NEW YORK: ‘ MASTERMIND BEHIND BOMBING OF US EMBASSIES DIES DAYS BEFORE TRIAL ‘

#AceWorldNews – NEW YORK:Jan.03: A Libyan man accused of masterminding the 1998 al-Qaida bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania has died just days before he was due to stand trial in New York for the crimes The Guardian reported.

'Abu Anas al-Liby ' Most Wanted Dies '

‘Abu Anas al-Liby ‘ Most Wanted Dies ‘

Abu Anas al-Liby, 50, died on Friday from complications following liver surgery, his wife said.

He had a $5m (£3.3m) bounty on his head and was high on the FBI’s most-wanted list when he was captured by US forces in Tripoli in October 2013.

He and a Saudi businessman Khalid al-Fawwaz were due to stand trial on 12 January over the attacks, in which 244 people were killed and more than 5,000 wounded.

AP reporting said that fifteen years after allegedly helping al-Qaida plot the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, Abu Anas al-Libi parked his car on a quiet street in Libya’s capital.

Within moments, soldiers from the U.S. Army’s elite Delta Force forced him at gunpoint into a van and sped away.

They’d fly him to a naval ship in the Mediterranean Sea before finally bringing him to New York to stand trial on charges of helping kill 224 people, including a dozen Americans, and wound more than 4,500.

#ANS2015

#al-qaeda, #bombings, #kenya, #libyan, #tanzania

‘ Two Iranians Arrested Plead Guilty to Stolen Israeli Passports ‘

#AceWorldNews- KENYA – September 24 – The two Iranians arrested in Kenya last week, pleaded guilty on the charge of possession of forged documents Jewish press reported today. 

The two were travelling on stolen Israeli passports, and had changed the photos to their own.

They pair claimed they were seeking asylum and asked to not be returned to Iran, where they said they might be killed.

#ANS2014

#forged, #iranian, #kenya, #passports

‘ Egyptian Adel Abdul Bary Pleading Guilty to Charges Connected to 1998 Bombings of Embassies ‘

#AceNewsServices – September 19 – An Egyptian man, Adel Abdul Bary, said on Friday he would plead guilty in New York to charges connected with the 1998 bombings of US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania, Reuters reported.

' Adel Abdul Bary on Trial '

‘ Adel Abdul Bary on Trial ‘

Bary, 54, said in court he would plead guilty to making a threat to use an explosive device and conspiracy to murder Americans.

The plea comes two months before he was set to face trial in a federal court alongside two co-defendants, Libyan Anas al-Liby and Saudi Khalid al-Fawwaz.

The bombings killed 224 people. Bary and Fawwaz helped disseminate statements of responsibility for the group, according to an earlier criminal indictment.

#ANS2014

#adel-abdul-bary, #americans, #anas-al-liby, #egyptian, #kenya, #khalid-al-fawwaz, #libyan, #new-york, #saudi, #tanzania, #us

‘ Somalia’s al-Shabaab Claim Responsibility for Attack on Bus Killing Seven ‘

#AceWorldNews – MOGADISHU – July 19 – Somalia‘s al Shabaab insurgents claimed responsibility on Saturday for an attack on a bus on Kenya‘s northern coast that killed seven.

Gunmen blocked the bus with their car late on Friday and sprayed it with bullets.

They also attacked two lorries carrying mangos near Witu, a town in Lamu County which borders Somalia.

“The attack was in response to Kenya’s claim that it deployed more troops in the coast and thus tightened security,” Sheikh Abdiasis Abu Musab, spokesman for al Shabaab’s military operations told Reuters.

#ANS2014 

 

#al-shabaab, #friday, #kenya, #lamu, #nairobi, #reuters, #somalia, #witu

` NSA Records Almost All Domestic and International Phone Calls in Afghanistan ‘

#AceSecurityNews – NSA – May 23 – The NSA records almost all domestic and international phone calls in Afghanistan, similar to what it does in the Bahamas, WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange said.

Reports in the Washington Post and the Intercept had previously reported that domestic and international phone calls from two or more target states had been recorded and stored in mass as of 2013.

Both publications censored the name of one victim country at the request of the US government, which the Intercept referred to as ‘Country X’.

Assange says he cannot disclose how WikiLeaks confirmed the identity of the victim state for the sake of source protection, though the claim can be “independently verified” via means of “forensic scrutiny of imperfectly applied censorship on related documents released to date and correlations with other NSA programs.”


This is not the first time it has been revealed mass surveillance was being conducted on Afghanistan by the NSA. According to a book released by Der Spiegel entitled ‘Der NSA Komplex’, a program called ACIDWASH collects 30-40 million telephony metadata records per day from Afghanistan. ACIDWASH has been identified as being part of the MYSTIC program.

WikiLeaks cannot be complicit in the censorship of victim state X. The country in question is #Afghanistan. https://t.co/vWwU4DJw0I#afpak
— WikiLeaks (@wikileaks) May 23, 2014
The Intercept, which Glenn Greenwald, who first broke the Edward Snowden revelations helped to found, had earlier named the Bahamas as having their mobile calls recorded and stored by a powerful National Security Agency (NSA) program called SOMALGET.

SOMALGET is part of a broader NSA program called MYSTIC, which the the NSA is using to gather metadata – including the numbers dialled and the time and duration of the calls – from phone calls in the Bahamas, Mexico, Kenya and the Philippines. SOMALGET by its nature is far more controversial, however, as it stores actual phone conversations for up to 30 days.

WikiLeaks initially opted not to reveal the name of ‘Country X’ as they were led to believe it could “lead to deaths” by Greenwald. WikiLeaks later accused The Intercept and its parent company First Look Media of censorship, saying they would go ahead and publish the name of the NSA-targeted country.

“We do not believe it is the place of media to ‘aid and abet’ a state in escaping detection and prosecution for a serious crime against a population,” Assange said in the statement.

Read More at: RT – 23/05/2104 – http://tinyurl.com/paehpu9

#ANS2014

#bahamas, #kenya, #mexico, #nsa, #philippines, #wikileaks

` Hundreds of Somalis Are Expelled from Kenya Following Crack-Down on Al-Qaeda-linked Shabab ‘

#AceWorldNews – SOMALIA – May 23 – Hundreds of Somalis have been expelled from Kenya, with 98 in the latest batch sent back in a major crackdown on suspected Islamists, AFP said, citing a report of the Human Rights Watch (HRW).

The crackdown has seen people held in police cells or a football stadium, the group said Friday.

This follows a spate of attacks in Kenya by suspected supporters of Somalia’s Al-Qaeda-linked Shabab rebels.

A batch sent to Somalia by air-plane on Tuesday was reportedly the fourth round sent home, taking the total expelled to 359.

#ANS2014

#al-qaeda, #al-shabab, #kenya, #somalia

` Kenyan Police Detaining Somali’s Law Abiding Citizen’s under Terrorist Crackdown could lead to Xenophobia ‘

AceWorldNews – NAIROBI – Kenya – Somalia’s prime minister expressed concern Monday over the detention of what he says are law-abiding Somalis in Kenya, where police are conducting a security crackdown aimed at stopping terrorist attacks.

Kenyan police have arrested thousands of people, most of them ethnic Somalis, following a wave of violent attacks blamed on the Somali militant group al-Shabab.

Last week a car bomb exploded outside a Nairobi police station, killing two policemen and two occupants of the vehicle, both ethnic Somalis.

The security operation has been strongly criticized by rights groups who say authorities are profiling Somalis, detaining them without trial, extorting refugees, holding the suspects in inhumane conditions and circumventing the law to deport some back to Somalia.

Rights activists have warned the targeting of Somalis could lead to xenophobia and increase radicalisation of Muslim youths, who may feel their religion is under attack.

Ace Related News:
1. Fox News – April 28 – http://tinyurl.com/p64mmkv

#ANS2014

#aceworldnews, #kenya, #muslim, #nairobi, #somalia

` Attack on Church in `Mombasa ‘ kills 4 and Wounded others as Gunmen shot at Worshippers ‘

#AceWorldNews – KENYA – 24 March – Four people were killed and others wounded in an attack on a church in the Kenyan coastal city of Mombasa, Reuters reported.

The attack occurred when two gunmen began shooting at worshippers.

“Both carried big guns and began shooting all over the place. I fell to the ground and could hear screams,” said witness Lilian Omondi.

Another witness described one of the gunmen shouting in a different language before starting to shoot.

#ANS2014

#kenya, #kenyan, #mombasa, #reuters, #rt-news

#AceWorldNews says Somali pirates have hijacked a merchant…

#AceWorldNews says Somali pirates have hijacked a merchant vessel in the Red Sea in the first successful capture of a ship in the region since 2012, Reuters reports. The MV Marzooqah sent out a distress signal on Saturday evening, said Andrew Mwangura, secretary general of the Seafarers Union of Kenya. The number of pirate attacks in the area reduced drastically in 2013 due to the increased navy presence in the region.

#kenya, #navy, #red-sea, #reuters, #seafarers-union-of-kenya, #somali

Universal Ratification of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

#AceWorldNews says the history of the establishment of the International Criminal Court (ICC) spans over more than a century. The “road to Rome” was a long and often contentious one. While efforts to create a global criminal court can be traced back to the early 19th century, the story began in earnest in 1872 with Gustav Moynier – one of the founders of the International Committee of the Red Cross – who proposed a permanent court in response to the crimes of the Franco-Prussian War. The next serious call for an internationalized system of justice came from the drafters of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, who envisaged an ad hoc international court to try the Kaiser and German war criminals of World War I. Following World War II, the Allies set up the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals to try Axis war criminals.

The UN General Assembly Resolution n. 260 on 9 December 1948, provided for the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, and was the first step towards the establishment of an international permanent criminal tribunal with jurisdiction on crimes yet to be defined ininternational treaties. In the resolution there was a hope for an effort from the Legal UN commission in that direction. The General Assembly, after the considerations expressed from the commission, established a committee to draft a statute and study the related legal issues.

States parties of the Rome Statute of the Inte...

States parties of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Updated to July 2011 (116 members). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

States parties of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. Updated to July 2011 (116 members). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1951 a first draft was presented; a second followed during the same year but there were a number of delays, officially due to the difficulties in the definition of the crime of aggression, that were only solved with diplomatic assemblies in the years following the statute’s coming into force. The geopolitical tensions of the Cold War also contributed to the delays.

In June 1989, motivated in part by an effort to combat drug trafficking, Trinidad and Tobago resurrected a pre-existing proposal for the establishment of an ICC and the UN GA asked that the ILC resume its work on drafting a statute. The conflicts in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia as well as in Rwanda in the early 1990,s and the mass commission of crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide led the UN Security Councilto establish two separate temporary ad- hoc tribunals to hold individuals accountable for these atrocities, further highlighting the need for a permanent international criminal court.

In 1994, the ILC presented its final draft statute for an ICC to the UN GA and recommended that a conference of plenipotentiaries be convened to negotiate a treaty and enact the Statute. To consider major substantive issues in the draft statute, the General Assembly established the Ad Hoc Committee on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court, which met twice in 1995.

After considering the Committee’s report, the UN GA created the Preparatory Committee on the Establishment of the ICC to prepare a consolidated draft text. From 1996 to 1998, six sessions of the UN Preparatory Committee were held at the United Nations headquarters in New York, in which NGOs provided input into the discussions and attended meetings under the umbrella of the NGO Coalition for an ICC (CICC). In January 1998, the Bureau and coordinators of the Preparatory Committee convened for an Inter-Sessional meeting in Zutphen, the Netherlands to technically consolidate and restructure the draft articles into a draft.

Statute of Rome AfricaEstablished by the Rome Statute of 1998, the ICC can try cases involving individuals charged with war crimes committed since July 2002. The Security Council, the ICC Prosecutor or a State Party to the court can initiate any proceedings, and the ICC only acts when countries themselves are unwilling or unable to investigate or prosecute.

Despite collective efforts, much remains to be done towards universal ratification of the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC),United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said recently encouraging Member States to ratify or accede to it.

“I am convinced that the solution of broadening the reach of the Court is not disengagement, but universality,” Mr. Ban told the 12th session of the Assembly of States Parties of the ICC in a <”http://www.un.org/sg/statements/index.asp?nid=7295“>message delivered by Miguel de Serpa Soares, UN Legal Counsel and Under-Secretary-General.

Of the 139 States that signed the ICC’s founding treaty, 31 have yet to ratify it and 43 States have neither signed nor acceded to it.

“Only once the Rome Statute has been universally accepted can the Court be as effective as we would wish it to be, with a truly global reach,” he said in the message.

Beyond the lack of universality, the ICC also faces other challenges, including a struggle for necessary resources and staffing shortages.

The Court also has difficulties bringing the accused to judgement and delivering justice to the victims without undue delay,the UN chief noted in his message.

“It faces the fundamental challenge of upholding the core principles of justice, equality and the rule of law: that the law applies equally to all,” Mr. Ban’s said, adding that the law must also be delivered independently, impartially and in conformity with international human rights law and standards.

Just as importantly, the law must be seen as being so delivered, Mr. Ban highlighted.

He also noted the importance of building effective national justice institutions and dispute mechanisms.

“Our commitment to international criminal justice is not only a commitment to strengthened international cooperation and dialogue, but also to strengthened domestic human rights and rule of law systems,” he added.

“At this difficult moment, we must remain steadfast and ensure that we are on the right side of history,” the Secretary-General said, stressing that as uncomfortable as it might be, “we must address our challenges head on” by encouraging dialogue and remaining true to the principles of the statute.   “This Assembly is the best forum for this dialogue.”

New York, Nov 20 2013  5:00PM

Related articles

#bosnia-herzegovina, #international-committee-of-the-red-cross, #international-criminal-court, #kenya, #rome-statute-of-the-international-criminal-court, #security-council, #united-nations, #united-nations-general-assembly