all you need to hear to understand something is seriously wrong here.

WARNING: This video includes disturbing scenes involving children.

Alana Karsch

Alana KarschMore from Alana »

 

Speech on Building a new international consensus on the future of Cyberspace


English: William Hague at the U.S. Deptartment...

English: William Hague at the U.S. Deptartment of State (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Foreign Secretary William Hague calls for countries to discuss collectively one of the greatest challenges facing our generation.

I thank President Park and the government of Korea for hosting this important conference and for organising it brilliantly well.

We are two years into a process that began in London in 2011 to address one of the greatest challenges facing our generation: building a new international consensus on the future of cyberspace. There is more that unites us as nations than divides us on this issue. We all want to benefit from secure and reliable access to the internet as a driver of growth, development, good governance and innovation in our societies, and to protect our citizens from crime and terrorism on-line.

But there is a divide emerging in the international community that we must confront.

On one side are countries like the UK and many others like Korea who argue that the internet must remain open and borderless, and benefit from collective oversight between governments, international organisations, industry and civil society. In our view this is the only way to ensure that the benefits of the digital age are expanded to all countries; that ingenuity and competition flourish and investment and enterprise are rewarded; and that the creativity that spurs economic growth is nurtured not stifled by excessive regulation.

On the other side are countries calling for an international legal framework for the internet that would enable governments to exercise exclusive control over the Internet’s content and resources.

I am convinced that placing the controls of cyberspace entirely in the hands of governments would be a drastic error that would have profound social and economic consequences. The dead hand of state control would be as stifling for the internet as it has been for many economies in the past. It would erect barriers that impede the free flow of ideas, and would lead to a ghettoized or two-tier cyberspace that hinders free trade and holds back economic growth and development. This world of closed, fragmented Internets would certainly be less free and democratic – but it would also be less creative, less innovative, less progressive and, ultimately, less prosperous than a world with a single and open Internet.

The Internet is the heartbeat of the global economy, linking businesses that are based thousands of miles apart and constantly creating new markets, industries and technologies. Over the last 5 years, it has accounted for one fifth of GDP growth in advanced economies, with vast potential for future growth in countries where many people are now coming online for the first time.

It provides an environment where ideas flourish and barriers to market entry are removed, enabling innovators and entrepreneurs in every corner of the globe to turn those bright ideas into financial gain. It is improving the delivery of public services such as health and education, which heighten the skill and efficiency of workforces the world over.

It is facilitating the development of smart grids, smart buildings and smart cities, which support green and sustainable growth.

And it is creating more attractive investment climates by widening accountability and increasing transparency.

For these reasons, and more, societies that embrace an open and vibrant internet will be the ones that develop and prosper most in the 21st century.

And let us be clear – human rights apply online as much as they do offline. We should have no illusions about the motivation of those who call for a regulated internet stem from a desire to control the expression and curtail the political freedoms of their citizens.

We do all face sophisticated and persistent threats in cyberspace from terrorists or organised criminals. We will not compromise on the United Kingdom’s security or give free rein in cyberspace to those who wish to harm our country. With my full support our security and intelligence agencies will continue to address threats in cyberspace and to help our allies and partners to do the same – and the UK will remain at the centre of the debate on how we tackle those threats more effectively. But countries who seek to hide behind firewalls and erect artificial barriers on the internet will ultimately reduce their security, not enhance it. A fragmented Cyberspace would reduce trust and cooperation, making malicious or subversive activity more likely and harder to detect.

So our challenge is to work together to build confidence and engrain norms of behaviour which govern state behaviour online and support our collective security, while upholding the values of openness and freedom which have been integral to the success of the internet and are our core values as democratic nations.

We need a more transparent and inclusive model of governance; one where no single body controls all of the functions that govern the Internet; which is flexible, adaptable and can keep pace with the lightning speeds at which technology is advancing.

The London process, a process that began two years ago, is designed to achieve that objective and we have made some important progress:

We have brought the debate on the future of cyberspace to the front of the international agenda. We have taken strides towards agreeing principles that can form the basis of widely accepted norms for behaviour in cyberspace, which are captured in the “principles and guidelines” document put forward by Korean hosts. And we are making progress on capacity building to help all states tackle challenges in cyberspace. In the UK, this includes the establishment of the Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre which will open in Oxford next month and help other countries to build their own resilience and security.

Nevertheless, we have still not reached agreement on international ‘rules of the road’ or set of standards of behaviour.

To all those states that are uncertain where their interests lie between these competing visions of the future of cyberspace, I say that there is no stark choice between an open Internet and a secure Internet. But there is a choice between an Internet which continues to create growth and prosperity on all continents, and one which does not. We must agree to take steps to increase the confidence and trust that governments, companies and citizens all have in the Internet while preserving its transformative dynamism and creativity.

At a time of such global economic uncertainty, making the wrong choice would have profound consequences for the future. We must come together and ensure that the Internet is not only secure, but remains an engine for progress all over the world.

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#Edward-Snowden – Receives Sam Adam Award in Moscow


FIRST VIDEO: Snowden receives Sam Adams Award in Moscow

Published time: October 11, 2013 23:55
Edited time: October 12, 2013 18:09

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The first videos of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden have surfaced since he received asylum in Russia. The footage, provided by WikiLeaks, was taken during the Sam Adams Associates for Integrity in Intelligence awards ceremony.

The video fragments of a meeting, attended by the former CIA analyst Ray McGovern, former NSA executive Thomas Andrews Drake and former FBI agent Coleen Rowley, Jesselyn Radack of the Government Accountability Project, and Sarah Harrison of WikiLeaks – all whistleblowers in their own respects – were released by WikiLeaks on Friday.

In the first video appearance since he was granted asylum in Russia, Snowden spoke about US government transparency and dangers to democracy caused by the NSA mass spying programs.

“This is not about any sort of particular program, this is about a trend in the relationship between the governing and the governed in America,” Snowden said speaking about the government transparency situation in the US. “That is increasingly coming into conflict with what we expect as a free and democratic people. If we can’t understand the policies and the programs of our government, we cannot grant our consent in regulating them.”

“As someone very clever said recently, we don’t have an oversight problem in the US we have an undersight problem.”

The problem has grown up to a point where Americans have “an executive, the Department of Justice, that’s unwilling to prosecute high officials who lied to Congress and the country on camera but they’ll stop at nothing to prosecute someone who told them the truth,” Snowden added.