` War Means Many Dollars for Western Economies But For People it Means No Bread to Feed Their Children’

#AceNewsServices – JORDAN – April 17 – Amman, Jordan – Three years after fleeing their war-torn country, more than half a million Syrian refugees living in Jordan’s urban centres have become more vulnerable and destitute, a new study has revealed.

A household assessment released by CARE International on Thursday found that urban Syrian refugees are struggling to cope with inadequate housing and high debts amid increasing prices in Jordan.

According the latest report of CARE releases new study on situation of urban refugees: http://care-international.org/UploadDocument/files/CARE_Syrian%20refugee%20Assessment%20in%20Jordan_April%202014.pdf

Amman, April 15, 2014. Half a million Syrian refugees living in urban areas in Jordan are struggling more than ever to cope with inadequate housing, high debts, rising costs of living and educational challenges for their children, CARE International has found in a new study.

According to CARE’s household assessment of more than 2,200 Syrian refugees, 90 percent of the refugees are living in debt to relatives, landlords, shopkeepers and neighbours and rents have increased by almost a third in the past year.

The insecurity to provide for their families causes increasing levels of stress and sets women at risk of sexual exploitation. In many cases, young sons become the family’s breadwinner to make ends meet. CARE’s study shows that only 52 percent of Syrian refugee boys are currently attending school (compared with 62 percent of girls). This is an improvement to CARE’s findings in last year’s urban assessments, where 40 percent of children were enrolled in school. “But the current number is still too low. Being pulled into the workforce usually means being pulled out of school. Hundreds of thousands of school children have lost up to three years of education. We are losing an entire generation of children, the most critical investment for Syria’s future.”

“Three years after the Syria crisis started refugee families are becoming more and more destitute. The longer they live in neighbouring countries, the more financially vulnerable they become. Families have fled months or years ago, they do not have any savings any more,” says Salam Kanaan, CARE Jordan’s Country Director. More than 80 percent of the refugees in Jordan do not live in camps, but in poor neighbourhoods in the urban areas or the outskirts of Jordan’s cities, often in inadequate dwellings, informal tented settlements and makeshift shelters.

Often they have to share tiny, run-down flats with more than one family. Families have to spend an average of USD 260 per month for rent. For refugees, who have difficulties and high expenses obtaining a work permit in Jordan, being able to pay for rent is one of the most pressing concerns.

36 percent of the families registered with CARE are headed by women. They have fled without their husbands who are either still in Syria, injured or have been killed.

They have to take care of their young children and older relatives, but have difficulties to generate income.

Read More: http://care-international.org/news/press-releases/emergency-response/urban-syrian-refugees-struggle-to-make-ends-meet-in-jordan.aspx#.U00edvl_udQ

#ANS2014

#syrian, #care, #jordan