#AceHistoryNews says my latest post for New…

#AceHistoryNews says my latest post for “New Years Eve and New years Day” and here is a small extract of both.

New Year’s Eve is December 31 of every year. It is celebrated in countries that use the Gregorian calendar with the United States, Australia, British Isles, North & South America, Europe, Scandinavia and (the former) Soviet Union as the main regions in the world who welcome in a new year.
It is exactly at the stroke of midnight on December 31 of the current year that marks the transition to the New Year ahead. Celebrations may be wild parties or solemn times of prayer. Some participants will dress up in silly outfits and wear comical hats, drink champagne (or other liquors of their choice) and use traditional items called “noise makers” to express their joy and hope for the new year ahead. Unfortunately, with some people this celebratory behaviour gets taken a bit too far. Some people have been known to make improper advances to co-workers at parties, throw their arms around total strangers on the streets or in crowds and well perhaps to other things that would be considered totally unacceptable any other day of the year.

New Years Day January 1st is considered New Years Day in today’s society. But this is a new concept because up until the time of Julius Caesar, the Romans celebrated the New Year in March because it was the first month in the Roman calendar. However, January 1 marked the time when the Romans changed their governmental figures and new consuls were inducted into office. And, they had games and feasting to help celebrate the new officials. But, they still used March 1 as their official mark of the new year and had a festival to their god, Mars (God of War).

It was Caesar who changed the Roman New Year’s Day to January 1 in honour of Janus, (God of all beginnings and gate-keeper of heaven and earth). Janus was always depicted with two faces: One looking back to the old year (past) and one looking ahead to the new year (future). One of the customs in the festival honouring Janus was to exchange gifts and then make resolutions to be friendly and good to one another.

Read More: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/tradition-of-new-years-eve-and-new-years-day/

#happynewyear2014, #god, #janus, #new-years-day, #new-years-eve, #roman