‘ Happy Independence Day to All My American Readers and Followers this is Just for You ‘

#AceHistoryNews – UNITED STATES – July 04 – Variously known as the Fourth of July and Independence Day, July 4th has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution (1775-83).

​In June 1776, representatives of the 13 colonies then fighting in the revolutionary struggle weighed a resolution that would declare their independence from Great Britain. On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favour of independence, and two days later its delegates adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson.

​From 1776 until the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with typical festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues.

​THE BIRTH OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE

When the initial battles in the Revolutionary War broke out in April 1775, few colonists desired complete independence from Great Britain, and those who did were considered radical. By the middle of the following year, however, many more colonists had come to favour independence, thanks to growing hostility against Britain and the spread of revolutionary sentiments such as those expressed in Thomas Paine’s best-selling pamphlet “Common Sense,” published in early 1776.


​On June 7, when the Continental Congress met at the PennsylvaniaState House (later Independence Hall) in Philadelphia, the Virginia delegate Richard Henry Lee introduced a motion calling for the colonies’ independence. Amid heated debate, Congress postponed the vote on Lee’s resolution, but appointed a five-man committee–including Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, John Adams of Massachusetts, Roger Sherman of Connecticut, Benjamin Franklin of Pennsylvania and Robert R. Livingston of New York–to draft a formal statement justifying the break with Great Britain.


John Adams believed that July 2nd was the correct date on which to celebrate the birth of American independence, and would reportedly turn down invitations to appear at July 4th events in protest. Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died on July 4, 1826–the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

On July 2nd, the Continental Congress voted in favour of Lee’s resolution for independence in a near-unanimous vote (the New York delegation abstained, but later voted affirmatively). On that day, John Adams wrote to his wife Abigail that July 2 “will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival” and that the celebration should include “Pomp and Parade…Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other.”

On July 4th, the Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, which had been written largely by Jefferson.

Though the vote for actual independence took place on July 2nd, from then on the 4th became the day that was celebrated as the birth of American independence.

#AHN2014

#american, #happy-independence-day

#Russia : ” Polar Expedition Headed by `Faddey Bellingshausen’ Discovered Antarctica”

#AHN2014

#acehistorynews, #history2research, #polar-expedition

US: “George Stinney the `Boy of 14 Executed 70 Years Ago’ May Get Another Day in Court”

#AceNewsServices says some of you may remember this case which l highlighted on “AceHistoryNews”  on the “Miranda Rights” and the fact he was not protected.

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old

George Stinney, 1944, executed at age 14 years old (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Extract of Original Post: 

“In a South Carolina prison on June 16, 1944, guards walked a 14-year-old Black boy, bible tucked under his arm, to theelectric chair. He used the bible as a booster seat. At 5′ 1″ and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg. The switch was pulled, and the adult sized death mask fell from his face. Tears streamed from his wide-open, tearful eyes, and saliva dripped from his mouth. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the execution of the youngest person in the United States in the past century.

George Stinney was accused of killing two White girls, 11-year-old Betty June Binnicker and 8-year-old Mary Emma Thames. Because there were no Miranda rights in 1944, Stinney was questioned without a lawyer and his parents were not allowed into the room. The sheriff when said that Stinney admitted to the killings, but there is only his word — no written record of the confession has been found. Reports even said that the officers offered Stinney ice cream for confessing to the crimes.

'Old Sparky' is the electric chair that Nebras...

‘Old Sparky’ is the electric chair that Nebraska used for executions. It is housed in the Nebraska State Penitentiary in Lincoln, Nebraska (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Latest Good News: 

(COLUMBIA, S.C.) — A 14-year-old boy executed by South Carolina nearly 70 years ago is finally getting another day in court.

Supporters of George Stinney plan to argue Tuesday that there wasn’t enough evidence to find him guilty in 1944 of killing a 7-year-old and an 11-year-old girl. The black teen was found guilty of killing the white girls in a trial that lasted less than a day in the tiny Southern mill town of Alcolu, separated, as most were in those days, by race.

Nearly all the evidence, including a confession that was central to the case against Stinney, has disappeared, along with the transcript of the trial. Lawyers working on behalf of Stinney’s family have sworn statements from his relatives accounting for his time the day the girls were killed, from a cell-mate saying he never confessed to the crime and from a pathologist disputing the findings of the autopsy done on the victims.

The novel decision whether to give an executed man a new trial will be in the hands of Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen. Experts say it is a longshot. South Carolina law has a high bar for new trials based on evidence that could have been discovered at the time of the trial. Also, the legal system in the state before segregation often found defendants guilty with evidence that would be considered scant today. If Mullen finds in favor of Stinney, it could open the door for hundreds of other appeals.

But the Stinney case is unique in one way. At 14, he’s the youngest person executed in the United States in the past 100 years. Even in 1944, there was an outcry over putting someone so young in the electric chair. Newspaper accounts said the straps in the chair didn’t fit around his 95-pound body and an electrode was too big for his leg.

Stinney’s supporters said racism, common in the Jim Crow era South, meant deputies in Clarendon County did little investigation after they decided Stinney was the prime suspect. They said he was pulled from his parents and interrogated without a lawyer.

School board member George Frierson heard stories about Stinney growing up in the same mill town and has spent a decade fighting to get him exonerated. He swallowed hard as he said he hardly slept before the day he has waited 10 years to see.

“Somebody that didn’t kill someone is finally getting his day in court,” Frierson said.

Back in 1944, Stinney was likely the only black person in the courtroom during his one-day trial. On Tuesday, the prosecutor arguing against him will be Ernest “Chip” Finney III, the son of South Carolina’s first black Chief Justice. Finney said last month he won’t preset any evidence against Stinney at the hearing, but if a new trial is granted, he will ask for time to conduct a new investigation.

What that investigation might find is not known. South Carolina did not have a statewide law enforcement unit to help smaller jurisdictions until 1947. Newspaper stories about Stinney’s trial offer little clue whether any evidence was introduced beyond the teen’s confession and an autopsy report. Some people around Alcolu said bloody clothes were taken from Stinney’s home, but never introduced at trial because of his confession. No record of those clothes exists.

Relatives of one of the girls killed, 11-year-old Betty Binnicker, have recently spoke out as well, saying Stinney was known around town as a bully who threatened to fight or kill people who came too close to the grass where he grazed the family cow.

It isn’t known if the judge will rule Tuesday, or take time to come to her decision. Stinney’s supporters said if the motion for a new trial fails, they will ask the state to pardon him.

 

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#acehistorynews, #ace-history-news, #clarendon-county-south-carolina, #columbia-south-carolina, #electric-chair, #george-stinney, #jim-crow-laws, #nebraska-state-penitentiary, #south-carolina, #stinney, #united-states

” The Darker Side of Chocolate Unmasking the Slave Trade”

#AceHistoryNews says this true life story of how our “Chocolate” is made using “Slave Labour” #profitb4people
Editor says visit this link http://wp.me/p48Dp0-8a to learn a lot more?

#history2research, #chocolate, #slave-trade

“Lindisfarne Gospels”

#acehistorynews, #lindisfarne-gospels

“Trial By Jury: An Essential Safeguard For A Free Society”

#acehistorynews, #history2research, #ilovehistoryandresearch, #free-society, #jury, #thomas-jefferson, #trial

” Japanese History Every Picture Tells a Story in 1961″

#AceHistoryNews says thanks to “Vintage Everyday” for these beautiful pictures #History2Research

#japanese, #picture, #story, #tells

” Christian and Muslims and the Siege of Malaga 1487″

#AceHistoryNews says Málaga was the main objective of the 1487 campaign by the Catholic Monarchs against the Emirate of Granada, which had been steadily losing territory to the Christian forces. King Ferdinand II of Aragon left Córdoba with an army of 20,000 horsemen, 50,000 laborers and 8,000 support troops. This contingent joined the artillery commanded by Francisco Ramírez de Madrid that left Écija. The army decided to first attack Vélez-Málaga, and then continue west to Malaga. Nasrid spies gave word of the movements of Christians, and the inhabitants of Vélez fled to the mountains and the Bentomiz castle. #History2Research

#christians-and-muslims, #malaga

#AceHistoryNews latest post and every picture tells a…

#AceHistoryNews latest post and every picture tells a story of Japan in 1961
More: http://wp.me/p48Dp0-6C

#japan, #pictures

#AceHistoryNews says latest Snapshot of History post…

#AceHistoryNews says latest “Snapshot of History” post can be found at the link, this time if you click on #AceHistoryNews a friend of mine #Digger666 has his post on the “Banana Republic”. Enjoy. http://history2research.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/snapshot-of-history-banana-wars-and-the-preservation-of-american-interests-in-the-area/

#banana-republic, #snapshot-of-history

#AceHistoryNews says with all the furore about the…

#AceHistoryNews says with all the furore about the changes to the “Solemn Rite” of Christenings by the “Church of England” l thought a little history post was in order. So here it is: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/baptism-to-christenings/

#baptism, #christenings, #church-of-england, #solemn-rite

#AceHistoryNews says latest post just published for those…

#AceHistoryNews says latest post just published for those who are a fan of “Chinese History” and especially “People’s Republic of China” you can read a lot more at http://wp.me/p48Dp0-5Q

#history2research, #chinese-history, #peoples-republic-of-china

#AceHistoryNews says latest post on an amazing discovery…

#AceHistoryNews says latest post on an amazing discovery by an “Israeli Researcher” and an incredible blue dye commanded by God to Mose to be used by the “Children of Israel” Interested to know more visit this link at: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2014/01/02/after-2000-years-ancient-blue-dye-has-been-found-that-was-used-by-the-children-of-israel/
#History2Research

#2000-years, #children-of-israel, #god, #israel

#AceHistoryNews says my latest post for New…

#AceHistoryNews says my latest post for “New Years Eve and New years Day” and here is a small extract of both.

New Year’s Eve is December 31 of every year. It is celebrated in countries that use the Gregorian calendar with the United States, Australia, British Isles, North & South America, Europe, Scandinavia and (the former) Soviet Union as the main regions in the world who welcome in a new year.
It is exactly at the stroke of midnight on December 31 of the current year that marks the transition to the New Year ahead. Celebrations may be wild parties or solemn times of prayer. Some participants will dress up in silly outfits and wear comical hats, drink champagne (or other liquors of their choice) and use traditional items called “noise makers” to express their joy and hope for the new year ahead. Unfortunately, with some people this celebratory behaviour gets taken a bit too far. Some people have been known to make improper advances to co-workers at parties, throw their arms around total strangers on the streets or in crowds and well perhaps to other things that would be considered totally unacceptable any other day of the year.

New Years Day January 1st is considered New Years Day in today’s society. But this is a new concept because up until the time of Julius Caesar, the Romans celebrated the New Year in March because it was the first month in the Roman calendar. However, January 1 marked the time when the Romans changed their governmental figures and new consuls were inducted into office. And, they had games and feasting to help celebrate the new officials. But, they still used March 1 as their official mark of the new year and had a festival to their god, Mars (God of War).

It was Caesar who changed the Roman New Year’s Day to January 1 in honour of Janus, (God of all beginnings and gate-keeper of heaven and earth). Janus was always depicted with two faces: One looking back to the old year (past) and one looking ahead to the new year (future). One of the customs in the festival honouring Janus was to exchange gifts and then make resolutions to be friendly and good to one another.

Read More: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2013/12/31/tradition-of-new-years-eve-and-new-years-day/

#happynewyear2014, #god, #janus, #new-years-day, #new-years-eve, #roman

Mandela My Take by G Jose James

#AceHistoryNews says this another excellent #AceGuestPost by #GJose.James here is a small exert: Speculation will continue to abound for the foreseeable future relative to the factors that caused former President of South Africa, Nelson Mandela, change from advocating armed struggle and violence prior to his 27 year incarceration, to embracing non-violence and peaceful coexistence, following his release. Some suggest that Mandela was “broken” (physically and psychologically), similar to a wild horse that has been tamed, or seasoned. Others assert that his food in prison was laced with stuff that altered his behavior. Still others say that Mandela had a religious experience. Interestingly enough, there are those who argue that his domestic situation negatively impacted his revolutionary fervor during the almost three decades of confinement. Read More: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2013/12/22/mandela-south-africa-my-takeby-g-jose-james/

#aceguestpost-nelsonmandela, #gjose-james, #south-africa, #u

“Pope Preaches Letting God Write History”

#AceWorldNews says according to the latest from VATICAN CITY, December 17 (CNA) .- Pope Francis’ daily homily focused on the importance of allowing God to be active and present in our daily lives.

“This is holiness: to let God write our history. And this is a Christmas wish for every one of us, that the Lord writes your history and that you let him write it. May it be so!” he preached on Dec. 17 in the chapel of the Saint Martha guest-house.

God’s joy “was to live his life with us,” explained Pope Francis. Even after mankind sinned, God did not abandon us but rather came closer, wishing to “make history” with us.

“When God wishes to say who he is, he says ‘I am the God of Abraham, of Isaac and Jacob.’ But what is God’s last name? It is ours, each one of ours. He takes our name to be his own last name,” reflected Pope Francis.

“Approaching Christmas, one may come to think: if He has made his history with us, if He has taken his last name from us, if he has allowed us to write his history, at least we can allow Him to write our history.”

Pope Francis then acknowledged that the genealogy of Jesus found in today’s gospel may seem unexciting at first glance, but actually contains a very important truth.

“One time I heard someone say: ‘But this bit of the gospel seems like a telephone directory!’ But no, it’s quite another thing. This passage of the gospel is pure history.”

Just as Jesus “is consubstantial” with God the Father, he takes the origin of his humanity from “his mother, a woman,” explained the Pope. The ancestry provided in the gospel then demonstrates Jesus’ human place in history.

“God did not want to come to save us without history. He wanted to make history with us.”

This history is not a perfect one: in the list of Jesus’ ancestors, Pope Francis said, “there are saints… but in this list there are also sinners.”

Despite the sinfulness of human beings, “God has put himself in history! He is with us. He has made the journey with us,” encouraged the Pontiff.

Today is Pope Francis’ 77th birthday, which he requested be celebrated by the residents and staff of the Saint Martha guesthouse attending morning mass together.

This transmission is intended for the named addressee(s) only and may contain sensitive or protectively marked material up to RESTRICTED and should be handled accordingly. Unless you are the named addressee (or authorised to receive it for the addressee) you may not copy or use it, or disclose it to anyone else. If you have received this transmission in error please notify the sender immediately.

#acehistorynews, #aceworldnews, #god, #pope-francis

#AceHistoryNews says the Freedom of Information Act FOIA…

#AceHistoryNews says the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) gives any person the right to request access to records of the Executive Branch of the United States Government. The records requested must be disclosed unless they are protected from disclosure by any of the nine exemptions contained in the law or by one of three special law enforcement record exclusions.
READ MORE http://history2research.wordpress.com/2013/12/09/freedom-of-information-act/

#history2research, #ilovehistoryandresearch, #foia, #us

#AceHistoryNews ” The Rosicrucian Order ” Guest Post and Views

As a former member of the Rosicrucian Order during the 1970’s, I am competent to observe that the original members of this secret society were Gnostic and keepers of their mysterious knowledge.
READ MORE ON OUR HISTORY2RESEARCH GROUP PAGE AT: http://history2research.wordpress.com/2013/12/09/the-rosicrucian-order/

#aceguestnews, #aceguestviews, #acehistorynews, #history2research, #ilovehistoryandresearch, #order, #rosicrucian

The British Ambassador’s residence in Paris: 200 years old and still going strong

#AceWorldNews says “Sir Peter Rickett’s” launches a series of events in 2014 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the residence.

As Ambassador to France, I and my wife have the huge good fortune to live in the lovely Hotel de Charost. This was bought in 1814 by the Duke of Wellington from Pauline Borghese, the sister of Napoleon. Since then it has been a place where British and French people from many walks of life have met to talk about the issues of the moment and plan together for the challenges of the future.

In celebrating the 200th anniversary, I am keen to keep up this great tradition to using the historic house as a place to work together on the future. So I am organising a series of events over the coming year, leading up to the actual anniversary when the Duke paid up for the house, in October. Over the year, we will hold a number of events showcasing Britain and France working together on some of the major issues for the future. For example:

We will have an event dedicated to cities of the future, inspired by the examples of Paris and London.

We will be bringing together some of the best and brightest young programmers from Britain and France to work together to come up with new ways of using government data to develop innovative products and services.

We will examine the role of innovation and excellence in sport, with Sir Dave Brailsford explaining the story behind the success of GB cycling and Team Sky, looking ahead to the start of the Tour de France in Yorkshire in 2014.

We will round off the series with a colloque in October 2014, where distinguished historians will discuss the big issues of 1814.

To kick off the series, Lord Chris Patten, the Chancellor of Oxford University and Chairman of the BBC Trust, gave a talk on 28 November. He reflected on the economic and political rise of China, and the implications of this for the US and Europe. In particular, he made the case for Britain and France to put old rivalries behind us, and challenged us to work even more closely together in the future to make sure that Europe’s many strengths count in the fast changing world of the 21st century.

We will be putting the highlights from all the sessions on our website,Facebook and Twitter. Please join us through our social networking sites in celebrating this very special year.

Sir Peter Ricketts

Resources

#acehistorynews, #ambassador-to-france, #anniversary, #bbc-trust, #britain, #british-embassy-paris, #chris-patten, #dave-brailsford, #duke-of-wellington, #france, #pauline-borghese, #peter-rickett, #peter-ricketts, #sir-peter-rickett, #team-sky

History of the Jefferson Nickel

English: Ad placed by Samuel Brown in numismat...

English: Ad placed by Samuel Brown in numismatic magazines, offering to buy 1913 Liberty Head nickels (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceHistoryNews says the coin is an American five-cent piece which was produced in extremely limited quantities without the authority of the United States Mint.

The Liberty head design was used between 1883 and 1913, when it was replaced by the Indian Head (Buffalo) design.

The first official striking of nickels by the Mint in 1913 were of the Buffalo design, and the official records have no record of Liberty Head nickels produced in that year.

The 1913 Liberty Head Nickel was part of the hopes and dreams for something better that saw the American nation through the terrible Depression Era of the 1930’s. Riding on the foundation of this hope, later coin dealers who handled the 1913 Nickels built upon the legend, enhancing and enlarging it.

However, five 1913 Liberty Head Nickels were created and were first displayed at the American Numismatic Association‘s annual convention by the coin collector Samuel Brown. Brown had previously placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 looking for information on these coins and offering to pay $500 for each.  However, various theories abound as to where he acquired the coins:  as Brown had been an employee of the Mint in 1913, many numismatic historians have concluded that he was responsible for unofficially striking the coins himself.

The five coins in existence are known as the Eliasberg, the Olsen, the Norweb, the McDermott, and the Reynolds.

The Eliasberg specimen is the finest known 191...

The Eliasberg specimen is the finest known 1913 Liberty Head nickel. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Eliasberg Specimen:

The  Eliasberg is the finest known specimen of the five 1913 Liberty Head nickels. Of the five, two have proof surfaces, and the other three were  produced with standard striking techniques. The finest of the coins has been graded Proof-66 by various professional grading services,  including PCGS and NGC.

This coin was purchased from  Newman and Johnson by the Numismatic Gallery, a coin dealership that then sold it to famed collector Louis Eliasberg. It remained in Eliasberg’s collection until after his death. In May 1996, it was sold at an auction conducted by Bowers and Merena,  where it was purchased by rarities dealer Jay Parrino for $1,485,000, breaking the World Record price for a coin at that time.

When it was auctioned again in March 2001, the price rose to $1,840,000. In May 2005, Legend Numismatics purchased the Eliasberg specimen for $4,150,000. In 2007, the Eliasberg Specimen was sold to an unnamed  collector in California for $5 million.

Olsen SpecimenOlsen Specimen:

The Olsen specimen was  once featured on Hawaii Five-O (in an episode called ‘The $100,000 Nickel’, aired in 1973, and is the most famous of the five. It has been graded Proof-64 by both PCGS and NGC, and was also briefly owned by Egyptian King Farouk.

It was bought by collector Fred Olsen, who then sold the coin to Farouk, but his name has remained attached to it ever since. It was purchased by World Wide Coin Investments in 1972 for $100,000, who then sold it for $200,000 to  Superior Galleries in 1978. It has been resold several times, most recently  by Heritage Auction Galleries in January 2010 for $3,737,500.

Norweb SpecimenNorweb Specimen:

The Norweb specimen is currently displayed in an exhibition at The Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

In 1949 it was purchased by King Farouk to replace the Olsen specimen, which he had sold. It remained in Farouk’s collection until he was deposed in 1952. Two years later his possessions were all auctioned off by the new regime, and the coin was purchased by Ambassador Henry Norweb. In 1977 he donated the specimen to the Smithsonian, where it remains to this day10.

Walton Specimen:

The Walton specimen was believed to have been lost for over 40 years. The collector George O. Walton purchased it from Newman and Johnson in 1945. On March 9, 1962, Walton died in a car crash whilst on his way to exhibit the Nickel at a coin show. $250,000 worth of coins was recovered from the crash site, and among them was the 1913 Liberty nickel in a custom-made holder.

Walton SpecimenHowever, in 1963 when his relatives later tried to sell the coins at auction the nickel was mistakenly identified as a fake. The coin remained in the possession of Walton’s relatives until 2003, when the American Numismatic Association launched a nationwide hunt for the missing fifth specimen. He arranged with Bowers and Merena auction house to offer $1m to purchase the coin or as a guarantee for consigning it to one of their auctions, and a reward of $10,000 was offered if representatives of Bowers and Merena could be the first to see the long-lost specimen.

Walton’s relatives heard about the reward, and brought it to the ANA convention in Baltimore where expert authenticators from the P.C.G.S examined it and determined it to be genuine. The coin is still owned by Walton’s relatives and is on loan to the American Numismatic Association’s Edward C. Rochette Money Museum in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

McDermott Specimen:

McDermott SpecimenAlso currently held by the Money Museum, the McDermott Specimen is the only one to bear circulation marks. It was once owned  by collector J.V. McDermott, who often carried the coin around with him and would show it off in bars. Due to this activity, the coin lost some of its original mint lustre, becoming circulated in condition. After McDermott died the coin was sold in 1967 for US$46,000, and later donated to the ANA in 1989, where it is exhibited in the Money Museum

Other theories suggest they were created as test pieces in 1912, or created as cabinet pieces for the Mint itself. However they came into existence, all five were sold by Brown in 1924 and passed through the hands of various collectors until they reached Colonel E.H.R. Green. Green kept them in his collection until his death in 1936. His estate was then auctioned off, and all five of the 1913  Liberty Head nickels were purchased by two dealers, Eric P. Newman and B.G. Johnson. The dealers then broke up the set for the first time.

Its legendary status was due in large part to the coin dealer B. Max Mehl, who used it as part of a publicity campaign to sell copies of his ‘Star Rare Coin Encyclopaedia’. He advertised across the country that he would pay $50 to anyone who found one and sent it to him, and such an offer during the Depression caused great excitement as the nation started searching through their loose change.

Conclusion: 

Jefferson NickelThe Jefferson nickel has been the five-cent coin struck by the United States Mint since 1938, when it replaced the Buffalo nickel. Since 2006, the copper-nickel coin’s obverse has featured a  forward-facing portrayal of early U.S. President Thomas Jefferson by Jamie Franki. The coin’s reverse is the original by Felix Schlag; in 2004 and 2005, the piece bore commemorative designs. The Mint conducted a competition for a new nickel depicting Jefferson and his home, Monticello, which Schlag won, but was required to submit an entirely new reverse and make other changes. The new piece went into production in October 1938 and was released on November 15. As nickel was a strategic war material during World War II, nickels coined from 1942 to 1945  were struck in a copper-silver-manganese alloy which would not require adjustment to vending machines, and bear a large mint mark above the depiction of Monticello on the reverse. In 2004 and 2005, the nickel saw new designs as part of the Westward Journey nickel series, and since 2006 has borne Schlag’s reverse and Franki’s obverse.

In 1996, numismatic history was made as Jay Parino paid over 1 million dollars for the Eliasberg specimen of the 1913 liberty  nickel. This was the first coin to break the million-dollar barrier, with a final hammer price of $1,485,000 after a 10% buyer’s fee was added. This amount surpassed the previous record paid, set in 1989, of $990,000 for the Dexter specimen of the 1804 Dollar and the $962,500 paid for the Reed Hawn Specimen of the 1913 Liberty Nickel. You can read a transcript of this sale, and even listen to the actual auction call by clicking here. The mystery surrounding this coin is that, while there are 5 known specimens, there is no record at the mint of any being produced. Here lies the mystery.

The existence of a Nickel with the Liberty design dated 1913 was not known until the ANA convention in 1920,  and even speculation of such a coin was not even thought of until the following ad was placed in the December 1919 issue of the Numismatist.

 

#1913-liberty-head-nickel, #american-numismatic-association, #bowers, #coin, #colorado-springs, #eric-p-newman, #felix-schlag, #heritage-auctions, #jefferson, #jefferson-nickel, #mint, #monticello, #nickel, #thomas-jefferson, #united-states, #united-states-mint, #world-war-ii