‘ David Cameron Military Action at Invitation of Iraq ‘

#AceNewsServices – BRITAIN – September 23 – David Cameron supports the latest air strikes by the US and five other countries from the Gulf and Middle East, Downing Street has said.

The UK prime minister, in New York for a UN General Assembly meeting, will be holding talks about “what more the UK can do to contribute”, No 10 added.

The UK is already providing arms to the Kurds as well as surveillance support.

The BBC’s Nick Robinson said Parliament could be recalled by Friday if Labour and Lib Dems back UK military action.

The involvement of UK forces could be restricted to Iraq, where they would be operating at the invitation of the government in Baghdad.

Nick Robinson said Mr Cameron would only put the issue to a House of Commons vote, if he was confident of support from Labour, the Lib Dems and his own backbenchers.

“David Cameron will not risk a repeat of the Commons defeat he faced last summer over air strikes in response to President Assad’s use of chemical weapons.”

Fair wind’ for action:

Former Labour foreign secretary Jack Straw said under the right circumstances there could be support for Britain joining air strikes in Iraq.

He said the situation was different from when the Commons voted against intervention in Syria last year.

“If Mr Cameron comes to Labour and there’s a clear proposition I think he’ll get a fair wind,” he said.

Several Conservative MPs who opposed air strikes in Syria last summer have told the BBC they would now support military action.

Crispin Blunt, a former minister and one of the Tory rebels at the time, said there was “no great controversy” about the UK’s military involvement – short of a significant ground commitment – and there was no need to recall Parliament.

“Any military strategy against ISIS, which is necessary, must involve taking them on in Iraq and Syria,” he said.

Another of last year’s Tory rebels, Sarah Wollaston, said if Syrian strikes were the only way to hit IS effectively she would support them.

She has explained her position in an open letter to constituents on her website.

Conservative Julian Lewis said he “would be in favour” of military action if there was “a coherent and sensible plan”.

Another backbencher who rebelled last year, Charles Walker, said he would support action against IS with or without the recall of Parliament.

Other Conservatives have privately confirmed they would support strikes.

#ANS2014

#britain, #conservatives, #iraq, #labour, #liberal-democrats, #syria, #united-nations, #united-states, #us

#UK:` Financial Crisis for the Poor’ Meanwhile the `Wealthy Gain Rich Pickings’ from this Government’s Strategy’

#AceGuestNews says Financial crisis for many, bonanza for the few.  

Beginning his working life in the aviation industry and trained by the BBC, Tony Gosling is a British land rights activist, historian & investigative radio journalist.
Published time: February 03, 2014 13:42
Reuters/Kacper PempelReuters/Kacper Pempel
Despite what the UK’s ruling politicians or statisticians from palm-greased think tanks may say, the UK’s economic “recovery” is visible nowhere on the country’s streets.

The opiate of Quantitative Easing (QE) or Printing Money, the £375 billion fraudulently spirited up so far, is making some of the figures look good, but it is killing the patient.

The effect of QE is to propel the nest eggs of the rich from prudent “savings accounts,” where interest rates are at an all-time low, into capricious stock and bond markets to be managed by hedge funds and other pushy players. Meanwhile, everything with half a brain that moves, including the Parliamentary Commission on Banking, chaired by Conservative MP Andrew Tyrie, is demanding to see clear blue water between public-facing banks and the casino economy. However, precisely the opposite is happening, as billions of savings leaves the safe ground in search of higher returns.

The London media have no excuse to talk of a “recovery.” They don’t have to look very far to see the tell-tale signs of a nation falling apart: Try looking down next time you’re in the street. None of the infrastructure of the nation is being maintained. From jutting-out high street paving slabs to potholed roads and even silted up rivers in the Somerset Levels that have been flooded since Christmas, the vital systems of the nation are clogged and breaking.

For a country with one of the highest living standards in the world to have 20 percent of its population, ticking up every month, existing below the poverty line, something must be very wrong. And the “democratic” strings that are supposed to tie Britain’s 65 million people to the cosseted elite that spend the nation’s taxes are also horribly frayed. The period before a general election is when a government courts its voters.

And what is the role of Britain’s third-party in all this? The Liberal Democrats (with 56 MPs) hold the balance of power between Labour (256) and the Conservatives (303). Any party in such a position should call the shots, as Irish MPs did with the 1885 Ashbourne Act which forced absentee English landowners to hand over land to Irish farmers who had been impoverished by the famine: A dramatic change in ownership that was one of the main catalysts for Irish Home Rule.

A broken labour market

Like the “Balance of Payments,” which compares British exports to imports, taking stock of the “Cost of Living” has fallen out of fashion in the London media. Maybe it’s the lack of the feel-good factor in both sets of statistics – but that doesn’t make either of them any less crucial to understanding whether or not the economy is working. Cost of living is rarely mentioned because an enormous, economically driven, social engineering by the power elite has been played out in our lives in a generation. Britain has fallen from a high-wage, unionized, high-job security economy, from a developed world to a third-world economy in those 30 years.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFPSpencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP

A broken housing market

Former Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith (IDS) has a “great plan” to exterminate Britain’s welfare benefits. So as Work and Pensions Secretary he has put the onus on the claimant, however disabled, mentally ill or otherwise infirm, to prove they are in need, and many are struggling to do so. Scores have already taken their own lives because the vulnerable cannot endure his“survival of the fittest” ATOS test. Duncan-Smith’s own family, though, continue to receive around £1.2 million in annual welfare benefits – in the form of agricultural subsidies for their inherited land.

IDS’s other “flagship” policy is the Bedroom Tax. So vicious is this tax that it puts the most vulnerable in constant fear of eviction and, unbelievably, costs the government more! Both to pay the higher rents the private sector demands and in eviction fees. Meanwhile, Britain is encouraging mass economic migration and building fewer homes than any time since the 1920s, so as to keep property prices artificially high. Now Britons who don’t get Housing Benefit are, on average, paying a staggering 45 percent of their income on rent or mortgage costs.

A broken food market

The international grain trade, according to Oxfam, is now dominated by only five multinational companies. ADM, Bunge, Cargill, Glencore and Louis Dreyfus control 90 percent of this fundamental trade. Through the unregulated derivative markets’ ability to speculate on a future collapse in world food supplies, a hideous profit motive is being whispered of which enriches the few by pushing billions of people to the edge of starvation.

With the demise of the biggest traditional fish, meat and fruit and vegetable markets, deals are now cut behind closed doors for vast quantities of food, the economies of scale suiting buyer and seller alike. With only seven supermarket chains in the UK (Aldi, Asda, Lidl, Morrison’s, Sainsbury’s, Tesco and Waitrose) selling 85 percent of the country’s food they are able to coax almost every consumer with other basic essentials on the same site: petrol, banking and pharmacies, for example, driving traditional, locally owned shops to the wall.

As historian E.P. Thompson wrote in his 1979 book, “Writing by Candlelight,”quoting from an Elizabethan diary he found behind an oak panel in his library:

Fruit cannot go to Markett, not for Money nor even yett as Charitye for the Poor. Some say it be through a Sort of Monopolisers in the Dealing Trade, wch wd keep all Price at its Customary Heighth as it is set in any Leen Yeer. And that these Dealers wd rather that the Poor Starve, the Fruits fall Rotted and Wormey, and the Husbandmen & their Familys Toile & Swinke for no Reward – all so that their Proffits be not Sunke.

Prices paid to farmers today, they say, are driven down by the supermarkets while what the consumer pays is ratcheted up. The small grocers go to the wall and the poor cannot afford to eat, while the multinational food cartels become more powerful every day. With an exponential threefold rise in food bank use this Christmas, and food bank users set to top the 1 million mark in 2014, it seems that monopolies – after 400 years, the crooked markets of Elizabethan times – are back.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP

Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP

A broken energy market

One of the most damning indictments of Coalition Britain is the obscene way in which the destitute have been quietly and gradually made to pay the energy bills of the rich. An investment now in an energy company of £20,000, peanuts for the rich, delivers annual share dividends which will pay the annual gas and electricity bill of the average two or three-bedroom home. That investment grows above inflation too and will provide a tidy sum if the investor ever tires of his free energy. Through the privatization of the utilities, indentured servitude has been hardwired into the economy and the suffering.

At the other end of the spectrum, those living hand to mouth are forced off cheap direct debit payment schemes onto key meter energy tariffs, where they can pay as much as double what the rich are paying, or not paying, for each unit of energy they use. Such injustice and cruelty is scarcely conscionable in a nation proud to suit among the top ten wealthiest in the world. One can only speculate that this must be worked out on average wealth, a handful of billionaires surrounded by hoards of 16th Century destitute.

Perhaps these markets are not ‘broken’ at all?

Given that Britain’s plutocrats are doing very nicely, thank you, out of the £850 billion bank rescue in 2008 and the subsequent financial “crisis,” and that their friends in the London media have promised not to tread on their toes, let’s take an educated guess at what the real game might be here.

Perhaps there is no democracy? Perhaps all the political parties are bought and paid for lock, stock and barrel by the power elite who have no conscience, letting accountants run their affairs.

And when they have filled all their garages with the most ostentatious sports cars money can buy, the next thing up the pecking order perhaps is a government department or a newspaper or two?

“Nobody wants a crash,” some might say. But they’d be wrong. One of the unintended, or intended, consequences of deregulation in financial markets is that it’s now easier than ever to make a fortune from betting on disaster. What Naomi Klein calls “Disaster Capitalism” – economic warfare and deliberate sabotage of a nation’s economy – is more profitable than ever before.

The ordinary people of the world had better wise up and look sharp, because we are swimming in shark-infested waters. What the power elite don’t seem to have realized, though, is that we are teaching our children to watch those overnight subjects like hawks. The younger generation are good swimmers, and getting ready with their rocket harpoons.

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and full editorial rights to print have been obtained.

Though they do not necessarily represent those of: Ace New Group

 

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#aceguestnews, #aceguestpost, #aceguestviews, #andrew-tyrie, #britain, #conservative, #iain-duncan-smith, #labour, #liberal-democrats, #london, #quantitative-easing, #sainsbury, #secretary-of-state-for-work-and-pensions

#UKGOVNEWS : ” Tories Hand Out Plum Contracts to `Private Firms’ in NHS”

#AceNewsServices says `Tories want to Privatise NHS’ as cuts fund profits for `Fat-Cats’ while `Front Line Staff’ struggle to cope.

Health not WealthIn an article today by the `Daily Mirror’  Shadow Health Secretary Andy Burnham says huge payments to private agencies to cover understaffed wards is symptomatic of the Conservatives‘ long-term aims.

Before the 2010 election, the Tories promised “no top-down reorganisation of the NHS”. They were lying. They were secretly planning the biggest ever.

The shake-up, signed off by the Lib Dems, has cost £3billion and rising.

To pay for it, the PM took cash off the NHS front line he promised not to cut.

The result? Six-figure payoffs for hundreds of managers and P45s for thousands of nurses. It stinks.

Cameron’s reorganisation has left the NHS weakened, confused and short of staff.

And now the vultures are circling. Agencies are profiteering off the problems of the NHS by charging it exorbitant fees to fill a single shift.

And it only gets worse. Government cuts to NHS community services, mental health and social care are pushing more people to A&E, who in turn need more staff to cope. So our hospitals are trapped in a vicious circle as agencies keep raking in the cash.

Cameron’s reorganisation is giving private firms the green light to cherry-pick services.

 

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#acenewsservices, #andy-burnham, #conservative, #conservatives, #health-and-social-care, #liberal-democrats, #national-health-service, #nhs, #shadow-secretary-of-state-for-health, #tories, #tory

Nick Clegg Delivers Statement: “Dedicated to Nelson Mandela”

#AceNewsServices UK says Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg delivered a statement to the House of Commons in a special session dedicated to Nelson Mandela.

On behalf of the Liberal Democrats, I want to add our voice to the many tributes to Nelson Mandela, the father of modern South Africa. Our thoughts and condolences are with his loved ones, the people of South Africa and everyone around the world grieving his loss.

Nelson Mandela’s message transcended the boundaries of nations, people, colours and creeds. And his character transcended boundaries too: he was a politician, but appeared to be free of all the pettiness of politics.

He was a warm human being with a mischievous wit, and yet seemed to rise above the normal human frailties of anger and hurt.

He was a man who was well aware of his place in history, but he did not want to be placed on a pedestal and was humble.

So, with qualities like this, it is little wonder that millions of people who did not meet him in person nonetheless feel they have lost a hero and a friend.

I never had the privilege of meeting Nelson Mandela myself, but like so many people I almost feel as if I had. He clearly made a huge impact on all of those he did meet. I remember Paddy Ashdown once telling me, with a sigh, that his wife Jane would regularly say that Mandela was the funniest and most charming man she had ever met.

Free Nelson Mandela

Free Nelson Mandela (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As a student, I was one of the thousands of people who flooded into Wembley Stadium for the Free Nelson Mandela concert to mark his 70th birthday.

Stood there, I remember thinking how on earth could this one man live up to everyone’s expectations, if he was finally released?

But, as a free man, Nelson Mandela not only met those expectations, he surpassed them.

The challenge for South Africa seemed almost impossible at the time: how could people, who had spent so long divided in conflict, and either perpetrated or suffered so much abuse, find it within themselves to forgive, to move on and build something together.

Well, Mandela could, and did, and the truly remarkable example of forgiveness he set made it possible for his country to be reborn as the rainbow nation.

Given the enormity of his achievements, we are all struggling to work out the best way to honour his legacy.

I like to think that one of the things he would like us to do in this House today is to pay tribute to and support the individuals and organisations around the world that fight for human rights and do not have a global name.

Right now, all over the world, there are millions of men, women and children still struggling to overcome poverty, violence and discrimination.

They do not have the fame or the standing of Nelson Mandela, but I’m sure that he would tell us that what they achieve and endure in their pursuit of a more open, equal and just society shapes all our lives.

Campaigners like Mary Akrami, who works to protect and empower the women of Afghanistan; Sima Samar, the Head of the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission; or organisations like the Committee of Relatives of the Detained and Disappeared in Honduras which works in the shadow of threats and intimidation.

They are just 3 examples of the individuals and organisations who deserve our loyalty and support just as much as the British campaigners in the Anti-Apartheid movement in London showed unfailing loyalty and support towards Nelson Mandela in his bleakest days, and here I also want to pay tribute to the Rt. Hon Member for Neath and his fellow campaigners for what they did when.

All of this will make the way we mark tomorrow’s international Human Rights Day all the more significant.

And Britain can pay no greater tribute to Nelson Mandela than by standing up, around the world, for the values of human rights and equality he fought for.

When Nelson Mandela took his first steps to freedom, he made no call for vengeance, only forgiveness.

He understood that dismantling apartheid’s legacy was about more than just removing the most explicit signs of discrimination and segregation. And he recognised too that, to build a brighter future, South Africa must confront the darkness of its past.

In doing so, Nelson Mandela laid down a blueprint that has made it possible for other divided communities, such as in Northern Ireland, to reject violence, overcome their differences and make a fresh beginning.

And that is why I hope that in communities where people are still struggling to replace violence and conflict with peace and stability, the principles of forgiveness and reconciliation, which Mandela embodied, are followed by others too.

Recently, for example, we have debated in this House the alleged human rights abuses in Sri Lanka.

Surely, there can be no better way for that country to heal its wounds and bring peace and unity to all its people than to follow Mandela’s example and emulate South Africa’s truth and reconciliation process?

This, as I see it, is Nelson Mandela’s lasting legacy to all of us: to champion the defenders of human rights today and to know that wherever there is conflict and injustice, with hope and courage, peace is always possible.

As the Prime Minister reminded us earlier, at his 1964 trial, Mandela told the world that equality in South Africa was an ideal for which he was prepared to die.

No one who has listened to those words can fail to be moved to hear a man, so explicitly and so courageously, put his life on the line for freedom.

As others have remarked, Mandela famously liked to repeat the great saying, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

So, on this year’s Human Rights Day and beyond, let us honour his memory by ensuring that the hope he gave lives on for all those whose liberties and rights are still denied.

UKGOV

 

#acenewsservices, #afghan-independent-human-rights-commission, #free-nelson-mandela, #human-rights-day, #liberal-democrats, #mandela, #nelson-mandela, #nick-clegg, #paddy-ashdown, #sima-samar, #south-africa

Sunday Trading Not For Families

Sunday Morning

Sunday Morning (Photo credit: jspaw)

The Sunday Telegraph reports that some leading Conservatives have called for an extension to retail opening hours on Sundays. Trading restrictions on bigger stores have been dropped for six weeks this summer to coincide with the Olympics. The ministers are said to be keen to use this as a springboard for longer hours to be allowed permanently. However, Liberal Democrats oppose such a move, which would also likely be fought by unions, small businesses and the Church.

For many a year and way back to The Sunday Trading Act 1994 has been an Act of Parliament in the United Kingdom governing the right of shops in England and Wales to trade on a Sunday. Buying and selling on Sunday had previously been illegal, with exceptions, under the Shops Act 1950.

On many occasions successive governments have tried for a change to enable retail outlets to open on Sunday! This will if allowed to happen under this government l can see many a family unit suffering! We already have lost the time when families would sit around the dinner table to share a meal, has gone by the way of the dodo! So this leaves the only day when all the family can spend time together with their children.

It has always seemed that shop keepers and now certain retail outlets have expected their workers to turn in come rain or shine, whilst managers and directors are languishing by their pools!

So l say a resounding NO! to Sunday opening not on religious grounds, not on be a kill-joy but for the good of harmony in households!

Sunday should be a family day to break bread and share together!

#conservatives, #liberal-democrats, #olympic-games, #retail, #shopping-hours, #sunday, #sunday-telegraph, #sunday-trading-act-1994