(LONDON) SCAM ALERT: Bitcoin Report: Naveed Saghir is a 44-year-old graduate who runs his own successful home cinema business in the north west of England and then he was targeted by Bitcoin Fraudsters #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Sept.05: After a lifetime of hard work, regular saving and shrewd investments, earlier this year he had nearly £500,000 saved in Bitcoin.

#AceDailyNews says that a ‘Bitcoin Fraud’ has cost me £500,000′ as a host of charities have been calling for scam adverts to be included in the government’s Online Safety Bill, which will soon be scrutinised by MPs and Lords….

Naveed Saghir
Dan Whitworth: Money Box reporter, BBC Radio 4

Then, this summer, he was targeted by online fraudsters who stole everything.

“I’ve destroyed my life, changed my life so much for the worse and need to warn people – if it can happen to me it can happen to anyone,” he says.

Naveed is now on a mission. Struggling to get over the mental and emotional damage of seeing his future plans disappear, leaving his financial future wrecked, he wants to share his story to try to stop other people from becoming victims.

“I studied chemical engineering at university and then did a masters in computer science. I’ve been running my business for the last 20 plus years and have always been so careful with money,” he says.

“Whether it’s related to my business or my life I’ve made every penny count. But I made one bad judgement and it’s caught me out”.

Investment scam

Naveed was the victim of a type of fraud known as an investment scam. It’s when victims are conned into handing over money to people offering fake, but often very convincing, investments with the promise of big returns.

“I was watching videos on YouTube, saw an advert offering the chance to invest in stocks and shares and filled in a form requesting more information.

“The next day I got a call from someone who called themselves a customer service agent and paid £250 to start trading. The day after I was called again, this time by someone who described themselves as my account manager and given a username and password for an extremely convincing trading website.”

Naveed made his first payment in late May and as soon as he made that first terrible step the fraudsters had him.

Then it was a case of them engaging Naveed with more deceit, more lies, promises of bigger returns – which soon turned to promises of getting his growing losses back, and each time tricking him into transferring them more and more money.

By the end of August he’d been tricked into paying £18,000 sterling and 14.25 bitcoins – worth more than £500,000 at today’s exchange rate.

“I still can’t mentally recall how I’ve been suckered in,” Naveed said. “I just don’t know.”

Naveed SaghirNaveed still struggles to understand how criminals were able to make him a victim

One of those, the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute, said that millions of internet users, particularly those with mental health problems, were in danger of losing money or sensitive personal information to scammers.

No justice

Lisa Forte works for Red Goat Cyber Security and says not only is Naveed unlikely to get any of his money back but he’s also unlikely to get any justice.

“Even if the police start an investigation, which is unlikely, even if they find the criminals responsible, which is very unlikely, what are they supposed to do when the criminals are almost certainly in a foreign country where British police have no jurisdiction?

“There is pretty much zero recourse in regards to the Bitcoin. It’s a form of currency that operates outside of regulation compared to ‘normal’ money and because of this, because it’s not regulated – consumer protection is just not there.”

As for her advice, there are three main things people can do to try to help themselves, or pass on to family and friends, to stop them from becoming victims.

“One, do your research into anything you’re going to put your assets into and there are lots of reliable sources out there.

“Two, understand what Bitcoin is, like you should do with any investment, know how it works and know the pros and cons.

“Three, if someone is saying they’ll be able to use your investment to get your big returns in a short period of time that’s when alarm bells should be ringing. Genuine investment platforms don’t say this and there’s a reason for that.”

You can hear more on BBC Radio 4’s Money Box programme on Saturday at 12pm on Radio 4 or by listening again here shortly after broadcast

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Sept.05: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#bitcoin, #london, #scam-alert

(BRISTOL, U.K.) SCAM ALERT: Actionfraud & Avon & Somerset Police Report: They have identified and supported a number of fraud victims thanks to a new partnership with supermarkets designed to help prevent ‘gift-card-scams #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.28: Officers have since been contacted multiple times by stores who have recognised the signs of customers being coerced into buying gift cards by fraudsters….

#AceDailyNews reports that a new partnership has been setup that helps police protect victims targeted by fraudsters in ‘GIFT CARD SCAM’ …….

Fraud Protect Officers launched the initiative back in April after seeing a noticeable rise in scam cases where victims were being asked to purchase gift cards instead of sending money in the more typical ways……..

Posted at 08:47 on 20th July 2021 in Prevention:

What are scams involving gift cards?

In most cases the requests for gift cards have been a part of a bigger scam where victims have unwittingly handed over thousands of pounds to criminals over a period of time.

It normally starts by fraudsters trying to gain the trust of their victim, and this process can happen over a period of weeks or months. It can be via the internet with someone posing as a person they are not, often involving an element of romance, or over the phone with a fraudster who is lying, claiming to be working for a reputable organisation, such as the police or HMRC.

Having gained the victim’s trust, they will ask them to purchase gift cards for them and will typically invent a time-critical reason as to why they need the victim to help them.

Once the victim has bought the gift cards they are then asked to provide the individual number on the vouchers. The fraudsters may drain the value of the card, but typically sell the gift cards on.  They will usually then ask the victim to go and buy more for them.

Fraud protect officer Amy Horrobin said: “In a large number of these cases, sadly, the victim is taken in by the scam because they are trying to help others, whether that be someone they believe to be a love interest, or a reputable agency.

“These fraudsters are unscrupulous and are only interested in taking people’s money.

Amy Horrobin, fraud protect officer

“It is brilliant that people are increasingly wary that they shouldn’t hand over banking information or transfer money to people they don’t know, but it means these fraudsters are coming up with more elaborate ways to steal innocent victims’ cash. People don’t tend to associate gift cards so readily with scams.

“If you have been a victim, please report it.”

What are Avon and Somerset Police doing?

We approached several supermarkets in the spring and encouraged them to make their staff aware of these scams and provided them with three simple steps to follow:

  • If a transaction seems suspicious, don’t be afraid to challenge the customer and what the purchases are for
  • Look out for anyone who appears to be nervous or anxious about what they are doing
  • Report it to the police if you think someone is in danger, or a crime is being committed

Fraudsters in years gone by have asked victims to buy iTunes or Amazon vouchers, but we have seen an increasing number of crimes involving the purchase of Steam cards. Steam is an online platform where people can download and play games.

Our proactive work has led to staff at Sainsbury’s stores across the force area – or at Argos stores based within the supermarkets – to recognise several customers as a potential fraud victim. They have referred those incidents to us, allowing us to investigate and support the victim by firstly helping them to realise that they are a victim of fraud, and then providing them with advice and the tools to keep themselves safe in the future.

The incidents reported to us include:

  • Sainsbury’s in Taunton contacted us in May amid concerns for a shopper who had made several purchases of Steam cards totalling £140. When we made contact with the victim, it transpired they had been contacted by several people via a gaming app claiming to be single mothers unable to feed their children. In total, he parted with approximately £2,000.
  • That same month, a customer who had bought a number of Steam gift cards over a period of weeks then tried to buy a £500 voucher. When approached by staff at Argos in Street, she said she had been asked to buy them for a man living in America who wanted to marry her. We made contact with the victim and established she was the victim of romance fraud. She had been in conversation online with someone with a fake profile and had sent a total of £4,000 to the fraudster.
  • And in June a shopper in Bridgwater attempted to purchase two £500 Steam gift cards. They had been phoned by someone claiming to be a police officer, claiming a car had been found in Wales with paperwork linking the vehicle to them and that it also contained drugs and guns. The fraudster said that unless gift cards were bought then the woman could be arrested. We’re continuing to support the victim with advice to help them deal with any future phone scam attempts.

We have contacted other supermarkets too and hope to extend this initiative further in the future to prevent more people being scammed.

Fraud protect officer Jordan Coates said: “We’re really grateful for how seriously Sainsbury’s have taken this issue and supported our fraud prevention work. Their staff have allowed us to intervene and almost certainly prevented victims losing out on large sums of money.”

How to spot the signs of gift card scams

Key signs of a gift card scam are:

  • Someone you don’t know, or haven’t met in person, asks you to buy gift cards for them
  • Often they will claim it is an emergency
  • They will often pull at heart-strings and say you are the only person they can turn to

Our advice to anyone who is asked to buy gift cards is to remember that they will never be a legitimate form of payment under any circumstances, so these requests will certainly be part of a scam. Payment in the form of gift cards is convenient for the fraudster, less likely to be intercepted, and difficult to trace back to them, compared with bank transfers.

Amy continued: “Victims often feel pressurised into buying the gift cards by the situation the fraudster places themselves in. This is a deliberate ploy to prey on the victim’s emotions and seek them to make a decision that rationally they would not make otherwise.

“We would urge anyone who finds themselves in this situation to take a step back and think ‘could this be a scam?’ and to ask someone else’s opinion if unsure. If contacted by an organisation saying they need you to buy gift cards, it’s safe to assume it’s a scam.”

Jordan added: “The police, bank or other reputable organisation will never ask you to obtain gift cards for them, in the same way they will never ask for your PIN number or you to withdraw money for them. If unsure, find a phone number for them – don’t use any number provided by the suspect – and call them to check.

“If you are asked to obtain gift cards by someone you have been speaking to online, you are likely a victim of romance fraud.”

Advice from victims

Some of the victims we have helped in recent weeks and months have offered the following advice to people.

One female victim said: “Tell someone else about what is being asked of you. I have a carer who could have helped me but the fraudster told me I could not tell anyone. I felt very isolated and frightened.”

A male victim advises checking how many profile pictures a new request has and look at their biography or description. He said if he’s never met them, they only have two or three photos and minimal personal details he will not engage with them online.

He added: “The language my scammer used was fractured and often did not make sense.”

He went on to praise the work of Avon and Somerset Police fraud protect team, saying: “Thank you Amy and Jordan for everything you have done and continue to do. You saved me a lot of money and I hope by speaking out it helps others.” 

How to report scams

Under-reporting is a real issue with these sorts of crimes as victims wrongly believe they would be wasting our time, there’s nothing that can be done or they feel embarrassed by what has happened.

We urge anyone in this situation to report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or at www.actionfraud.police.uk

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: July.28: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#bristol, #fraudsters, #police, #scam-alert

(U.K.) SCAM ALERT: National Fraud Intelligence Bureau Report: Commonly known calls with the first seven digits (07NNNNN) match the victims own number #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.09: The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) is warning the public to be vigilant of scam calls that appear to be coming from numbers similar to their own. Commonly, the first seven digits (07nnnnn) match the victim’s own number. The calls impersonate well-known government organisations, or law enforcement agencies, and will ask the recipient of the call to “press 1” in order to speak with an advisor, or police officer, about unpaid fines or police warrants.

#AceDailyNews reports over a WARNING to the public about scam calls from “matching” mobile phone numbers similar to their own. Commonly, the first seven digits (07nnnnn) match the victim’s own number.

The calls impersonate well-known government organisations, or law enforcement agencies, and will ask the recipient of the call to “press 1” in order to speak with an advisor, or police officer, about unpaid fines or police warrants.

ACTION FRAUD REPORT:

30-06-2021

New warning from the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB)

In May 2021, Action Fraud received 2,110 scam call reports where the caller’s number matched the first seven digits of the victim’s own phone number. Of these, 1,426 (68%) referred to HMRC or National Insurance.

Victims have also reported receiving these types of calls, and messaging, via widely-used messaging apps, such as WhatsApp.

Protect yourself – What you need to do

  • Government and law enforcement agencies will not notify you about unpaid fines or outstanding police warrants by calling or texting you. Do not respond to any calls or texts you receive about these.
  • Always take a moment to stop and think before parting with money or your personal information, it could prevent you from falling victim to fraud. Remember, it’s okay to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.
  • If you receive a suspicious text message, you can report it by forwarding the message to 7726. It’s free of charge.
  • Suspicious telephone/mobile calls can be reported to Action Fraud via their website: actionfraud.police.uk/report-phishing

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#nfib, #scam-alert, #u-k

(BELFAST, N.I) PSNI SCAM ALERT REPORT: Police are urging people across the country to be extra vigilant following a spate of scams reported recently resulting in the case of a loss of over £30,000 #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – June.05: Over the past few weeks, police have received a number of reports of different scams. One victim was contacted by a male claiming to be from the HMRC who said they were owed money due to unpaid tax and asked them to transfer money to an account. They unfortunately transferred the money and were scammed out of around £13,000.

SCAM ONE: Monday, May 24th, a man received a text message claiming to be from his bank stating there was suspicious activity on his account so it had been suspended and someone would be in touch. He then received a telephone call from a male stating he was phoning from the bank and obtained bank details from the victim, unfortunately, almost £5,000 was removed.

SCAM TWO: Police urge public to be vigilant following scams across NI: On Tuesday, May 18th, police received a report that a man had received a message from someone claiming to be from his bank and stated that someone was attempting to access his account, the message instructed him to ring a number which he did, he was then told on the call to transfer his money into another account, unfortunately he agreed and has been scammed out of almost £13,000

crest-centred.png

Superintendent Gerard Pollock said: “We understand that any amount of money lost to a scammer is a horrible experience for anyone: The threat of fraud, both online and offline, against the public is a constant focus for us and I want to take this opportunity to again appeal to people that on no account should anyone disclose their personal or financial details over the phone; always err on the side of caution. It’s really important that if you have older members of family, talk with them and tell them legitimate providers will never seek their personal details, such as banking information, over the phone. This is a really important conversation to have: Guarding your personal and banking details is essential. Never disclose them to any unauthorised person: If you have any suspicions at all about a call you receive, hang up and phone the organisation the person is claiming to represent to check their authenticity. Ideally, make the call from another telephone so you can be sure the original caller has not remained on the line. Never be pressured into a transaction over the phone.

If you have any concerns about unsolicited calls, emails or letters then please report it to Action Fraud via their website www.actionfraud.police.uk or by phoning 0300 123 2040. You can also call police on the non-emergency number 101.” …….For further advice and information visit www.nidirect.gov.uk/scamwisenior the ScamwiseNI Facebook page @scamwiseni

The Police Service of Northern Ireland is appealing for anyone who witnessed the incident or anyone with any information that will assist the investigation to contact us on the non-emergency number 101. Information can also be passed anonymously via the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

#AceNewsDesk report……Published: Jun.05; 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#belfast, #psni, #scam-alert

(WASHINGTON) SCAM ALERT: FTC REPORT: Government imposters may have hit a new low with a scheme that targets the grieving survivors of people who died of #COVID19 by offering them help paying for their loved one’s funeral expenses.

#AceNewsReport – Apr.15: The program is open to American citizens, nationals of U.S. territories, and non-citizens legally admitted to the United States, regardless of income. If you apply, you’ll need to show documents including receipts for your expenses and a death certificate that says the death happened in the United States or its territories and was likely caused by #COVID19.

#CoronavirusNewsDesk – Scammers target loved ones of #COVID19 victims: ‘A real government relief program will pay up to $9,000 for funeral expenses that people have paid since January 20, 2020 for loved ones who died of COVID-19. Survivors can apply for benefits by contacting the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at 844-684-6333.The number is toll-free and multi-lingual services are available’

The program just began yesterday, but even before it started, FEMA said it had reports of scammers contacting people and “offering” to register them for assistance.

Here’s what you need to know:

  • FEMA will not contact you until you have called FEMA or have applied for assistance. Anyone who contacts you out of the blue and claims to be a federal employee or from FEMA is a scammer.
  • The government won’t ask you to pay anything to get this financial help. Anyone who does is a scammer.
  • The government won’t call, text, email, or contact you on social media and ask for your Social Security, bank account, or credit card number. Anyone who does is a scammer.
  • Don’t give your own or your deceased loved one’s personal or financial information to anyone who contacts you out of the blue. Anyone who does that and asks for that information is a scammer.

FEMA’s Funeral Assistance FAQs have information about the documents you need to apply for funeral expenses. The FAQs also tell you what to do if the death certificate didn’t identify COVID-19 as the likely cause of death, as sometimes happened early in the pandemic.

If you doubt a caller claiming to be from FEMA is telling the truth, hang up and report it to the FEMA Helpline at 800-621-3362 or the National Center for Fraud Hotline at 866-720-5721. Tell us too, at ReportFraud.ftc.gov

#AceNewsDesk report ……….Published: Apr.15: 2021:

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#ftc, #scam-alert, #washington

(WASHINGTON) CFPB Report: SCAM ALERT: Protect yourself from ID theft of unemployment benefits during the #pandemic #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Apr.09: During the pandemic, millions of Americans have filed for unemployment benefits due to job loss and reduced work hours. Unfortunately, scammers are taking advantage of the pandemic and fraudulently filing unemployment claims using stolen personal identity information.

Unemployment benefits scams: How to protect yourself: ‘If you receive a 1099-G tax form for unemployment benefits that you didn’t apply for or receive, you may be a victim of identity theft’

By Sangeetha Malaiyandi –APR 07, 2021

How to protect yourself from unemployment benefit scams:

Learn the four steps you can take to report unemployment benefits fraud and protect yourself and others.

CFB: Learn how to protect yourself and others from fraud and scams during the coronavirus pandemic.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: 09: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#benefits, #cfpb, #scam-alert, #washington

(SYDNEY) SCAM ALERT: NSW Police Report: Officers are appealing for public assistance as they investigate card skimming-related thefts across the Sydney CBD, North Sydney and Darlinghurst #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Mar.31: Last month, officers from South Sydney Police Area Command commenced an investigation after receiving multiple reports of fraudulent credit card activity following the use of ATMs across Sydney:

NSW Police Report: ‘Investigation into credit card fraud following suspected ATM skimming following suspected fraudulent transactions’

Wednesday, 31 March 2021 11:04:32 AM:

During the investigations, detectives were alerted to the following suspected fraudulent transactions:

  • About 6.10pm on Sunday 7 February 2021, $3000 cash was withdrawn from a 58-year-old man’s bank account without his consent from an ATM in the Sydney CBD. A short time later, a further $2500 was withdrawn from the same man’s bank account from an ATM in North Sydney.
  • About 9.30am on Monday 8 February 2021, $2000 was withdrawn from a 77-year-old woman’s account with her consent from an ATM in Darlinghurst.

Investigations identified that the man and woman had both used an ATM at a shopping centre on Danks Street, Waterloo, in early February. 

It is believed their credit card information was fraudulently acquired from the ATM through a skimming device.

As inquiries continue, police have released a CCTV image and are appealing for public assistance to identify a man who may be able to assist with their ongoing investigations. 

The man depicted is described as being aged in his 30s, with a slim build and dark hair. He is depicted wearing a face mask and a bike helmet.

As inquiries continue, police are appealing for anyone who may have any information about suspicious activity in the area at the time, to call South Sydney Police or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Anyone who believes their card has been skimmed is urged to report the matter to the police for investigation.

Additional tips:

  • Be aware of multiple EFTPOS terminals and if you can tap to pay, tap.
  • Only allow your card to be swiped once.
  • Don’t let your card out of your sight and never let anyone see your PIN.
  • Take notice of the terminal the driver is using to process your transaction and ensure it looks legitimate.
  • Regularly check your statements and report any irregularities to your financial institution immediately.
  • Report all suspected cases of card skimming to the police for further investigation.

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Mar.31: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#atm-skimming, #nsw, #police, #scam-alert, #sydney

(WASHINGTON) Justice Dept Report: SCAM ALERT: After they received reports that fraudsters are creating websites mimicking unemployment benefit websites, including state workforce agency (SWA) websites, for the purpose of unlawfully capturing consumers’ personal information: #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Mar.05: Schemes that use links embedded in unsolicited text messages and emails in attempts to obtain personally identifiable information are commonly referred to as phishing schemes. Phishing messages may look like they come from government agencies, financial intuitions, shipping companies, and social media companies, among many others. Carefully examine any message purporting to be from a company and do not click on a link in an unsolicited email or text message. Remember that companies generally do not contact you to ask for your username or password. When in doubt, contact the entity purportedly sending you the message, but do not rely on any contact information in the potentially fraudulent message.

Justice Department Warns About Fake Unemployment Benefit Websites: ‘To lure consumers to these fake websites, fraudsters send spam text messages and emails purporting to be from an SWA and containing a link: The fake websites are designed to trick consumers into thinking they are applying for unemployment benefits and disclosing personally identifiable information and other sensitive data: That information can then be used by fraudsters to commit identity theft’ Unless from a known and verified source, consumers should never click on links in text messages or emails claiming to be from an SWA offering the opportunity to apply for unemployment insurance benefits’

Instead, anyone needing to apply for unemployment benefits should go to an official SWA website, a list of which can be found at: https://www.careeronestop.org/localhelp/unemploymentbenefits/unemployment-benefits.aspx.

If you receive a text message or email claiming to be from an SWA and containing a link or other contact information, please report the communication to the National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) by calling 866-720-5721 or using the NCDF Web Complaint Form found at: www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud.

If you believe you may have entered information into a fraudulent website, resources on how to protect your information can be found at: www.identitytheft.gov.

To learn more about identifying and protecting yourself from phishing attempts, go to: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-recognize-and-avoid-phishing-scams or https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-scams-and-crimes/spoofing-and-phishing.

Further information about the SWA-imposter scheme, and other major scams targeting American consumers, can be found at the Justice Department’s Transnational Elder Fraud Strike Force website: https://www.justice.gov/civil/consumer-protection-branch/transnational-elder-fraud-strike-force.

This alert is provided by the Justice Department’s National Unemployment Insurance Fraud Task Force (NUIFTF) and the Consumer Protection Branch of the department’s Civil Division. Members of NUIFTF include: Department of Labor Office of Inspector General, U.S. Secret Service, Homeland Security Investigations, IRS-Criminal Investigation, U.S. Postal Inspection Service, Social Security Administration Office of Inspector General, and FDIC Office of Inspector General.

Find out more about the NUIFTF at: https://www.justice.gov/file/1319301/download.

For more information about the Consumer Protection Branch, visit http://www.justice.gov/civil/consumer-protection-branch.

#AceNewsDesk report ……….Published: Mar.05: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#doj, #scam-alert, #websites