United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Today Called for Innovative Thinking to Measure and Cut Global Food Loss and Waste Which They Said is Essential to Advance the Fight to Eliminate Hunger

English: Logo of the Food and Agriculture Orga...

English: Logo of the Food and Agriculture Organization (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceFoodNews says the head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recently called for innovative thinking to measure and cut global food loss and waste which he said is essential to advance the fight to eliminate hunger.

FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva <“http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/203149/icode/“>told participants at the Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) in Copenhagen that an estimated one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted – around 1.3 billion tons. This costs around $750 billion annually.

“If we reduce food loss and waste to zero it would give us additional food to feed 2 billion people,” said Mr. Graziano da Silva, who joined leaders of partner agencies to discuss plans for a new global standard for measuring food loss and waste announced at 3GF by the World Resources Institute (WRI).

“One of my priorities in FAO is opening our doors to potential allies. Fighting food loss and waste is clearly one area in which partnership is needed. Developing a global protocol can help provide clear measurements and indicators on which we can base guidance on how to reduce food loss and waste,” he stated.

English: The logo of the Food and Agriculture ...

English: The logo of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, white and red (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

FAO noted that most food loss takes place in post-production, harvesting, transportation and storage. In developing countries, food waste is mainly related to inadequate infrastructure, while in more developed countries it is largely a problem in the marketing and consumption stages.

“We already know a lot about how to cut food losses,” said the Director-General. “But we need to invest more in a number of areas, especially in infrastructure such as roads and cold chains, but also improving market information. We also need to close the gap between the knowledge we have and what farmers and other actors in the food chain are actually doing.”

He called for more “innovative thinking” to keep retailers and each household from throwing food away. Per capita consumer waste is around 100 kilograms in Europe and North America per year. In Africa, it is less than 10 kilograms a year per person.

FAO works on numerous initiatives to reduce the loss of food in the agricultural process and throughout the food system ‘from field to fork.’

It launched the SAVE FOOD initiative together with the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and Messe Dusseldorf to reduce food loss and waste along the entire chain of food production and consumption.

This image shows all countries classified as &...

This image shows all countries classified as “Food Insecure” by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, FAO, between 2003 and 2005. more than 5% of the people have insufficient food more than 15% of the people have insufficient food more than 25% of the people have insufficient food more than 35% of the people have insufficient food more than 50% of the people have insufficient food (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It also collaborates with UNEP, WRAP (Waste and Resources Action Programme) and other partners in the Think.Eat.Save. campaign designed to target and change wasteful practices, especially at the retail and consumer end of the food-supply chain.

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“High-Seas Fisheries Support the Food Security and Livelihoods of Millions of People Worldwide,”

English: A Food and Agriculture Organization (...

English: A Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) postage meter marking. Airmail letter from Italy to the U.S., 2007. Detail (FAO logo) Русский: Штамп франкировальной машины (Продовольственная и сельскохозяйственная организация ООН (ФАО), 2007). Письмо авиапочты из Италии в США. Деталь (логотип ФАО) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) just recently hailed a multi-partner project focused on improving global sustainable tuna fisheries by reducing illegal catch and supporting biodiversity in the common oceans.

“High-seas fisheries support the food security and livelihoods of millions of people worldwide,” Árni M. Mathiesen, FAO Assistant Director-General for Fisheries and Aquaculture said in a <“http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/204028/icode/“>statement announcing that Global Environment Facility (GEF) CEO Naoko Ishii has approved a project coordinated by FAO to boost the sustainability of tuna fisheries worldwide.

According to FAO, around one-third of the world’s seven major tuna species are currently overexploited. Given continued strong consumer demand and the overcapacity of fishing fleets, the status of tuna stocks is likely to deteriorate further if fisheries management is not improved.

“Through collective action at all levels and broad cooperation that optimizes the use of scarce resources, this project – and the wider Common Oceans initiative – will help move the world away from ‘the race to fish’ and towards implementation of an ecosystem approach,” said Mr. Mathiesen, stressing that it is vital to ensure the future well-being and productivity of these crucial marine ecosystems.

“Early successes will create incentives for donors and agencies to further invest in these types of catalytic projects.” he added.

By creating synergy between FAO and its global partners, the global tuna project on fisheries management and biodiversity conservation, set to run from 2013 through 2018, is vital to advance more sustainable and efficient fisheries management and to share the best fishing practices; to reduce illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing through reinforced monitoring and control; and to lessen ecological impacts from illegal fishing.

This image shows all countries classified as &...

This image shows all countries classified as “Food Insecure” by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, FAO, between 2003 and 2005. more than 5% of the people have insufficient food more than 15% of the people have insufficient food more than 25% of the people have insufficient food more than 35% of the people have insufficient food more than 50% of the people have insufficient food (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The GEF, an international organization specialized on environment and sustainable development, has committed $30 million in support of the program, leveraging an addition $150 million of co-financing.

“I am pleased that we are able to bring together both public and private partners in this project, which give us a fighting chance to work on a scale sufficient to reverse negative trends threatening the global tuna fishery and the ocean environment that sustains it” said Mr. Ishii, commented on GEF’s funding.

Further to the tuna project, key partners including FAO, the UN Environment Program (UNEP), the World Bank, Conservation International (CI), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), the World Wildlife Fund – US and the Global Oceans Forum are also involved in other relevant initiatives:

Increasing sustainable use of deep-sea living resources and ecosystems; strengthening global capacity to manage the areas beyond national jurisdiction  (ABNJ) and fuelling oceans partnerships to promote investment in long-term, sustainable fisheries management.

FAO estimates that tunas and tuna-like species account for the most valuable fishery resource caught in the areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ). About 5.4 million tonnes are landed each year, with over 85 countries harvesting tuna in commercial quantities. Capture levels are highest in the Pacific Ocean, followed by the Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

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BENIN: UN AGENCY PROGRAMME TO HELP FLOOD-HIT FARM COMMUNITIES REBOUND

United Nations The United Nations today launched an emergency response programme to support farmers in northern Benin who lost crops, livestock and fishing grounds when the region was hit by floods in August.

“This is emergency assistance with a longer-term view, in that it includes awareness raising and training on resilience for community members and local authorities, <“http://www.fao.org/news/story/en/item/203975/icode/“>said the Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), José Graziano da Silva, who was in the country to launch the programme.

“This can help shape a new approach that looks to the future beyond the short timeframe of immediate emergencies.”

Agriculture accounts for 70 per cent of employment in Benin. In the rural and impoverished northern region, families are even more dependent on agriculture and less able to cope with repeated setbacks.

Many of the villagers who were hit by the floods this year were only getting back on their get from the last floods in 2012. The Government estimates that crop losses alone are estimated at some $20 million. Due to the scale of the destruction, the Government has nearly exhausted its resources assisting victims with food, shelter and cash transfers, with little possibility to help re-launch the agricultural sector.

The emergency programme will launch immediately, assisting some 7,500 households that have been worst-affected by the floods by supplying quality seed for rice, off-season vegetables and maize, farming equipment, fertilizers, training in seed production and conservation, and storage infrastructure to reduce production losses.

Farmers will also be trained in modern technologies and best practices, such as micro-dosing of fertilizers, to increase production, reduce costs and protect the environment.

English: The logo of the Food and Agriculture ...

English: The logo of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, white and red (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

On Sunday, Mr. da Silva took part in a ceremony to immediately activate the emergency assistance in the northern villages of Malanville and Karimama, the worst affected by the flooding, where nearly all agricultural production was wiped out, and farmers were left with no crops and no seed for planting anew.

FAO said a portion of the emergency funding will go to rehabilitate the commercial activities of some 1,300 young people who had started farming under a Beninese Government programme for creating rural jobs and economic opportunity.

The programme’s resilience workshops will also benefit local community services by raising awareness of good agricultural practices, disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation and natural resources management.

 

#acefoodnews, #agriculture, #benin, #director-general, #fao, #flood, #food-and-agriculture-organization, #jose-graziano-da-silva, #malanville, #united-nations