(WORLDWIDE) #Climate Change & Global Warming Report: The Group of 20 rich countries are divided over phasing out coal and committing to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius as they prepare for a crucial summit in Rome next week, sources familiar with the negotiations said #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.22: The need to curb emissions will be high on the agenda of the Rome G20 gathering on Oct. 30-31, seen as a key stepping stone immediately ahead of broader United Nations climate talks, called #COP26, to be held in Glasgow, Scotland.

#AceDailyNews says that according to a report G20 split over coal, 1.5 degree climate limit ahead of Rome summit according to sources and so far big polluters such as China and India have dug in their heels and little progress has been made since G20 energy and environment ministers met in Naples in July, said three sources, asking not to be named due to the sensitivity of the talks

Just as #COP26 is due to get underway and leaders look at #ProfitB4People again ….

“Countries are not moving, at the moment they are still just making sure their positions are heard loud and clear,” said one of the sources.

However he added that such intransigence was normal at this stage and any concessions were unlikely to come before G20 climate sherpas meet face-to-face next Thursday and Friday, immediately before their leaders’ weekend meeting.

“Where I see the problem is in the commitment to 1.5 degrees and in the phase out of coal and fossil fuels by China, India and Russia,” said another source, a G20 minister.

In Naples, energy and environment ministers recognized the desirability of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees but fell short of a clear commitment to achieve the goal.

They also failed to reach unanimous agreement on fixing dates to end fossil fuel subsidies, halt international financing of coal projects and phase out coal power altogether, asking leaders to bridge the gaps at the upcoming Rome summit.

Big-hitters stay home

At least four G20 leaders are not expected to come to Rome, including China’s Xi Jinping, at the helm of the world’s biggest greenhouse gas emitter, and Russia’s Vladimir Putin, head of the largest energy producer.

One source said while such absences were “not a great political signal,” they would not necessarily prevent progress.

Neither Russia, China nor India have committed to achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2050, considered a vital goal in limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees.

So far China is proving most reluctant to commit to the 1.5 degree ceiling, while India is most intransigent in not pledging net zero emissions by 2050, one of the sources said.

China and India are also among a group of countries that have not yet presented new national plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) ahead of COP 26, on how they will help curb climate change.

The COP26 president, Britain’s Alok Sharma, said in a speech this month the G20, which accounts for 80 percent of global emissions, would be “make, or break” for achieving success in Glasgow.

However, one of the sources said breakthroughs were more likely in Glasgow than in Rome.

Big emitters like China, India and Russia tend to feel pressured and hectored by the Western countries at the G20, he said, making them defensive and reluctant to concede ground.

The much larger UN forum was more “neutral” and conducive to compromise, he said.

The Rome G20 will also focus on the coronavirus pandemic and how to foster global economic recovery, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, who will chair the meeting, said on Wednesday.

#AceNewsDesk report ………………Published: Oct.22: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#china, #climate-change, #g20, #global-warming, #naples, #rome, #worldwide

(SCOTLAND) Wages Award Report: A pay offer to avoid rail network being crippled by strikes during COP26 is “is not worthy of consideration”, a union has said #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.17: The dispute is linked to an ongoing row over pay which has affected Sunday services in recent months: ScotRail said its latest two-year offer of 4.7% was “very reasonable”.

#AceDailyNews says according to BBC Scotland the rail union rejects ‘unacceptable’ pay offer of 4.7% for two years to avoid strikes The RMT said members who work for ScotRail and Caledonian Sleeper will stage industrial action during the UN climate summit in Glasgow.

rail

But Michael Hogg, from the RMT union, said it would not ballot ScotRail workers on a deal he described as “rotten” and “lousy” as it also involved efficiency savings: That would mean workers having to give up some current terms and conditions in order to get a pay rise, a caveat Mr Hogg branded “unacceptable”.

Mr Hogg told BBC Radio’s Good Morning Scotland programme there will be no trains running anywhere in Scotland during COP26 if the strikes go ahead.

He added: “Our representatives do not feel that this offer is worthy of consideration. It’s a kick in the teeth to key, essential workers.”

On Thursday, it was announced staff will strike from 00:01 on Monday 1 November until 23:59 on Friday 12 November.

The global COP26 summit, which is expected to draw thousands of people to Glasgow, runs from 31 October until 12 November.

Sleeper staff will strike on Sunday 31 October from 11:59 until 11:58 hours on Tuesday 2 November and again for 48 hours on Thursday 11 November from 11:59.

GMB cleansing workers in Glasgow and Unite’s Stagecoach staff have also voted to strike during COP26……

ScotRail operations manager David Simpson told Good Morning Scotland “a very positive offer” was made to the union last weekend and he had expected it to be put to the RMT’s members.

But instead it called a strike, a move he said was “very frustrating and very disappointing”.

Mr Simpson denied ScotRail had been “stonewalling” the union and said the pandemic had prompted more discussion over the last 18 months than ever before.

He added: “Many workers would say 4.7% over two years is anything but a derisory offer and it compares well with other industries.”

Getty ImagesAll scheduled trains will be cancelled if the strikes go ahead

Kathryn Darbandi, managing director for Serco Caledonian Sleeper, said any action during the climate summit would be incredibly damaging.

She said: “We have repeatedly tabled realistic and reasonable offers which we believe should have ended the dispute. 

“Industrial action during COP26 – when the eyes of the world will be on Scotland – risks both the reputation of rail as an environmentally-friendly and sustainable mode of transport, but also the great progress the entire team at Caledonian Sleeper have made in building back the confidence of our guests.

“The RMT’s action does not reflect the reality of the financial situation facing all parties in Scotland’s railway today, as we seek to rebuild the industry for the future. We need to work together, and we continue to be open to realistic discussions.” 

PA Media: The climate summit will be held at the Scottish Events Campus in Glasgow

Transport Minister Graeme Dey said that the RMT was in receipt of a “very fair” pay proposal.

And he told Good Morning Scotland many of its members will have voted for strike action “unaware of the offer that is now on the table”.

Mr Dey also described the two-year deal, which he said has been backed by the three other unions involved, was “the best offer that can be made in the circumstances”. 

But Scottish Conservative transport spokesman Graham Simpson accused the Scottish government of distancing themselves from the dispute.

He said: “Glasgow is about to take centre stage in a matter of weeks, and the SNP are still claiming they have no idea why rail strikes are continuing.

“SNP ministers must work with all parties to find a solution before these persisting strikes cast a shadow over the COP26 conference.”

It is the latest stage in a long-running dispute over pay and conditions and proposed cuts to services at the rail operator, which wants to reduce the number of services across Scotland by 300 a day from next May.

ScotRail is currently run by Dutch firm Abellio – but will be taken over by a company owned and controlled by the Scottish government in March next year.

The move was announced by the government earlier this year after Abellio was stripped of its contract three years early amid concern over its performance. 

‘Significant offer’

Transport Scotland said it welcomed constructive talks between all parties and that a “significant offer” has been made by employers since the RMT ballot opened.

A spokeswoman said: “We understand that the RMT will now ballot its membership again on the substance of this offer. We hope that RMT members and the other unions will agree and accept this offer, putting to an end existing and proposed industrial disputes and action: Rail workers have played their part in keeping the country moving through the pandemic and we are sure that they will see the importance of the moment and the role they can play in showing the best Scotland’s Railway has to offer as we welcome world leaders from across the globe to COP26.”

Meanwhile, Chris Mitchell of the GMB denied cleansing workers in Glasgow were using the global climate conference as a bargaining chip.

Mr Mitchell claimed his members had been “put in a corner” by Cosla despite their “heroic efforts” during the pandemic.

And he told Good Morning Scotland the current pay offer of £850 a year would only amount to an extra £6.50 a week, after tax and National Insurance was taken off.

Mr Mitchell said he acknowledged the importance of COP26, but added: “Cosla need to realise there is an emergency on their own door step.”

The COP26 global climate summit in Glasgow in November is seen as crucial if climate change is to be brought under control. Almost 200 countries are being asked for their plans to cut emissions, and it could lead to major changes to our everyday lives…..

#AceNewsDesk report ………………Published: Oct.17: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#cop26, #glasgow, #pay, #railways, #scotland

(BEIJING) Energy Crisis Report: The price of coal used in China’s power plants has surged to a new record high as another of the country’s key mining regions is hit by flooding #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.14: Heavy rains hit Shanxi in recent days, the country’s biggest coal producing province, after record floods struck the mining region of Henan in July.

#AceDailyNews says according to BBC Business News China floods: Coal price hits fresh high as mines shut as XI decides its time to open more mines to supply the energy just as #COP26 is due to begin & Thermal coal on the Zhengzhou Commodity Exchange rose by over 10% on Tuesday so on Friday, Beijing reportedly ordered China’s coal mines to boost output.

Rescue teams pump water at flooded Jiexiu Fenhe wetland park in Jinzhong, Shanxi Province of China.
China’s Shanxi Province has been hit by flooding in recent days

The floods further complicate China’s efforts to increase fuel supplies to ease its deepening energy crisis.

Shanxi Province, which produced around a third of China’s coal supplies this year, was forced to temporarily shut dozens of mines due to flooding. Although some sites are now slowly resuming operations.

At least 15 people have died during the severe flooding that has affected more than 1.76 million people in the province, local officials said on Tuesday.

Torrential rain last week led to houses collapsing and triggered landslides across more than 70 districts and cities in the northern province.

Even before the flooding, China was already facing an energy shortage which has caused power cuts in large parts of the country.

In recent weeks, energy firms have been forced to limit electricity supplies to millions of homes and business.

The move was the latest attempt by authorities to increase coal supplies after prices hit record highs and electricity shortages forced energy firms to ration power.

Since last month, a series of power cuts has forced factories to cut back production or stop operations completely

Manufacturing hubs in the northeast of China have been hit particularly hard.

The latest rise in the price of thermal coal prices comes on top of a 12% jump on Monday.

Energy prices have been rising across the world as the global economy starts to emerge from the pandemic.

On Monday, the cost of Brent crude hit its highest since level October 2018, while US-traded oil touched a fresh seven-year-high.

China is a country caught in the middle of a global struggle – to develop but also be green

#AceNewsDesk report ……………Published: Oct.14: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#beijing, #china, #coal

(WORLDWIDE) Climate Change Study Report: #COP26 Approaches with everyone saying this one has to be the one that we keep our promises but with sponsorship from oil and energy companies lobbying and now muted scientists do we really believe it will #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.09: Less than 1% of the authors were based in Africa, while only 12 of the papers had a female lead researcher: The lack of diverse voices means key perspectives are being ignored, says the study’s author. ……

#AceDailyNews says that according to BBC News Climate Change Voices from global south muted by climate science after the study looked at 100 of the most highly cited climate research papers over the past five years as Climate change academics from some of the regions worst hit by warming are struggling to be published, according to a new analysis.

By Matt McGrath
BBC Environment correspondent

Researchers from the Carbon Brief website examined the backgrounds of around 1,300 authors involved in the 100 most cited climate change research papers from 2016-2020.

climate researcher

They found that some 90% of these scientists were affiliated with academic institutions from North America, Europe or Australia. 

CELINE CLERYI: Issues concern to African climate researchers were in danger of being ignored……

The African continent, home to around 16% of the world’s population had less than 1% of the authors according to the analysis. 

There were also huge differences within regions – of the 10 authors from Africa, eight of them were from South Africa. 

When it comes to lead authors, not one of the top 100 papers was led by a scientist from Africa or South America. Of the seven papers led by Asian authors, five were from China. 

“If the vast majority of research around climate change is coming from a group of people with a very similar background, for example, male scientists from the global north, then the body of knowledge that we’re going to have around climate change is going to be skewed towards their interests, knowledge and scientific training,” said Ayesha Tandon from Carbon Brief, who carried out the analysis and says that “systemic bias” is at play here.

“One study noted that a lot of our understanding of climate change is biased towards cooler climates, because it’s mainly carried out by scientists who live in the global north in cold climates,” she added. 

There are a number of other factors at play that limit the opportunities for researchers from the global south. These include a lack of funding for expensive computers to run the computer models, or simulations, that are the bedrock of much climate research.

Other issues include a different academic culture where teaching is prioritised over research, as well as language barriers and a lack of access to expensive libraries and databases.

MATTHIEU RONDEL: Most of the leading papers on climate change were published by institutions in the global north….

Even where researchers from better-off countries seek to collaborate with colleagues in the developing world, the efforts don’t always work out well. 

One researcher originally from Tanzania but now working in Mexico explained what can happen. 

“The northern scientist often brings his or her own grad students from the north, and they tend to view their local partners as facilitators – logistic, cultural, language, admin – rather than science collaborators,” Dr Tuyeni Mwampamba from the Institute of Ecosystems and Sustainability Research in Mexico told Carbon Brief. 

Researchers from the north are often seen as wanting to extract resources and data from developing nations without making any contribution to local research, a practice sometimes known as “helicopter science”.

For women involved in research in the global south there are added challenges in getting your name on a scientific paper

SIA KAMBOUA scientist at work in Cote D’Ivoire: Women tend to have a much higher dropout rate than men as they progress through academia,” said Ayesha Tandon: But then women also have to contend with stereotypes and sexism, and even just cultural norms in their country or from the upbringing that might prevent them from spending as much time on their science or from pursuing it in the way that men do.”

The analysis suggests that the lack of voices from women and from the global south is hampering the global understanding of climate change. 

Solving the problem is not going to be easy, according to the author. 

“This is a systemic problem and it will progress and keep getting worse, because people in positions of power will continue to have those privileges,” said Ayesha Tandon.

“It’s a problem that will not just go away on its own unless people really work at it.”

#AceNewsDesk report …………………..Published: Oct.09: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#cop26, #climate-change, #worldwide

(WORLDWIDE) JUST IN: IPCC REPORT: UK calls for greater global ambition as UN finds world warming faster than expected #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Aug.09: This latest report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is a stark warning from scientists around the world that human activity is damaging the planet at an alarming rate.

#AcDailyNews reports today that the UK is calling for urgent global action in response to the latest report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). So as we head towards #COP26 we are told what most people already knew that the world is heating up quicker than expected …Q/. So what do WE DO about it? A/……..!

IPCC REPORT:
  • UN report out today warns we could reach 1.5 degrees warming in the next decades without immediate action
  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson and COP26 President Alok Sharma call for urgent steps to cut global emissions
  • UK lobbying countries to increase ambition on climate change ahead of COP26 in Glasgow in November

https://twitter.com/ipcc_ch/status/1424654466566037504?s=21

The report warns that climate change is already affecting every region across the globe and that without urgent action to limit warming, heatwaves, heavy precipitation, droughts, and loss of Arctic Sea ice, snow cover and permafrost, will all increase while carbon sinks will become less effective at slowing the growth of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

It highlights that cutting global emissions, starting immediately, to net zero by mid-century would give a good chance of limiting global warming to 1.5C in the long-term and help to avoid the worst effects of climate change.

The Prime Minister Boris Johnson said:

Today’s report makes for sobering reading, and it is clear that the next decade is going to be pivotal to securing the future of our planet. We know what must be done to limit global warming – consign coal to history and shift to clean energy sources, protect nature and provide climate finance for countries on the frontline.

The UK is leading the way, decarbonising our economy faster than any country in the G20 over the last two decades. I hope today’s IPCC report will be a wake-up call for the world to take action now, before we meet in Glasgow in November for the critical COP26 summit.

As extreme events are felt across the globe, from wildfires in North America to floods in China, across Europe, India and parts of Africa, and heatwaves in Siberia, COP President Alok Sharma has been negotiating with governments and businesses to increase global climate ambition and take immediate action to help halve global emissions in the next decade and reach net zero emissions by mid-century in order to keep the 1.5C goal set out in the Paris Agreement within reach.

The UK is already showing leadership with clear plans to reduce its emissions by 68% by 2030 and 78% by 2035, leading to net zero by 2050. Today, more than 70% of the world’s economy is now covered by a net zero target – up from 30% when the UK took over as incoming COP Presidency. In May, all G7 countries came forward with 2030 emission reduction targets that put them on a pathway to reaching this goal by 2050.

Some progress has been made globally since the Paris Agreement was signed in 2015. More than 85 new or updated Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to 2030, representing over 110 parties, have been submitted to set out how countries will cut their emissions and address the climate crisis. However, today’s report shows that more action is urgently needed.

In a meeting with scientists later today (Monday 9th August) Alok Sharma will encourage countries that have not already done so, to urgently submit new or updated NDCs with their plans for ambitious climate action ahead of the vital COP26 summit later this year in Glasgow, particularly the major economies of the G20 who are responsible for over 80% of global emissions.

In response to the report, Mr Sharma said:

The science is clear, the impacts of the climate crisis can be seen around the world and if we don’t act now, we will continue to see the worst effects impact lives, livelihoods and natural habitats.

Our message to every country, government, business and part of society is simple. The next decade is decisive, follow the science and embrace your responsibility to keep the goal of 1.5C alive.

We can do this together, by coming forward with ambitious 2030 emission reduction targets and long-term strategies with a pathway to net zero by the middle of the century, and taking action now to end coal power, accelerate the roll out of electric vehicles, tackle deforestation and reduce methane emissions.

UK International Champion on Adaptation and Resilience for the COP26 Presidency Anne-Marie Trevelyan said:

The impacts of climate change are already affecting lives and livelihoods around the world, with increasing frequency and severity. Alongside the need to drive down emissions, this report rings the alarm to urgently help vulnerable communities adapt and build resilience – in developed and developing countries alike.

Protecting the most vulnerable is a priority for the UK’s COP26 Presidency. World leaders must heed the science and work together to adapt to our changing climate, as well as act to avert, minimise and address loss and damage for those on the frontline.

https://twitter.com/carorackete/status/1424663289133477889?s=21

#AceNewsDesk report …….Published: Aug.09: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#cop26-global-warming, #climate-change, #emmisions, #ipcc, #worldwide

(WORLDWIDE) #GlobalWarming leading to #ClimateChange report due out from IPCC that will highlight the ‘stark reality’ rising temperatures and destruction of our eco-system #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Aug.08: UN researchers are set to publish their strongest statement yet on the science of climate change: The report will likely detail significant changes to the world’s oceans, ice caps and land in the coming decades: It is expected the forthcoming Summary for Policymakers will be a key document for global leaders when they meet in November….

#AceDailyNews says due out on Monday, the report has been compiled by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): Which will highlight ‘stark reality’ of ‘Global Warming’ thats leading to #ClimateChange in readiness for a last ditch chance for leaders meeting at #COP26 to do anything at all except make more #ProfitB4People …..Next? ….

By Matt McGrath
Environment correspondent

fire

It will be their first global assessment on the science of global heating since 2013.

The politicians are due to gather for a climate summit, known as COP26, in Glasgow.

After two weeks of virtual negotiations between scientists and representatives of 195 governments, the IPCC will launch the first part of a three-pronged assessment of the causes, impacts and solutions to climate change.

It is the presence of these government officials that makes the IPCC different from other science bodies. After the report has been approved in agreement with governments, they effectively take ownership of it. 

On Monday, a short, 40-page Summary for Policymakers will be released dealing with the physical science. 

ReutersThe IPCC will also look at the state of the Arctic as the climate warms

It may be brief, but the new report is expected to pack a punch.

“We’ve seen over a couple of months, and years actually, how climate change is unfolding; it’s really staring us in the face,” said Dr Heleen de Coninck, from Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, who is a coordinating lead author for the IPCC Working Group III. 

“It’s really showing what the impacts will be, and this is just the start. So I think what this report will add is a big update of the state of the science, what temperature increase are we looking at – and what are the physical impacts of that?” 

So what can we expect from the upcoming report?

According to many observers, there have been significant improvements in the science in the last few years, 

“Our models have gotten better, we have a better understanding of the physics and the chemistry and the biology, and so they’re able to simulate and project future temperature changes and precipitation changes much better than they were,” said Dr Stephen Cornelius from WWF, an observer at IPCC meetings.

“Another change has been that attribution sciences have increased vastly in the last few years. We can make greater links between climate change and extreme weather events.” 

As well as updates on temperature projections, there will likely be a strong focus on the question of humanity’s role in creating the climate crisis. 

In the last report in 2013, the IPCC said that humans were the “dominant cause” of global warming since the 1950s.

Thomas LohnesCars wrecked in a flood in Germany

It’s expected that this time the IPCC will also outline just how much of an influence humans are having on the oceans, the atmosphere and other aspects of our planetary systems. 

One of the most important questions concerns sea-level rise. This has long been a controversial issue for the IPCC, with their previous projections scorned by some scientists as far too conservative.

“In the past they have been so reluctant to give a plausible upper limit on sea-level rise, and we hope that they finally come around this time,” said Prof Arthur Petersen, from UCL in London.

As the world has experienced a series of devastating fires and floods in recent months that have been linked to climate change, the report will also include a new chapter linking extreme weather events to rising temperatures. 

Many have welcomed this development.

“I remain hopeful that the scientific evidence will show the stark reality of a world already altered by our rapidly changing climate and will motivate all nations to deliver urgent emission reductions and the necessary amount of climate finance at COP26,” said Mohammed Adjei Sowah, who is the mayor of Accra in Ghana and vice chair of the C40 group of cities.

“We only need to look out of our windows to see that the climate crisis is already here. Cities such as Accra and nations such as Ghana, which have contributed the least to greenhouse gas emissions, will experience many of the greatest impacts.”

One of the things that gives the report additional muscle is the fact that it is not just one particular research paper on one topic – the reviewers consider all the research carried out on each area of focus. 

Getty ImagesIn Japan, misting sprays are used to keep people cool

“Sometimes the IPCC gets criticised for being focused on consensus, and it’s suggested that this can weaken statements,” said Dr Emily Shuckburgh, from the University of Cambridge.

“But the fact that it is a summary across multiple lines of evidence is incredibly powerful and incredibly useful.”

One key question in the new summary will be about the 1.5C temperature target. The climate summit held in the French capital, Paris, in 2015, committed nations to try to limit the rise in global temperature from pre-industrial times to no more than 1.5 degrees. 

And in 2018, the IPCC released a special report on keeping to this target.

“That report showed very clearly was that there are clear, clear benefits to limiting warming to 1.5C and those benefits have only become clearer over the past three years,” said Dr de Coninck, who was one of the key authors of that study.

“If this report says something about that temperature limit in relation to emissions and how they are developing, it will have a political influence on COP26 I think.”

With just a few months to go until world leaders meet in Glasgow for the climate conference that is seen as the most important since the Paris agreement came into being in 2015, this new report will be required reading for all attendees.

“I think it’s going to be a wake-up call, there’s no doubt about that,” said Richard Black, an honorary research fellow at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London.

“But then again, so are some of the real world events that we’re seeing around us at the moment.”

#AceNewsDesk report ……Published: Aug.08: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#cop26, #globalwarming, #england, #ipcc

(LONDON) #COP26 Reality Check Report: Rich nations “must deliver now” on long-promised funding to help poorer countries fight climate change, says the President of the 26th United Nations #ClimateChange Conference which takes place in Glasgow in November #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.27: The UK will host the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) at the Scottish Event Campus (SEC) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021: The climate talks will bring together heads of state, climate experts and campaigners to agree coordinated action to tackle climate change: As COP26 Presidency, the UK is committed to working with all countries and joining forces with civil society, companies and people on the frontline of climate change to inspire action ahead of #COP26.

#COP26 #ClimateChange……How much is the developing world getting to fight climate change ? Net zero targets are ‘pie in the sky’ So what will really be the result of another group of rich nations sitting down eating expensive meals in expensive hotels and backed by so many companies who caused the problem …..It has become “a matter of trust”, Alok Sharma says please Go to the COP26 website for more information.

By Chris Morris
Reality Check Correspondent

The developed world had pledged to provide $100bn (£720m) a year by 2020, but this has still not been achieved so what’s next….?

Climate finance was discussed at length during a meeting in London of ministers and officials from more than fifty countries, 

According to the senior UN climate representative Patricia Espinosa, developing countries “were very insistent and very clear in their messages” that they expect commitments made up to 2020 to be met. 

It is going to be hard enough for rich countries to adjust to the need to remove fossil fuels and carbon from their own economies. 

But it is going to be a lot more challenging in developing nations, where there is far less money to pay for new infrastructure and technology. 

And there are an awful lot of people under threat.

So funding is needed for:

  • adaptation – adjusting to the growing effects of climate change
  • mitigation – reducing the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere

How much has been promised?

As long ago as 2009, the developed world agreed it would provide $100bn a year by 2020 to help poorer countries:

  • deal with the effects of climate change 
  • build greener economies in the future 

But, although official figures have not yet been released, an expert reportcommissioned by the United Nations concludes the target has not been reached – even though a new and more ambitious target is now supposed to be set for 2025. 

“The $100bn commitment should be seen as a floor not a ceiling,” lead author Amar Bhattacharya, from the Brookings Institution, says.

“Some progress has been made – but a lot more needs to be done.”

For many countries, this is the biggest issue to resolve in the run-up to Cop26 – and the very poorest are demanding action.

How far short are the pledges? 

It is quite hard to calculate what money should be included in the overall figure, because it is a complicated mix of money from governments, international lenders and private companies.

But the UN and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) estimate the total had reached nearly $79bn by 2018 – and failed to reach $100bn by 2020. 

Building towards the $100bn target. Climate finance provided for developing countries/$bn.  .

Between 2016 and 2018, 43% of the funding went to Asia, 25% to Africa and 17% to the Americas – a lot of it spent on green energy or transport infrastructure. 

But far more will be needed.

Who is not paying enough?

The rich countries recognise they have not yet met the target they set themselves. 

“Within the G7 [group of rich countries], the three countries that have been the leaders are Germany, Japan and France in that order,” Mr Bhattacharya says. 

The UK and Canada are slightly behind them – but the two big laggards are the United States and, particularly, Italy. 

ReutersThe UK will be hosting Cop26

In April, the US announced it would double its 2016 climate-finance contributions to $5.7bn by 2025 – but compared with the size of its economy, that is still very small. 

Meanwhile, Italy provides only about $0.6bn per year.

Both countries have signed up to a big push to increase the overall amount of money provided, but that will need domestic political approval. 

“President Biden has indicated to me his total commitment to helping to make that happen,” US Climate Envoy John Kerry says. 

“If they [the developed world] do not come together and produce that, it is going to be exceedingly hard to get any kind of broad-based agreement.”

So there is an expectation further announcements will be made between now and Cop26. And ministers from Germany and Canada have been tasked with developing a “credible delivery plan” to make sure the $100bn figure is achieved. 

But experts say that should be only the beginning. 

Dr Alina Averchenkova, from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, says: “$100bn isn’t going to do it – we need to move trillions in both public and private money. 

“The pandemic has shown us it can be done when there is the political will. 

“Unfortunately, climate change is quickly becoming the same kind of emergency – and it will be with us for the long term.” 

Are there any strings attached to the money?

Yes. By 2018, about three-quarters of the government money made available for climate action in developing countries was in the form of loans that need to be paid back, rather than grants that do not. 

The share of grants was higher to the very poorest countries – but still less than half the total. 

And that is a big problem in countries, many already heavily in debt, where Covid has made access to international funds even more pressing.

“Developing countries cannot just rely on loans, so it is going to be really important that more climate finance is provided in grants,” Dr Averchenkova says. 

“It’s never going to be the whole amount – but it needs to be more.”

So it is the quality as well as the quantity of funding that matters. 

And the message from the world’s poorer countries is pretty simple – if you want ambitious climate targets, you are going to have to pay for them.

#AceNewsDesk report ……Published: July.27: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts from Twitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#profitb4people, #glasgow, #london

(WORLDWIDE) #AceWeatherReport – After another punishing weekend of sweltering temperatures across much of the U.S. a heat dome will produce highs above average this week for large swaths of the country, while several wildfires in the West continue to wreak havoc on communities #AceWeatherDesk report

#AceWeatherReport – July.27: The Great Plains and Midwest — along with parts of the East — . And in places where residents must also cope with high humidity, those temperatures could feel like they have reached triple digits….

#AceDailyNews says Both Sides of the Pond: As floods, heat, then floods again: England is battered by wild weather as much of the USA suffers heat dome as #GlobalWarming creates more instances of #ClimateChange following the recent California Wildfires last week …..and it spreads worldwide as #COP26 prepares with all leaders making promises but will they keep them before its too late or is it too late already ?

Updated: July 26, 2021, 7:40 a.m. ET13 minutes ago

Extreme Weather and Climate Updates

Britain Weather
http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/london-weather-met-office-issues-warnings-as-thunderstorms-and-torrential-rain-forecast-for-capital-a2482161.html

Residents used buckets, brooms and wooden boards to create makeshift flood defences for their homes as storm drains were overloaded in parts of the city.

“Having been born and raised in London, I have never seen anything quite like it,” said south London resident Eddie Elliott. “It stands out as the worst I’ve experienced personally … totally shut down the whole road with buses stood broken down in the water.”

The rain followed a spell of hot, sunny weather that sent Britons to lakes and the sea in search of relief.

Earlier this month a wave of storms caused huge flooding damage and left more than 200 people dead in Germany and Belgium.

US States are suffering more wildfires with a heat dome expected this week …..

Fire crews assigned to the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon on Sunday. The fire, the nation’s largest, has now consumed more than 400,000 acres.
Fire crews assigned to the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon on Sunday. The fire, the nation’s largest, has now consumed more than 400,000 acres.Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

An excessive heat warning was in place for parts of Idaho, Montana and Oregon through Tuesday, . Billings, Mont., could see temperatures , and nearby locations could reach 110. Boise, Idaho, is on Monday, but cool down slightly as the week progresses. A heat advisory was also in effect for Monday and Tuesday for parts of Louisiana and Texas and up through South Dakota.

The nation’s largest wildfire, the Bootleg Fire in southwest Oregon, grew over the weekend and has now burned about 408,000 acres. “The progress that we have made is due to the continuous, vigilant work by our crews,” Joe Hessel, an incident commander for the Oregon Department of Forestry, . “Severe fire weather conditions and extremely dry fuels continue to challenge us on this fire.”

Dozens of are actively burning across the Western United States, charring large swaths of land in recent days, according to a New York Times analysis of government and satellite data. Some are threatening thousands of people who live and work just a few miles away.

As the fire season gets underway, The Times built an interactive map to track the latest wildfires as they spread across Western states. Check back regularly for updates.

— , ,  and 

A sandstorm caused a 20-vehicle pileup between Salt Lake City and St George, Utah, that left at least seven people dead and others critically injured, the Utah Highway Patrol said.
A sandstorm caused a 20-vehicle pileup between Salt Lake City and St George, Utah, that left at least seven people dead and others critically injured, the Utah Highway Patrol said.Utah Highway Patrol

At least seven people were killed and several others were injured when in southwestern Utah on Sunday afternoon, state officials said.

The Utah Highway Patrol said it appeared that in the crash “after high winds caused a sand or dust storm and impaired visibility on the roadway.”

“No one could see, so people started stopping, and then you just get a chain reaction,” Trooper Andrew Battenfield, a spokesman for the Highway Patrol, said late Sunday night. “Nobody could see, and then all of a sudden, you’re slamming into a car,” he said. “It’s just a horrific situation.”

Several people were taken to local hospitals in critical condition, officials said.

The crash, which happened around 5 p.m. local time, prompted the closure of parts of Interstate 15 in Millard County, between Salt Lake City and St. George. The Highway Patrol said the road would be closed in the area for a “significant time.”

A flooded road following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province, China.
A flooded road following heavy rainfall in Zhengzhou, Henan province, China.Aly Song/Reuters

China floods leaves flooded farmland in heaviest rains for a decade and parts of Henan province ….

China’s breakneck growth over the last four decades erected soaring cities where there had been hamlets and farmland. The cities lured factories, and the factories lured workers. The boom lifted hundreds of millions of people out of the poverty and rural hardship they once faced.

Now those cities face the daunting new challenge of adapting , a possibility that few gave much thought to when the country began its extraordinary economic transformation. China’s pell-mell, brisk urbanization has in some ways made the challenge harder to face.

No one weather event can be directly linked to climate change, but that flooded Zhengzhou and other cities in central China last week, killing at least 69 as of Monday, reflects a that has seen deadly flooding recently in Germany and Belgium, and extreme heat and wildfires in Siberia. The flooding in China also highlights the environmental vulnerabilities that accompanied the country’s economic boom and could yet undermine it.

China has already taken some steps to begin to address climate change. Xi Jinping is the country’s first leader to make the issue a national priority.

As early as 2013, Mr. Xi promised to build an “ecological civilization” in China. “We must maintain harmony between man and nature and pursue sustainable development,” he said in a in Geneva in 2013.

London cleans up after flash flooding drenches homes, subway

Roads flooded in London after a heavy rain on Sunday.
Roads flooded in London after a heavy rain on Sunday.Justin Tallis/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

LONDON: Londoners were cleaning up on Monday (Jul 26) after torrential rain left homes, roads and several subway stations flooded, the second unseasonal inundation in as many weeks.

The Met Office weather agency said 41.6cm of rain fell in central London on Sunday afternoon. Monday was drier, but the Environment Agency said four flood warnings remained in place for southeast England.

Two London hospitals asked patients not to come to the emergency department because of disruption from the floods.

Transport for London said eight stations were closed because of flooding, including Pudding Mill Lane, an above-ground station where video footage showed water surging through a concourse and up stairs.

For the second time in a matter of two weeks, heavy rainfall has wreaked havoc across London, flooding train stations, stranding motorists and forcing at least two hospitals to redirect patients from their emergency rooms.

The downpour, which dumped about a month’s worth of rain in some areas on Sunday, came at the tail end of a heat wave that had led Public Health England to issue an alert for the first time ever warning people to stay cool indoors, close curtains in rooms that face the sun, drink plenty of water and avoid excess alcohol.

The heat broke as thunderstorms swept across southern England this weekend, bringing torrential downpours that dumped a month’s worth of rain in some areas in just a few hours.

The London Fire Brigade wrote on Twitter that it had responded to more than 1,000 calls as people needed to be rescue from cars suddenly submerged or escape homes as the waters rose. Heavy rainfall flooded emergency departments of Newham Hospital and led to “operational issues” at Whipps Cross Hospital. And service on the London Underground was disrupted as water poured into several stations.

Thames Water, a company responsible for Greater London’s sewage and water services, said on Monday that the rainfall had led to surface flooding and that crews had been working through the night to make repairs.

By Monday morning, the floodwaters had largely subsided, though Britain’s weather service said that warnings remained in effect in parts of the country.

While individual weather events are hard to directly attribute to climate change, there is now broad scientific agreement that the extreme weather the world is experiencing this summer is being fueled by those changes.

#AceNewsDesk report ……Published: July.27: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#england, #usa

(GENEVA) #ClimateChange IPCC Report:The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is preparing the most comprehensive assessment on the state of global heating since 2013 #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.27: Against a backdrop of fires and floods, researchers are meeting virtually to finalise a key climate science study.

#AceDailyNews reports that Climate Change: Researchers have started discussions on a vital report: Media registration for Working Group I contribution to Sixth Assessment Report: Over the next two weeks, the scientists will go through their findings line by line with representatives of 195 governments.

Updated on 20 July to change the starting time of the opening ceremony from 10.00am CEST to 11.00am CEST.

GENEVA, July 8 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) will consider the Working Group I contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) at a session to be held virtually from 26 July to 6 August 2021. Working Group I assesses the physical science basis of climate change: Formally the meeting in July and August consists of sessions of both the IPCC and of Working Group I. …….The 14th Session of Working Group I will consider the Summary for Policymakers of the report for approval in line-by-line scrutiny by government representatives in dialogue with report authors and accept the underlying scientific-technical assessment. Then the 54th Session of the IPCC will accept the work of the Working Group, formally accepting the report.

heat
As the scientists gather to consider their report, heatwaves are hitting many parts of the world

By Matt McGrath
Environment correspondent

Experts say the report will be a “wake-up call” to governments: It is expected that the short, 40-page Summary for Policymakers will play an important role in guiding global leaders who will come to Glasgow in November to deal with critical climate questions.

Alok Sharma brings 51 countries together for critical climate discussions ahead of #COP26

Ministers to lay groundwork for success before November’s summit

  • Ministers arrive in London to discuss key issues that require resolution at COP26
  • COP26 President hopes to build common ground and sketch the outline of the Glasgow outcome ahead of summit
  • US, India, China among 50+ countries represented at two-day ministerial meeting in a combination of virtual and in-person attendance

Today [Sunday] the COP26 President-Designate, Alok Sharma, will bring climate and environment ministers and representatives from more than 50 countries together to lay the groundwork for success ahead of November’s COP26 negotiations.

The event marks the first face-to-face ministerial of its kind in more than 18 months. With fewer than 100 days to go until the critical UN climate change conference, Mr Sharma is convening the meeting in London to shape the vision of the final outcomes from COP26, and build a “unity of purpose to deliver them”.

The two-day meeting will see major emitters like the US and China in discussion with countries that are most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, such as Jamaica, Costa Rica, Rwanda and The Marshall Islands.

The ministerial will cover the UK COP Presidency’s key goal of keeping the critical 1.5C temperature rise limit alive. Topics under discussion include mobilising climate finance, scaling up efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change, loss and damage caused by climate change, and finalising the “rulebook” for implementation of the Paris Agreement, with a focus on Article 6, which sets out how countries can reduce emissions using international carbon markets and non-market approaches.

As the world has warmed over the past 30 years, the IPCC has become the most important platform for summarising the state of scientific understanding of the problem, its impacts and solutions. 

This year, though, the panel’s report takes places as extreme weather events have shaken the US and Canada, Europe and Asia. The question of the role played by human-induced climate change is being asked more loudly than ever. 

What does the IPCC do and how is it relevant to me?

Formed in 1988, the IPCC’s role is to provide politicians with assessments every six or seven years on the science, the impacts and the potential options for tackling climate change. 

Over the years, its reports have become more strongly worded as the evidence has mounted. 

Justin SullivanDrought in California has seen water levels in Lake Oroville drop to record lows

In 2013, its assessment said that humans were the “dominant cause” of global warming since the 1950s.

That document helped set the scene for the Paris climate agreement signed in 2015. 

As well as its six- or seven-year assessments, the IPCC has also produced special studies looking at specific scientific questions. 

In 2018, the IPCC released a special report on keeping global temperature rise under 1.5C

This document has had a significant impact on an emerging generation of young people, willing to take to the streets to demand a political response.

“The 1.5C report was really kind of instrumental for young people to use that science to marshal their efforts towards action,” said Ko Barrett, a vice chair of the IPCC and a head of research at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa).

Getty ImagesIn Japan, misting sprays are used to keep people cool

“I think maybe the report surprised us all, that the report had such an impact in getting people to think, wow, this is not some big future problem. This is like right now.”

The IPCC’s latest summary of the science, to be published on 9 August, is also likely to have a big impact. 

In a couple of months, world leaders will come to Glasgow to try to advance the world’s efforts against rising temperatures. The IPCC’s forthcoming report will be required reading for many attending COP26.

“I think it’s going to be a wake-up call, there’s no doubt about that,” said Richard Black, an honorary research fellow at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London.

“But then again, so are some of the real world events that we’re seeing around us at the moment.”

Is the IPCC just about scientists?

Many people think that the IPCC is just a platform for science, but that’s not the full picture. 

“The IPCC itself actually consists of representatives from 195 governments in all, and they basically commission the reports from the various groups of academics that do the work,” said Richard Black.

“And this to me is the key thing about the IPCC. It’s not just a bunch of scientists producing a report; they are commissioned by governments, and they’re owned by governments. And that makes them absolutely unique.”

So how does it work?

The IPCC, while it has undoubted clout, doesn’t actually conduct its own research.

For its assessments, the IPCC divides the work into three different areas. The first is the physical science report, the second the study on impacts, the third is on mitigation.

The impacts and mitigation studies will come out early next year, as well as a synthesis report that will pull all the threads together.

Getty ImagesFirefighters tackle the Bootleg fire in Oregon

For the upcoming publication on the physical science, more than 200 researchers been working together in groups to review the existing peer-reviewed literature over the last four years.

Their initial draft reports were subject to discussions and comments from fellow researchers and from governments. 

The new study attracted around 75,000 comments as it was drafted and re-written.

Over the next two weeks, a final Summary for Policymakers, running to around 40 pages, will be agreed word by word with government representatives. 

“The scientists come in with a proposal document that line by line gets challenged by the representative of the United Nations there, and the scientists defend their lines,” said Prof Corinne Le Quéré, from the University of East Anglia who has been involved with two previous IPCC assessment reports.

“Nothing gets written that is not scientifically correct. So, scientists have the right to just say this is wrong, and the documents gets really strong at the end because of that process.”

One of the things that gives the report additional muscle is the fact that it is not just one particular research paper on one topic – the reviewers consider all the pieces of research carried out on each area of focus. 

“Sometimes the IPCC gets criticised for being focussed on consensus, and it’s suggested that that can weaken statements,” said Dr Emily Shuckburgh, from the University of Cambridge.

“But the fact that it is a summary across multiple lines of evidence is incredibly powerful and incredibly useful.”

So what can we expect from the upcoming report?

As in previous assessments, there will likely be a strong focus on the question of humanity’s role in creating the climate crisis. 

In the last report in 2013, the authors said that warming since the 1950s was “extremely likely” due to human activities. 

This will likely be further strengthened, despite the objections of some countries.

ReutersDriving through a wildfire in Nevada

“It’s going to revise this overall attribution statement. Obviously, it is going to be stronger than what we had in the past because of the growing warming of the planet,” said Prof Le Quéré.

“That’s going to be one of the main points. It will be discussed very, very carefully, and scrutinised. You can be sure it will be scrutinised by governments.”

However, many participants are likely to be more concerned with the present and the future than questions of past responsibility. 

There will be a new chapter on weather and extreme events in a changing climate.

Many will want to pay more attention to questions such as storms, floods or droughts with a low probability but high impact, as have been seen around the world in recent weeks.

“This time around, governments have asked the IPCC to also look at low probability events that could be potentially very damaging,” said Prof Le Quéré.

“So we can expect a lot more information. In fact, for almost the first time in the IPCC, (we’ll get) a lot more explicit information about the risks of extreme climate events.”

ReutersThe IPCC will also look at the state of the Arctic as the climate warms

As well as new information on sea-level rise and the state of the Arctic and Antarctic, the summary report will likely have new information on the chances of holding the global rise in temperatures to 1.5C this century. 

It will assess whether governments are on track to meet the targets agreed in the Paris climate pact. 

What could possibly go wrong?

This is the first time that the IPCC has attempted an approval session remotely. These gatherings are usually a week long and often involve quite vigorous discussions between government representatives and scientists. 

With just a few months left before the COP26 climate conference, the stakes for the participants are perhaps higher than at any time in recent history. 

Given the scale of weather-related disasters we are witnessing around the world, the public and politicians are now more attuned to the issue of climate change than ever before.

All this will add to the pressure on the IPCC. There are likely many long nights ahead for the participants.

#AceNewsDesk report …..Published: July.27: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#climatechange, #geneva

(CALIFORNIA) #Wildfires Report: It is one of more than 85 blazes wreaking havoc in the country – mostly in the western region – with thousands of homes under threat and a state of emergency declared in parts of the state #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.25: Smoke from dozens of blazes in the western USA is now coming to the aid of firefighters battling the mounting devastation across the region……

#AceDailyNews says smoke from wildfires is so huge it’s actually helping army of firefighters as fumes pouring into the air have been providing ‘smoke shade’ in some areas – which provides cooler conditions and temporarily blocks the sun.

By of METROUK Sunday: 25 Jul 2021 11:11 am

Wildfires in California
METRO UK California’s largest wildfire tore through a tiny neighbourhood on Saturday (Picture: AP)

That has allowed an army of firefighters to gain ground on the country’s largest blaze in Oregon, though elsewhere the scene is far bleaker. 

California’s largest wildfire tore through a tiny neighbourhood on Saturday, destroying homes and livelihoods as various blazes continued to devastate the west.

The Dixie fire had already levelled more than a dozen homes and other buildings before reaching the Indian Falls community.

It is one of more than 85 blazes wreaking havoc in the country – mostly in the western region – with thousands of homes under threat and a state of emergency declared in parts of California.

The active fires have so far burned 1.4 million acres of land across the USA, as an army of firefighters battle another devastating fire season worsened by the climate crisis.

A home burns as the Dixie fire rips through the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 24, 2021.
The Dixie tore through Indian Falls on Saturday (Picture: AFP)
Firefighters try to get control of the scene as the Dixie fire burns dozens of homes in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 24, 2021.
Firefighters are struggling to control California’s largest wildfire (Picture: AFP)
A Corvette explodes as flames from the Dixie fire tears through the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 24, 2021.
A Corvette explodes as flames from the Dixie fire batter communities (Picture: AFP)

Dixie, which ignited on July 14, was burning in a remote area where firefighters struggled to gain access as it charged eastwards.

It was burning in a remote area where firefighters struggled to check its advance eastwards, after so far scorching more than 181,000 acres in Plumas and Butte Counties.

Residents in several small communities and along the west shore of Lake Almano have been told to evacuate, though others across the region have ignored similar orders.

Meanwhile, the nation’s largest wildfire, Oregon’s colossal Bootleg fire, was almost halfway surrounded on Saturday – but thousands of homes remains threatened to its east.

The huge amount of smoke emitted across the region has helped firefighters slow the growth of the sprawling blaze – one of the largest in the state’s history – but authorities remain fearful about its progress.

A firefighter sprays water at a burning home as flames climb up a tree during the Dixie fire in the Indian Falls neighborhood of unincorporated Plumas County, California on July 24, 2021.
A firefighter sprays water at a burning home as flames climb up a huge tree (Picture: AFP)
A firefighter prepares to battle the Dixie Fire, which was tearing through the Indian Falls community in Plumas County, Calif., Saturday, July 24, 2021.
Firefighters across the western USA are battling dozens of huge fires (Picture: AP)

Jim Hanson, a fire behaviour analyst from the Oregon Department of Forestry, explained: ‘This fire is resistant to stopping at dozer lines.

‘With the critically dry weather and fuels we are experiencing, firefighters are having to constantly re-evaluate their control lines and look for contingency options.’

In California, Governor Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency for four northern counties because of wildfires that he said were causing ‘conditions of extreme peril to the safety of persons and property’.

Climate change has been blamed for worsening the conditions needed to start and fuel fires – with manmade global warming making the US West much warmer and drier over the past 30 years.

Elsewhere, hundreds of homes are threatened in north-central Washington, where firefighters are battling two blazes in Okanogan County which caused hazardous air quality conditions on Saturday.

A man rides his bike passed a gas station as smoke fills the sky during the Dixie fire in Greenville, California on July 23, 2021.
Air quality has become really poor in some parts of the USA (Picture: AFP)
Residents drink and listen to country music in the street while ignoring a mandatory evacuation order as the Dixie fire approaches in Greenville, California on July 23, 2021.
Some residents, including these in Greenville, California, have ignored evacuation orders – instead drinking and listening to country music in the street (Picture: AFP)

The Alder Creek fire in south-west Montana had already charred more than 6,800 acres by Saturday night – when it was 10% contained and threatening nearly 240 homes.

In California, the Tamarack blaze, south of Lake Tahoe, continued to burn devastate woodland and threaten communities on the Nevada border. Air quality there has also deteriorated to very unhealthy levels.

Heavy smoke from that fire and Dixie has reduced visibility and even grounded some aircraft supporting fire crews.

A theme park had to be evacuated in northern Idaho on Friday thanks to a small fire which was half contained by Saturday when the venue reopened.

Looking ahead, forecasters say hot weather and afternoon winds could continue to spread the blazes but there is a chance of scattered thunderstorms in California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and other states. However, weather experts warned that some could be dry thunderstorms that produce little rain but a lot of lightning, which can spark new blazes.

#AceNewsDesk report ……..Published: July.24: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#cop26, #globalwarming, #blaze, #california, #climatechange, #firefighters, #wildfires