Religion, heaven, hatred, JFK, John Lennon, Imagine

Imagine by John Lennon is a song that will stand the test of time, no argument, it is a masterpiece. One thing that I struggle with is when people say “Why would we want no Heaven and no religion t00” I don’t think this was what John was actually meaning, he sang for world peace and like Bob Marley, JFK and his Brother, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King and many more who came with the same message, they were killed, or shot, every time someone with a message of Hope and Peace comes along they get killed. Jesus, the good book tells us came to Earth, he was killed, if Jesus came again, I truly believe we would kill him again. Satan runs this blue globe, we just have people who believe in God and too many Religions

These are his a lyric in his song. NOW, When I ask a religious person who live by their chosen book about say, Noah’s Ark, we know the story is not entirely true, but there may be truth somewhere in the story, two of every Animal on a boat today would be impossible. I get told “Shaun it’s a metaphor” People dislike that line “Imagine there’s no heaven” but look right over many other lines in the song “Imagine all the people living life in peace”

So when people say to me “I don’t like Imagine, why would we want no heaven” I don’t get offended I get confused, not to the stage I want to cry 😀 But I see God as the way, religion was man made, so is flawed. John Lennon believed in God then stopped, he is quoted many times saying religion poisoned his soul, there is a song below, he wanted love and peace, his message was simple, his song’s a metaphor. But when he sang “Imagine there’s no Heaven or religion” REALLY, think, imagine there was not, nor religion, would the World not be a better place? His song was a metaphor, we can’t have our cake and eat it, I ask if the fear of Death makes people add religion to their lives. John also said “We measure God through our Pain”

All I know is, for me and what I see, people turn to God in times of trouble, I do also, but I also thank God when things are going good, how many don’t do this. My mother told me “Never talk Religion or Politics” Well sadly I am very opinionated and in this blog I cover both subjects. I dislike the fact we can’t talk religion on the presumption it WILL cause an argument, if that is so, then am I right? I am asking here, I mean to offend nobody, my big ‘ol brain just got turning on this one

Religion is not the problem I said it a few blogs ago, people are. I was playing this song earlier and I remember I put it on my Song of the day once and got abuse for it, yeah abuse from religious god loving people

John isn’t saying “Imagine there is no God” IT IS A METAPHOR, he is singing about a World of peace. The exact same metaphor as most if not all of the bible, stories with a truth behind them. We can’t know the bible is true, we can only have faith in its words. If anyone can show me every word is true, bring it on. But I don’t need words to love MY God, same God you love, and to pray every day

Just Imagine a life, a world with no religion, just people loving God, now would that not be good? Also Lawyers and CEO’s, but that is another blog. I truly believe people who dislike Imagine need to educate themselves on the meaning of the song. I ask MANY questions from many people about God and the Bible and am told “It’s a Metaphor” Also the peace sign, it’s NOT Jesus upside down on the cross, it means Nuclear disarmament People must educate themselves away from a book, I can prove this but many will believe as they do anyway, like the woman I spoke to who didn’t believe in dinosaurs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_symbols

Many times people have unfollowed me for saying these things, I think these people bring my blog to be true. To dislike someone for asking a question, well they were never a friend. If you have faith and believe every Word of your book, I respect that, but open your mind, just for a second and think away from that book. There is a saying here in Scotland “Never trust anyone with one Book” The joke I believe is or was aimed at Islam, again I have no problems with Islam, just the fundamentalists, but we have Christian fundamentalists in the Westboro Baptist Church.

frz7So I ask, if people who hate all Muslims due to fundamentalists are for real, then should everyone hate all Christians because of Westboro Baptist Church. I am asking a question and I would appreciate ADULTS debate. I may even learn something. I also can’t get my mind around people who want to talk about Gay Marriage and Abortion when the World is on the brink of war! STOP FIGHTING OVER WHO MADE THE WORLD AND US AND COME TOGETHER ON WHO IS KILLING IT AND US!!

JFK was our last hope, our last chance. nobody will come again, he warned us and as you all know, he died 6 days after this speech

I did a blog in my old blog Prayingforoneday and someone, a woman I called a friend said “You can’t ask that, it’s stupid” then unfollowed me. This is a woman of God, but sadly her religion made her hate. I ask, do you think religion makes people hate? There are over 5,000 religions on Earth, why is this? So many branches coming off the same tree of life and all throwing stones at each other

God I love and pray to every day, religion causes so many issues, but it’s the people in religion who hate over 1 song for example.

It’s easy if you try, to just love and not push people away from Church’s, as many do

This was no rant, this was me writing in the hope of debate and as I say, I may learn something new

Should any religious person get angry at me, you are proving my point

I know I am right, but so do you, and there is our problem

More love, less hate

Shaun

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#AceBreakingNews: ” Police Arresting People at LaGuardia Airport on Martin Luther King Day”

Police start arresting protesters blocking La Guardia airport

Published time: January 20, 2014 18:09
Edited time: January 20, 2014 18:40
Police officers began arresting demonstrators outside of LaGuardia International Airport near New York City Monday as Port Authority employees and allies rallied for better working conditions.

During a scheduled march early that afternoon, protesters assembled en mass on the Ninety-Fourth Street Bridge in Flushing, NY and began “occupying” the roadway.

Marching for airport worker justice at LaGuardia airport #MLK: our day!@32BJ_SEIUpic.twitter.com/0fMfoFrYWy

— Ritchie Torres (@RitchieTorres) January 20, 2014

Police were reportedly arresting protesters as of 1 p.m. local time after those on the bridge failed to heed orders to disperse.

The act of civil disobedience was waged on the federal holiday held in honor of slain civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who advocated extensively for workers’ rights during his life.

Arrests have begun at airport worker action outside of LaGuardia airport.pic.twitter.com/3FGG0NEhhK

— Jenna Pope (@BatmanWI) January 20, 2014

Employees of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey — the body that operates LaGuardia and other major transportation hubs across the region — unsuccessfully asked that Martin Luther King Day be treated as a paid holiday, like many other government-affiliated agencies. When their requests were ignored, they planned Monday’s march in response in order to raise awareness of their employer’s practices and to have a platform to protest for better wages.

One of those on the scene, Jenna Pope, tweeted that hundreds of people had marched to the bridge outside of LaGuardia and then sat down in the street in defiance of the police’s orders to not hinder road traffic.

Others on the bridge reported that airport employees were among those being arrested during the peaceful protest. Hector Figuero, the president of 32BJ Service Employees International Union, the largest property services union in the country, was among those reportedly detained Monday afternoon, as was a United States congressman, Rep. Charles Rangel (D-New York).

Among those arrested today standing up in support of airport workers @LGA was congressman @cbrangel #MLKDay pic.twitter.com/QwEoeFZt7v

— Jeff Rae (@jeffrae) January 20, 2014

“No one should work full-time and live in poverty,” the 32BJ SEIU Twitter account quoted Rep. Rangel as saying during a speech shortly before his arrest.

“No one should be one pay-check away from homelessness,” the congressman told the crowd. “That’s why I’m prepared to go to jail today.”

 

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“In Honour of Martin Luther King”

#AceNewsServices says this is a transcript of a Presidential Proclamation — Martin Luther King, Jr.,

 

Federal Holiday, 2014

 

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., FEDERAL HOLIDAY, 2014

 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

A PROCLAMATION

 

Each year, America sets aside a day to remember a giant of our Nation’s history and a pioneer of the Civil Rights Movement. During his lifelong struggle for justice and equality, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., gave mighty voice to the quiet hopes of millions, offered a redemptive path for oppressed and oppressors alike, and led a Nation to the mountaintop. Behind the bars of a Birmingham jail cell, he reminded us that “injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” On a hot summer day, under the shadow of the Great Emancipator, he challenged America to make good on its founding promise, and he called on every lover of freedom to walk alongside their brothers and sisters.

 

English: Dr. Martin Luther King giving his &qu...

English: Dr. Martin Luther King giving his “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on Washington in Washington, D.C., on 28 August 1963. Español: Dr. Martin Luther King dando su discurso “Yo tengo un sueño” durante la Marcha sobre Washington por el trabajo y la libertad en Washington, D.C., 28 de agosto de 1963. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

As we marked the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom last August, we noted the depth of courage and character assembled on the National Mall that day. We honored all who marched, bled, and died for civil rights. And we celebrated the great victories of the last half century — civil rights and voting rights laws; new opportunities in the classroom and the workforce; a more fair and free America, not only for African-Americans, but for us all.

 

We were also reminded that our journey is not complete. It is our task to build on the gains of past generations, from challenging new barriers to the vote to ensuring the scales of justice work equally for all people. And we must advance another cause central to both Dr. King’s career and the Civil Rights Movement — the dignity of good jobs, decent wages, quality education, and a fair deal. Because America’s promise is not only the absence of oppression but also the presence of opportunity, we must make our Nation one where anyone willing to work hard is admitted into the ranks of a rising, thriving middle class.

 

Dr. King taught us that “an individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.” In honor of this spirit, Americans across the country will come together for a day of service. By volunteering our time and energy, we can build stronger, healthier, more resilient communities. Today, let us put aside our narrow ambitions, lift up one another, and march a little closer to the Nation Dr. King envisioned.

 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim January 20, 2014, as the Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday. I encourage all Americans to observe this day with appropriate civic, community, and service projects in honor of Dr. King and to visit www.MLKDay.gov to find Martin Luther King, Jr., Day of Service projects across our country.

 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this sixteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.

 

BARACK OBAMA

 

 

 

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Would that it be True That All Men and Women are Born Equal – Then Equality in Education Would be for All

#AceNewsServices says would that it be true what all politicians say, would that it be true that all that is said will be implemented, would that it be true that what is spoken comes without strings, and would that it be true that all men and women are born equal.    

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civ...

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the 1964 Civil Rights Act as Martin Luther King, Jr., and others, look on. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Secretary of State for Education Michael Gove‘s Speech to the Mayor of London’s Education Conference.      

The other day marked the fiftieth anniversary of John F Kennedy’s assassination – and the death of a president who promised so much for the people of America.

It also – of course – marks the fiftieth anniversary of Lyndon B Johnson’s assumption of presidential office. LBJ’s initials do not inspire the affection in our memories that JFK’s do. But whatever else he did – and did not – do President Johnson achieved something both wonderful and powerful in office – he passed the civil rights legislation which at last allowed African-Americans the opportunity to take their place alongside white Americans as equal citizens of their republic.

When we look at America’s story the crimes of slavery, the horrors of Jim Crow, the ugliness of segregation are all – mercifully – in the past.

But even now – 50 years after Kennedy died, 50 years after Martin Luther King’s I have a dream speech, 150 years after Lincoln declared in the Gettysburg address that all men are created equal, there is still terrible inequality in America.

Martin Luther King leaning on a lectern. Deuts...

Black children face a tougher fight than others to get up and get on – they are less likely to succeed, more likely to fall on hard times.

As President Obama has pointed out – the struggle for civil rights goes on. And the arena in which that fight is fiercest is education. Because black children are less likely to graduate from high school, less likely to go to college and less likely to graduate from college than their peers, their futures are blighted and their horizons are narrower. That is why Barack Obama has said that school reform is the civil rights struggle of our time.

That is why he has championed reforms which create more charter schools, like our academies here, which demand minimum standards for every child, like our national curriculum tests here and which reward great teachers more generously, as our pay and conditions reforms do here.

He has been joined in that fight by African-American political leaders like Cory Booker – the newly elected senator from New Jersey who was mayor of Newark – and Deval Patrick the highly successful 2-term governor of Massachusetts. Other Democrat leaders in cities with large African-American populations – like Rahm Emanuel – have prosecuted the struggle with rare political courage. And Republican leaders who take their heritage as Lincoln’s heirs seriously are in the fight too – which is why Jeb Bush secured so much support across all ethnic communities in Florida and why Governor Chris Christie won by a landslide in New Jersey.

I’m lucky enough to have met many of these politicians – and I admire their commitment to social justice.

The challenge for Britain

Just as I admire the commitment of politicians – across party lines – in our country who are dedicated to advancing opportunity through education. Whether it’s David Laws or Andrew Adonis, Tony Blair or Boris Johnson.

Because we need to fight more energetically for social justice in this country just as they’re doing in America.

We too have anniversaries that should spur us to new action.

Pie chart of religions of African Americans

Pie chart of religions of African Americans (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sixty-five years ago, the Empire Windrush landed at Tilbury, Queen Elizabeth I’s old stomping ground – carrying to these shores the first West Indian immigrants, hoping to start a new life.

Sixty-five years on – we have to ask – have we fulfilled our promise to those new Britons?

Twenty years ago, Stephen Lawrence was brutally murdered on a London street by a gang of racist thugs – one of the darkest episodes in the history of race relations in this country.

Twenty years on – we have to ask – have we created a truly colour-blind society in which every single child in this country, no matter what their background, no matter what their ethnicity, is given an equal opportunity to succeed?

I don’t believe we have – yet.

But I do believe we are getting there – making progress – and making progress because this government is committed heart and soul to the civil rights battle of our time – the fight to give every child a great school.

For too long, there have shocked, stubborn gaps in attainment between children from black and minority ethnic backgrounds and their peers.

These things are never simple, either to see, or to fix.

But even as we can identify many different factors at work, one huge reality remains. The gaps in achievement between BME children and their peers have been far too large for far too long.

At key stage 1, black children show the lowest proportion of pupils achieving the expected level in reading, writing, maths and science.

At key stage 2, a smaller proportion of black pupils than of any other ethnicity achieve the level we expect to see in English and maths – a full 3 percentage points below the national average. In fact, there is a staggering gap of 14 percentage points between black pupils and the top-performing ethnic groups about how many children achieve a level 4 or above in maths.

At age 16, almost 3 in 5 pupils in the country achieved 5 or more A* to C grade GCSEs or equivalent including English and mathematics last year. But only around half of all black pupils managed to do so.

At age 18, fewer black pupils than the national average achieve 2 or more A levels or equivalent qualifications.

And although 8% of all pupils studying at this level in 2009 to 2010 went on to a Russell Group university, the equivalent figure for black pupils was only 5%.

Of course, the challenges faced by BME children are all the greater when they come from materially deprived backgrounds.

We already know that children from disadvantaged backgrounds fall further behind as they move through school.

But the problem is particularly acute for black Caribbean boys. Boys from a black Caribbean background who are eligible for free school meals have been among those suffering from the worst academic performance.

Of course, there is no single change we can make that will instantly transform the education of disadvantaged or minority ethnic children.

That is why this government is determined to radically reform the whole school system.

We are determined do everything we can to make sure that every child, from every background, is given an equal opportunity to succeed.

Over the last 3 years, this has been our top priority.

By giving schools independence and autonomy so that heads and teachers are free to support and challenge all pupils, including ethnic minority pupils, to achieve their full potential.

By embedding higher standards, and higher aspirations, in a new national curriculum and new accountability measures.

By raising the quality of teaching and raising the bar for new entrants to the teaching profession.

And by finally rejecting the soft bigotry of low expectations which has governed education for too long – by refusing to accept that children from poorer homes can’t be expected to do just as well, to achieve just as highly, as their wealthier peers.

School reform extending opportunities

President Lyndon B. Johnson and Rev. Dr. Marti...

President Lyndon B. Johnson and Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. meet at the White House, 1966 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the first education reforms we put in place was the Academies Act – which gave many more schools the chance to enjoy greater freedoms.

When this government came to power, there were just 203 academies. They’re schools with all the freedoms of independent schools – but in the state sector – free to all. They’re free to innovate in every area, to recruit and reward the best staff, and to tailor their curriculum, school day and year to suit pupils and parents.

In the last 3 years on, the number of open academies has grown from 203 to 3,444 – with many, many more in the pipeline.

These new schools are already teaching more than 2 million pupils.

And a crucial – and often-overlooked – fact is that academies are specifically benefitting those BME pupils who most need new educational opportunities.

Many academies have far higher levels of BME pupils than the rest of the state sector, both at primary and secondary.

Almost 40% of pupils in primary sponsored academies come from minority ethnic backgrounds, compared to just 28.5% in all state-funded primaries; and 30.0% of pupils in secondary sponsored academies from minority ethnic backgrounds (compared to 24.2% in all state-funded secondary).

In some schools, the numbers are even higher.

Like Harris Girls’ Academy in East Dulwich – a school in a disadvantaged area where the proportion of students known to be eligible for free school meals is more than twice the national average; almost half of students speak English as an additional language; and around 85% are classified as coming from minority-ethnic groups, mostly black Caribbean or black African.

Yet at its last Ofsted inspection, the academy scored outstanding in all categories – and the value added scores show that students make more progress at Harris Girls’ Academy East Dulwich than at 99% of other state schools in England.

In fact, across all 27 Harris academies – set up by Lord Harris of Peckham, a Streatham boy who is determined to transform London education for the better – 44% of last year’s GCSE cohort came from black or minority ethnic backgrounds (double the figures in 2012 across the country as a whole – just 22%) and 31% just from black backgrounds (almost 10 percentage points higher than the equivalent figure for London in 2012 and fully 6 times as many as across the country as a whole in that year – where the proportion is just 5%).

ARK academies – another of this country’s leading chains – have similarly high BME levels.

In recent years the results of sponsored academies like these have gone up faster than other state-funded schools.

Their performance has continued to improve this year, in fact the longer they are open the better on average that they do.

And BME pupils in sponsored academies outperform pupils from similar backgrounds in comparable local authority maintained schools.

Last year, for example, the proportion of mixed race pupils achieving 5 or more good GCSEs or equivalent (including English and mathematics) rose by just 1.3 percentage points nationally; but by 5.7 percentage points in sponsored academies.

Earlier I mentioned Harris Girls’ Academy in East Dulwich, where around 85% of pupils are classified as coming from minority-ethnic groups. But this year, figures provided by the school show that 67% of all pupils got 5 goodGCSEs including English and maths, 7 percentage points above the national average of 60%.

And across all ARK academies, the school’s own figures show that 58% of black children achieved at least 5 GCSEs at A* to C including English and maths – above the national average for all black children.

So the numbers are clear. Sponsored academies have higher proportions of black children than other state schools – and black pupils’ results are improving faster in those academies than in comparable LA maintained schools.

That’s why the academies programme is a major step forward for racial equality in this country.

It’s bringing high standards and high expectations – the sort of education traditionally available only to the privileged – to those children who have historically been left behind.

Isaac and Rosa, emancipated slave children fro...

Isaac and Rosa, emancipated slave children from the free schools of Louisiana (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And in free schools…

Our free schools programme is another powerful route to greater opportunity for more disadvantaged children.

Free schools are entirely new schools, set up by dedicated and passionate teachers, parents, local communities and charitable organisations in communities often poorly served for generations.

In the last 3 years, 174 free schools have opened and over 100 more are in the pipeline.

What’s more, almost half (44%) of all those free schools open so far are located in the 30% most deprived communities in this country.

These new schools are bringing choice to parents who can’t afford to pay a premium for a house in a prized catchment area.

And they are offering higher standards – free schools are outperforming the rest of the maintained sector. Three-quarters of the first cohort (those open in September 2011) were rated good or outstanding by Ofsted under its tougher new inspection framework. Just 64% of maintained schools inspected under the same inspection regime achieved that.

And free schools achieved that level of success starting from scratch – indeed over the same period only 50% of new local authority schools were rated good or outstanding.

But most important of all, just like academies, free schools are catering disproportionately to BME pupils, with higher proportions of BME pupils than the national average – and, often, higher than the average for their local area.

Overall, 40% of pupils in all mainstream free schools for which we have figures come from minority ethnic backgrounds – compared to a national average in mainstream state schools of 26%.

And the proportion of BME pupils is often disproportionately high in free schools, even compared to other neighbouring schools.

In Krishna-Avanti Primary School in Leicester, the proportion of minority ethnic pupils is more than 33 percentage points higher than in the local authority ; in Rainbow Primary School in Bradford, the proportion of minority ethnic pupils is more than forty-one percentage points higher than in the local authority .

And there are examples here in London too.

At the Greenwich Free School, where all children study politics, philosophy and economics and ICT has been replaced with computer programming, 53% of children are from minority ethnic backgrounds.

At Peter Hyman’s School 21 in Newham, where science classes start in Reception and extra curriculum time is devoted to ensuring all pupils leave with exceptional English language skills, 71% of children are from minority ethnic backgrounds.

Nine in 10 pupils at the Aldborough E-ACT Free School in Redbridge and the Woodpecker Hall Primary Academy in Enfield are from a minority ethnic background – higher than in both local authorities.

Using a rigorous curriculum

What all these successful schools demonstrate is the importance of high expectations – specifically the vital importance of a rigorous and demanding academic curriculum for every child.

Children of every ethnicity and every socio-economic group – not just those in the most expensive schools, or in the most wealthy communities – have an absolute right to be introduced to the best that has been thought and written.

Every child should be able to enjoy the type of knowledge-rich, subject-specific curriculum which gives them the best possible preparation for university, apprenticeships, employment, and adult life.

That means physics, chemistry and biology not play-based learning, project-work and an anti-knowledge ideology.

Every child should have the chance to read great literature – from Charles Dickens to Derek Walcott – appreciate great music – from Ludwig van Beethoven to Jelly Roll Morton – and enjoy great art – from Poussin to Basquiat.

Because these great creative figures help us understand the human condition – they appeal to the emotions and the sensibilities we all share as one human race – and they are the legacy our civilisation has bequeathed to us all.

And every child should have the chance to acquire the proper rigorous qualifications that our best employers and academics value.

Far from such an insistence being oppressive and reactionary it is liberating and progressive.

But don’t just take it from me – listen to Diane Abbott, the Labour MP for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and one of this country’s most active and most respected BME campaigners, has said:

An emphasis on rigorous education and on obtaining core academic subjects is not, as is sometimes argued, contrary to the interests of working class children, and of black and minority ethnic children.

On the contrary, precisely if someone is the first in their family to stay on past school-leaving age, precisely if someone’s family doesn’t have social capital, and precisely if someone does not have parents who can put in a word for them in a difficult job market, they need the assurance of rigorous qualifications and, if possible, core academic qualifications.

I couldn’t have put it better myself – giving every child the chance to enjoy a traditional academic education is the most powerful lever for greater social mobility and racial equality we have.

And monitored by tighter accountability

We want to make sure that as many pupils as possible benefit from new opportunities.

Which is why in our reform of the way we hold schools accountable for results, we’re focusing particularly on the attainment of pupils who’ve been overlooked for too long.

Schools will be expected to close the gap in attainment between children from the most disadvantaged backgrounds and their peers.

We’ve introduced a new secondary accountability system which will no longer concentrate just on the proportion getting 5 GCSEs at A* to C – a flawed approach which perversely incentivised schools and teachers to narrow their focus to just a few subjects and just a few pupils on the C/D borderline.

From 2016, every school will be judged on the progress students make in a combination of 8 subjects (3 from the EBacc, maths and English and 3 other). This will mean that schools in poor areas, which achieve great results for their pupils, get particular credit. It will recognise achievement across all grades, not just between a C and a D – incentivising schools to focus on high-flyers and low-attainers alike. And it will encourage schools to offer (and pupils to study) a broad, balanced range of subjects, including the academic core which is the best possible preparation for employment and further study.

That academic core is the subjects contained in the English Baccalaureate, or EBacc – our new measure looking at how many young people study at least 5 of the essential academic subjects: English and maths, the sciences, foreign languages, history and geography.

Figures from 2012 show that black children were less likely to achieve or enter for the EBacc.

In the country as a whole, 23% of children were entered for the EBacc – but just 18% of black pupils. Sixteen per cent of young people in the country achieved it; just 11% of black children.

But across the whole system, the EBacc has seen the number of children studying those subjects starting to rise.

These increases will help drive up the number of black pupils studying these subjects, in turn – meaning that more BME children leave school with the subjects most prized by employers and universities.

And in London – under the leadership of the mayor – those schools which have the very best record in raising standards for disadvantaged and BMEchildren have been recognised and charged with supporting others to improve. The Mayor’s Gold Club of outstanding schools is a rare – and welcome – example of principled leaders in local government not just accepting the higher standards we have been setting in Whitehall but raising the bar even higher. The beneficiaries of this ambition are the poorest and most disadvantaged children of London – especially those fromBME backgrounds.

Driving forward racial equality

Since this government came to power we have seen the achievements of black and minority ethnic children improve.

At primary school, the proportion of black children achieving level 4 in maths has risen from 75% in 2010 to 80% in 2012 – narrowing the gap with all children.

And at secondary, the proportion of black children achieving 5 A* to C including English and maths has risen from 49% in 2010 to 55% in 2012 – narrowing the gap with all children from 6 percentage points down to 4.

We have seen more schools than ever before – with more freedoms than ever before – transform the lives of more BME children than ever before – by giving them the sort of opportunities which were once restricted to a privileged few.

But there is more – much more – still to do.

That is why it is so welcome that the Mayor of London is not just driving up standards for BME children through the Gold Club – but also helping us to establish new free schools in areas of deprivation and disadvantage.

That is why it is so welcome that more great educators from within the BMEcommunity – Lindsay Johns who works with Leaders of Tomorrow – Dr Tony Sewell of Generating Genius, Devon Hanson of Walworth Academy, and Katharine Birbalsingh who is setting up the new Michaela Community School in Brent – have been given the opportunity to help more young people thanks to our reforms.

And that is why we must not allow the pace of our reform programme to slacken.

Why we must not succumb to what Martin Luther King called the tranquilising drug of gradualism.

Because we have it in our power – in this generation – to fulfil the dream of equality which has inspired so many of the great heroes whose memories we cherish this week.

Conclusion:  

#AceNewsServices says sounds great does it not – would that it be true that it gets implemented – shall we wait and see?  

 

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