SUDAN: ‘ President Bashir Barred from leaving South Africa on ICC Warrant ‘

#AceNewsReport – SUDAN:June.14: President of Sudan, Omar al-Bashir, may be arrested in Johannesburg, South Africa, on an International Criminal Court warrant on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity.

South Africa is legally obliged to arrest al-Bashir and hand him over to international authorities, ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said.

The ICC has ordered the Sudanese president to stay in S. Africa until a ruling is made about his arrest.

The Sudanese president came to power in 1989 as a result of a coup. Omar al-Bashir is accused of initiating a government campaign that resulted in the Darfur conflict, in which 300,000 people were killed and over 2 million displaced, according to United Nations figures.

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#2010-fifa-world-cup, #african-union, #arrest-warrant, #hague, #international-criminal-court, #johannesburg, #list-of-heads-of-state-of-sudan, #omar-al-bashir, #south-africa, #war-in-darfur

#AceWorldNews KIEV April 25 The International Criminal Court…

#AceWorldNews – KIEV – April 25 – The International Criminal Court has opened a preliminary investigation into alleged crimes committed during the deadly protests that led to the ouster of President Viktor Yanukovich on February 22.

Kiev’s coup-appointed government claims Yanukovich’s troops killed more than 100 protesters during the unrest.

#ans2014, #international-criminal-court, #kiev, #ukraine, #viktor-yanukovych

` Obama Authorises Deployment of ` Military Aircraft ' in Attempt to Continue Hunt for Warlord Kony '

#AceWorldNews – UGANDA – March 24 – In an expanded attempt to continue the hunt for warlord Joseph Kony, President Obama has authorized the deployment of military aircraft and about 150 Special Operations forces to Uganda.

According to the Washington Post, the administration notified Congress of the deployments as they began on Sunday, and the troop movement was later confirmed to Reuters by the Defence Department.

The move marks the first time that US military aircraft have been assigned to Uganda in order to help search for Kony, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court for war crimes.

Under Obama’s orders, at least four CV-22 Osprey aircraft are scheduled to arrive in the country by the middle of the week, alongside a contingent of 150 Air Force Special Operations troops, pilots, and maintenance forces.

The Post reports that the new influx of troops will “provide information, advice and assistance” to the African Union forces searching for Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army.

The troops are “combat-equipped,” but are barred from fighting the LRA themselves except in self-defence situations.

The aircraft, meanwhile, will be used to move troops from one location to another.

Reuters – Washington Post – RT – News Sources

Ace Related News
1. $5 million US price tag for info on Ugandan warlord Kony, manhunt suspended http://on.rt.com/qb2yzu
2. Joseph Kony forces children into sex slavery and violence – UN report http://on.rt.com/tuojb8
3. WikiLeaks: Kony 2012 creators spied for Uganda http://on.rt.com/yhonjh

#ANS2014

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#AceGuestNews and Views Brendan Cole VOR Two centuries…

#AceGuestNews and Views – Brendan Cole – VOR

Two centuries on from the abolition of slavery, the slave trade continues to make headlines. A coalition of 14 Caribbean heads of state is considering endorsing a proposal to seek financial reparation for 400 years of slavery. Martyn Day is a senior UK lawyer, who is one of those who have drawn up an action plan to try and bring a claim to the International Criminal Court next year.

The nations involved argue that a legacy of illiteracy, poor health and limited social opportunities in the region is a direct consequence of the centuries of Human trafficking.

Day explained that they were approached by the prime minister of St Vincent about helping them with the issue after they achieved compensation for the Mau Mau tortured by the British in Kenya in the 1950’s.

They agreed there was no prospect of a case for injuries suffered in the same way as with the Mau Mau, so the case is about the damage being suffered today.

“Even now in 2014, the Caribbean suffers a lot from what happened during the slave era,” he says. “Issues such as health, education, social welfare. The Caribbean nations have been hamstrung by their past. We would be saying to countries like Britain, France, Netherlands and other countries that they should play a role in trying to recompense and assist the Caribbean nations in trying to come into the 21st century.”
We pointed out that some of them may not agree.

“Of course, but we benefited massively from the money that was being made out of slaves back in the 16th, 17th, 18th century and at the same time we were handicapping both the African and Caribbean states.

#AceGuestViews of Brendan Cole

Audio SLAVE_TRADE_TWO_WAY.mp3

Read more: http://voiceofrussia.com/uk/news/2014_03_10/Slavery-UK-lawyers-assist-14-Caribbean-nations-in-push-for-ICC-claim-5832/

#african, #britain, #caribbean, #france, #human-trafficking, #icc, #international-criminal-court, #mau-mau, #netherlands, #slave-trade, #uk

#UN : ` Western Democracies who wield the most `Economic Power ‘ must bear responsibility for allowing War Crimes’

#AceWorldNews says that the countries that wield the greatest power must bear responsibility for allowing war crimes to persist in Syria, UN human-rights investigators said on Wednesday.

All sides in Syria’s civil war are using shelling and siege tactics to punish civilians, said the latest report documenting atrocities in Syria, Reuters said.

The investigators called again on the UN Security Council to refer grave violations of the rules of war to the International Criminal Court (ICC) for prosecution.

The 75-page report, covering July 15-January 20, is the seventh by the UN since the inquiry was set up in September 2011.

#ANS2014

#human-rights, #icc, #international-criminal-court, #reuters, #syria, #un, #un-security-council

#AceNewsDesk : ” World News – Latest Headlines – 21 January 2014″

Ace News Group

15:53

Syrian opposition forms delegation for Geneva 2 peace conference

The National Coalition for Revolutionary and Opposition Forces (NCROF) of Syria has formed a ten-member delegation for the Geneva 2 peace conference set to begin on Wednesday, Itar-Tass reports, citing the opposition groups official press service. NCROF leader Ahmed al-Jarboe will reportedly lead the delegation, with vice presidents Nur al- Amir and Abdel Hakim, along with Syrian national council board member Badr Dzharmus, set to participate. Louay Safi, chairman of the Syrian American Council, will also be present at Montreux.

15:32

​Pakistan militant bus bombing kills at least 18

A bomb, detonated near a convoy of buses in western Pakistan, has killed at least 18 Shiite pilgrims, according to initial reports. However, local officials told Reuters that at least 22 had died as a result of the blast. The groups on the bus were returning from an excursion to Iran, and were passing through the city of Quetta when the bomb detonated. A police officer, Mohammad Aslam, told AP that the likely death toll of 18 could rise as several of the 24 others injured were in a critical condition.

15:21

Spain retakes number three spot in world tourism

Spain announced on Tuesday that it retook the number three position in world tourism in 2013. The country overtook China by luring a record 60.6 million international visitors, AFP reported. Foreign tourist arrivals surged by 5.6 percent in the year, the government said, boosting the euro zone’s fourth largest economy. “The new figures for 2013 allow our country to retake the number three position in this indicator after having overtaken China,” Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said. Spain stood behind only France with 83 million international tourist arrivals and the US with 67 million.

14:50

Syrian opposition to demand removal of Assad in peace talks

Syria’s opposition group, the National Coalition, warned on Tuesday it would demand the removal of “criminal” President Bashar Assad. On his arrival in Switzerland ahead of a peace conference, Badr Jamous, secretary-general of the National Coalition and member of its negotiating team, said: “We will not accept less than the removal of the criminal Bashar Assad and changing the regime and holding the murderers accountable.” The regime in Damascus “does not deserve less than being sent to stand trial in front of the International Criminal Court,” he told Reuters.

14:15

Obama to visit pope in March

US President Barack Obama plans to visit Pope Francis at the Vatican in March during a trip to Europe, Reuters reported. The president is scheduled to meet with the pope on March 27, the White House said on Tuesday. The trip will include stops in the Netherlands, Belgium and Italy.

13:56

Senegal releases Russia’s trawler

The authorities in Senegal have released the Oleg Naidyonov trawler which was detained by Senegalese servicemen and convoyed to Dakar’s port in early January. Yury Parshev, director of the Murmansk company Phoenix that owns the ship, told Interfax that the authorities were ready to stand bail for the detained trawler. The Russian Foreign Ministry had demanded immediate release of trawler.

13:24

Gunmen briefly hold 60 Afghan de-miners hostage

Armed men briefly held about 60 de-miners hostage in the northwest of Afghanistan on Tuesday before an operation by security forces freed them, AFP reported. The mine clearance workers, all Afghans, working for the British Halo Trust, were taken by gunmen from a camp in the Pashtun Zarghun district of Herat province. Halo said the kidnappers were not Taliban members. Sediq Sediqqi, spokesman for the interior ministry said that all the abducted de-miners have been freed.

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Universal Ratification of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

#AceWorldNews says the history of the establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) spans over more than a century. The “road to Rome” was a long and often contentious one. While efforts to create a global criminal court can be traced back to the early 19th century, the story began in earnest in 1872 with Gustav Moynier – one of the founders of the International Committee of the Red Cross – who proposed a permanent court in response to the crimes of the Franco-Prussian War. The next serious call for an internationalized system of justice came from the drafters of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, who envisaged an ad hoc international court to try the Kaiser and German war criminals of World War I. Following World War II, the Allies set up the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals to try Axis war criminals.

The UN General Assembly Resolution n. 260 on 9 December 1948, provided for the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, and was the first step towards the establishment of an international permanent criminal tribunal with jurisdiction on crimes yet to be defined ininternational treaties. In the resolution there was a hope for an effort from the Legal UN commission in that direction. The General Assembly, after the considerations expressed from the commission, established a committee to draft a statute and study the related legal issues.

States parties of the Rome Statute of the Inte...

States parties of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Updated to July 2011 (116 members). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

States parties of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Updated to July 2011 (116 members). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1951 a first draft was presented; a second followed during the same year but there were a number of delays, officially due to the difficulties in the definition of the crime of aggression, that were only solved with diplomatic assemblies in the years following the statute’s coming into force. The geopolitical tensions of the Cold War also contributed to the delays.

In June 1989, motivated in part by an effort to combat drug trafficking, Trinidad and Tobago resurrected a pre-existing proposal for the establishment of an ICC and the UN GA asked that the ILC resume its work on drafting a statute. The conflicts in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia as well as in Rwanda in the early 1990,s and the mass commission of crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide led the UN Security Councilto establish two separate temporary ad- hoc tribunals to hold individuals accountable for these atrocities, further highlighting the need for a permanent international criminal court.

In 1994, the ILC presented its final draft statute for an ICC to the UN GA and recommended that a conference of plenipotentiaries be convened to negotiate a treaty and enact the Statute. To consider major substantive issues in the draft statute, the General Assembly established the Ad Hoc Committee on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court, which met twice in 1995.

After considering the Committee’s report, the UN GA created the Preparatory Committee on the Establishment of the ICC to prepare a consolidated draft text. From 1996 to 1998, six sessions of the UN Preparatory Committee were held at the United Nations headquarters in New York, in which NGOs provided input into the discussions and attended meetings under the umbrella of the NGO Coalition for an ICC (CICC). In January 1998, the Bureau and coordinators of the Preparatory Committee convened for an Inter-Sessional meeting in Zutphen, the Netherlands to technically consolidate and restructure the draft articles into a draft.

Statute of Rome AfricaEstablished by the Rome Statute of 1998, the ICC can try cases involving individuals charged with war crimes committed since July 2002. The Security Council, the ICC Prosecutor or a State Party to the court can initiate any proceedings, and the ICC only acts when countries themselves are unwilling or unable to investigate or prosecute.

Despite collective efforts, much remains to be done towards universal ratification of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC),United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said recently encouraging Member States to ratify or accede to it.

“I am convinced that the solution of broadening the reach of the Court is not disengagement, but universality,” Mr. Ban told the 12th session of the Assembly of States Parties of the ICC in a <”http://www.un.org/sg/statements/index.asp?nid=7295“>message delivered by Miguel de Serpa Soares, UN Legal Counsel and Under-Secretary-General.

Of the 139 States that signed the ICC’s founding treaty, 31 have yet to ratify it and 43 States have neither signed nor acceded to it.

“Only once the Rome Statute has been universally accepted can the Court be as effective as we would wish it to be, with a truly global reach,” he said in the message.

Beyond the lack of universality, the ICC also faces other challenges, including a struggle for necessary resources and staffing shortages.

The Court also has difficulties bringing the accused to judgement and delivering justice to the victims without undue delay,the UN chief noted in his message.

“It faces the fundamental challenge of upholding the core principles of justice, equality and the rule of law: that the law applies equally to all,” Mr. Ban’s said, adding that the law must also be delivered independently, impartially and in conformity with international human rights law and standards.

Just as importantly, the law must be seen as being so delivered, Mr. Ban highlighted.

He also noted the importance of building effective national justice institutions and dispute mechanisms.

“Our commitment to international criminal justice is not only a commitment to strengthened international cooperation and dialogue, but also to strengthened domestic human rights and rule of law systems,” he added.

“At this difficult moment, we must remain steadfast and ensure that we are on the right side of history,” the Secretary-General said, stressing that as uncomfortable as it might be, “we must address our challenges head on” by encouraging dialogue and remaining true to the principles of the statute.   “This Assembly is the best forum for this dialogue.”

New York, Nov 20 2013  5:00PM

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#bosnia-herzegovina, #international-committee-of-the-red-cross, #international-criminal-court, #kenya, #rome-statute-of-the-international-criminal-court, #security-council, #united-nations, #united-nations-general-assembly

ICC Announces Arrest of Four Men Linked to Trial of Former Dr Congo

English: International Criminal Court (ICC) logo

English: International Criminal Court (ICC) logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceWorldNews says four people have been arrested for alleged witness tampering in the war crimes trial of former Congolese vice president Jean-Pierre Bemba, the International Criminal Court (ICC) today announced.

The four men are accused of “corruptly influencing witnesses before the ICC and presenting evidence that they knew to be false or forged,” according to a <“http://www.icc-cpi.int/en_menus/icc/press%20and%20media/press%20releases/Pages/pr962.aspx“>news release  from The Hague-based Court.

It is alleged that the suspects were part of a network for the purposes of presenting false or forged documents and bribing certain persons to give false testimony in the case against Mr. Bemba, whose trial started in November 2010.

The four men, arrested today and yesterday following a warrant issued on 20 November by Judge Cuno Tarfusser, include Mr. Bemba’s Lead Counsel Aimé Kilolo Musamba taken into custody by Belgian authorities, and Jean-Jacques Mangenda Kabongo, a member of Mr Bemba’s defence team and case manager, who was arrested in the Netherlands.

English: DR Congo 2006 presidential election c...

English: DR Congo 2006 presidential election candidate Jean-Pierre Bemba (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The two other men are Fidèle Babala Wandu, a member of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Parliament and Deputy Secretary General of the Mouvement pour la Libération du Congo – who was taken into custody in the DRC – and Narcisse Arido, a Defence witness, who was arrested by French authorities.

“On behalf of the Court, the Registrar of the ICC, Herman von Hebel, expressed his gratitude to the States’ authorities for their cooperation,” the ICC said, adding that these are the first arrests made in relation to such charges before the Court.

Mr. Bemba is the alleged President and Commander-in-Chief of the Mouvement de libération du Congo being tried for two counts of crimes against humanity (rape and murder) and three counts of war crimes (rape, murder and pillaging) allegedly committed in the Central African Republic (CAR).

Established by the Rome Statute of 1998, the ICC can try cases involving individuals charged with war crimes committed since July 2002. The Security Council, the ICC Prosecutor or a State Party to the court can initiate any proceedings, and the ICC only acts when countries themselves are unwilling or unable to investigate or prosecute.

New York, Nov 24 2013  6:00PM

 

#aceworldnews, #arrest, #bemba, #central-african-republic, #congo, #cuno-tarfusser, #democratic-republic-of-congo, #international-criminal-court, #jean-pierre-bemba, #movement-for-the-liberation-of-the-congo

Press release – Human Rights and Democracy Report 2012 – 2013 – #Syria

Coat of arms of Syria -- the "Hawk of Qur...

Coat of arms of Syria — the “Hawk of Qureish” with shield of vertical tricolor of the national flag, holding a scroll with the words الجمهورية العربية السورية (Al-Jumhuriyah al-`Arabiyah as-Suriyah “The Syrian Arab Republic”). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Latest update: 30 September 2013

The human rights situation in Syria has continued to deteriorate in the period between July and September 2013. The conflict has reached devastating proportions: more than 100,000 Syrians have been killed, 6.8 million are in need inside Syria and over 5.8 million Syrians have been forced to flee their homes, with over 2 million people fleeing to neighbouring countries. Nearly a third of the Syrian population is in urgent need of humanitarian assistance.

In light of the deteriorating humanitarian situation, the UK announced a further £100 million of humanitarian assistance on 25 September to help get essentials such as food, water and medicine to Syrian people in dire need. This brings the UK’s total to half a billion pounds, the UK’s largest response to a single humanitarian crisis. This reflects the scale, despair and brutality of the situation.

We remain in full support of the UN Commission of Inquiry, who continue to gather evidence of human rights violations and abuses with the aim of bringing those responsible to account. Their latest report, published on 11 September, highlighted how civilians are continuing to suffer from the ongoing fighting. The report described crimes against humanity and war crimes being committed by the regime and its forces, and serious violations committed by extremist anti-regime armed groups. The report concluded that there is no military solution to the conflict, and that a political solution founded upon the tenets of the Geneva communiqué is the only path to peace.

Against this background, the UK welcomed the adoption by the UN Human Rights Council of a new resolution on 27 September, which condemned the use of chemical weapons, called for the perpetrators of human rights violations and abuses to be held to account and demanded full access for the UN Commission of Inquiry and humanitarian workers. The resolution also condemned the use of chemical weapons and contained language on preventing sexual violence.

On the same day, the UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution on Syrian chemical weapons, ending a 17-month stalemate in the Security Council on Syria. The UK strongly supported this resolution, which is a welcome step towards our broad objective of achieving a political solution to end the crisis. We continue to work towards a second Geneva conference to bring all sides together. We are appalled by the chemical weapons attack in Damascus on 21 August, which led to the death of hundreds of civilians and wounded many more. All evidence points towards government responsibility for the attacks. The Prime Minister and Foreign Secretary have consistently made clear that those responsible for the most serious international crimes in Syria should be held to account, and we believe the situation in Syria should be referred to the International Criminal Court.

Since April 2012, we have committed over £40.5 million in non-humanitarian assistance to address the Syria crisis. This includes support to the moderate opposition, local councils, human rights defenders and civil society. We have provided equipment to help protect these groups and enable them to provide security and services to the Syrian people; this equipment includes armoured vehicles, body armour, generators, communications equipment and training for human rights activists.

Latest update: 30 June 2013

Syria

Syria (Photo credit: ewixx)

In the period between April and June 2013, the human rights situation in Syria continued to deteriorate. Over 93,000 Syrians have died, more than 1.6 million are refugees and 4.25 million have been displaced within Syria due to the conflict.

We remain in full support of the work of the UN Commission of Inquiry, who continue to gather evidence of human rights violations and abuses with the aim of bringing all those responsible to account. Their latest report, published on 4 June highlighted the new levels of brutality evident in the conflict; including documented cases of the use of chemical agents, the systematic imposition of sieges, forcible displacement and sexual and gender based violence and abuse. The report notes that whilst anti-government armed groups have also committed war crimes, their violations and abuses did not reach the intensity and scale of those committed by government forces and affiliated militia.

The UK welcomed the UN Human Rights Council’s adoption of a new resolution on 14 June, which strongly condemned the intervention of all foreign combatants, including those fighting on behalf of the Syrian regime. It urged all parties to refrain from any actions which may contribute to an increase in the number of violations of human rights and international law. The resolution stressed the need to follow-up on the Commission of Inquiry’s report and conduct a transparent and independent investigation into all violations of international law by all parties.

We also welcomed the UN Human Rights Council’s previous resolution adopted on 28 May, centred upon the Syrian government’s siege of Al-Qusayr. The resolution strongly condemned the violations of international law by Syrian authorities and government-affiliated militias, in particular the regime’s use of ballistic missiles and other heavy weapons against the people of Al-Qusayr. The resolution demanded that the Syrian authorities allow free and unimpeded access by the UN and humanitarian agencies, and requested that the Commission of Inquiry urgently conducts a comprehensive inquiry into the events in Al-Qusayr. In a statement on 4 June, the Foreign Secretary, William Hague, reiterated the request, calling on Assad’s forces to allow immediate humanitarian access to Al-Qusayr.

The UK remains committed to achieving a political solution to the crisis based on a vision for a united, inclusive and democratic Syria. As the Geneva Communiqué states, the public services must be preserved or restored. This includes the military forces and security services. However all governmental institutions and state offices must perform according to professional and human rights standards. We also condemn in the strongest possible terms all human rights violations and abuses in Syria, committed by anyone, including indiscriminate attacks on civilians. We call on all sides to respect international humanitarian and human rights laws, noting the particular responsibility of the Syrian authorities in this regard.

There are now 1.6 million refugees registered/in process in neighbouring countries, and nearly a third of the Syrian population is in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. The UK is doing all it can to help all those affected by the violence and is playing a leading role as a bilateral donor to the international humanitarian response. We have already contributed £173 million in humanitarian aid so far. This has provided food for over 132,000 people across Syria, clean drinking water for almost 1 million people and almost 300,000 medical consultations. As announced at the G8, the UK is now set to double its contribution, bringing our total support to £348 million, with over £100 million going to the UN appeals. The funding includes our ongoing humanitarian aid, as well as development assistance to Jordan and Lebanon, both of whom have seen a dramatic increase in the number of Syrian refugees in recent months.

The UK has also continued to provide support via non-lethal assistance, geared towards strengthening the moderate opposition, supporting civil society and helping to reduce the effects of regional spill over. This assistance includes training for human rights activists, communications equipment, body armour and water purification kits. This has brought the total of our non-lethal assistance to £30million.

Further Information

Read and comment on the country of concern – Syria

Read and comment on the Human Rights and Democracy Report 2012 in full

 

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NON-ALIGNED MOVEMENT NATIONS SPOTLIGHT IMPORTANCE OF INTERNATIONAL RULE OF LAW

Addressing the NAM Ministerial Meeting on Cooperation for the Rule of Law at the International Level, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said the meeting was an opportunity to ensure that States uphold the rule of law not just domestically but internationally.

“International humanitarian law safeguards the protection of innocent civilians in all conflicts. It is a cornerstone of our common humanity,” Mr. Ban said.
Ban“We must hold accountable all those responsible for serious breaches of international humanitarian and human rights law. The Rome Statute establishing the International Criminal Court has been widely ratified to ensure this accountability.”

Mr. Ban added that upholding the rule of law at the international level is the collective responsibility of Member States, and added that it should be a priority particularly now when various conflicts are unfolding across the world.
For more details go to UN News Centre at http://www.un.org/news

#acenewsservices, #ban-ki-moon, #international-criminal-court, #rome, #the-rome-statute