HAGUE: ‘ Radovan Karadzic Denies he Knew of the Execution of Prisoners at Srebrenica ‘

#AceWorldNews – HAGUE – October 02 – Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic “did not know” of the 1995 massacre of thousands of Muslims at Srebrenica, AFP quoted his lawyer as saying Thursday.

“There is not a single piece of evidence that Dr. Karadzic planned or ordered the execution of prisoners [at Srebrenica], or that he knew about it,” legal advisor Peter Robinson told the Hague-based Yugoslav War Crimes Court.

He is seeking an acquittal of Karadzic on charges of genocide.

The verdict in the five-year trial is not expected before late 2015.

#ANS2014

#bosnian, #hague, #radovan-karadzic, #srebrenica, #war-crimes, #yugoslavia

` Having Seen Decades of War and Violence Omer Karaberg Knows the Power of Words’

#AceGuestNews – May 10 – (RFERL) – Having seen decades of war and violence, Omer Karabeg knows the transformative power of words.    For 20 years, through his program “The Bridge,” he has sought to forge a dialogue among representatives of the former Yugoslavia’s different political, ethnic, and religious groups, whose views on his carefully chosen, contentious topics often could not be more at odds.

Karabeg’s guests run the gamut from hard-line politicians to political moderates to academics and cultural figures. While his pairings are often daring, he always insists on a civil discussion and mutual respect, qualities that are scarce in the region’s mainstream media.

Arbana Vidishiqi, RFE/RL’s Kosovo Bureau Chief, remembered how in 2002, with the wounds of the Kosovo war still raw, Karabeg gathered influential Kosovo Albanians and Serbs in a face-to-face round-table discussion in Pristina.

“That was so rare at that time, just after the war, to see those two sides talking,” said Vidishiqi. “What was especially interesting was to see these former [Albanian] guerilla fighters talking with Serbs even during the breaks.”   Over the course of two decades, “The Bridge” has broadcast more than 800 such dialogues involving more than 1,500 participants.

The 30-minute weekly program began as a radio show and is now also recorded as a Skype broadcast for on-line audiences. On many occasions, the show has broken barriers between figures across political and ethnic divides who have then continued their dialogue in follow-up meetings off the air. Excerpts and quotes from the dialogues are regularly reprinted in high-circulation national newspapers throughout the region.

Much has changed since the first broadcast of “The Bridge” in April 1994 which, at the height of the Yugoslav war, focused on how to start the process of reconciliation between the Serb minority and the Croatian majority in Croatia. At that time, much of the former Yugoslavia was separated not only by ideology, but by violence, blocked roads, and broken telephone lines.

But Karabeg says some divides persist. “The most difficult combination to have on the show is nationalists, of course,” he said. “Nationalists don’t like discussion, they like monologues. They usually don’t change their minds after the show, but at least they talk; at least it gives them something to think about later.”

Originally from Bosnia-Herzegovina Karabeg is a veteran journalist who, before joining RFE/RL in 1994 in the early days of the Balkan Service (then known as the South Slavic Service), was a popular prime-time national TV news anchor in Belgrade.

He left Belgrade after refusing to broadcast nationalist propaganda during the war, an act of defiance for which he was called a traitor on national TV by government officials.   Karabeg is the winner of the 2010 Erhard Busek South East Europe Media Award for Better Understanding in South East Europe.

He received the Independent Journalists’ Association of Serbia’s Jug Grizelj Award for promoting friendship and overcoming barriers between the people in the region. He has published selected dialogues from “The Bridge” in two books: “Bridge of Dialogue: Conversations Despite the War,” and “Dialogue on the Powder Keg, Serbian-Albanian Dialogue.”

While Karabeg has seen much progress in the region, he says the deepest rifts remain in Bosnia, where dialogue between politicians from the two main ethnic entities carved out in the Dayton Accords has broken down.   “Each side has its own media where the politicians can go on and say whatever they want with no one to challenge them when they lie,” he said.

He added that separatist rhetoric has intensified in Bosnia since the outbreak of the Ukrainian crisis, and that the international community must stay engaged there to keep the dialogue going.

” As the saying goes,” Karabeg said, “It’s better to have 1,000 days of talking than to have war for even one day.”

Courtesy and by Emily Thompson of her News and Views – Radio Free Europe

#ANS2014 

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#ans2014, #belgrade, #emily-thompson, #karabeg, #kosovo, #omer-karabeg, #serb, #serbia, #yugoslav-wars, #yugoslavia

#Bosnia : ” US & EU Press Blame `Labour Riots’ on `Allegedly Dysfunctional’ Government”

#AceWorldNews says that during the whole past week the `European Press’ was filled with articles about Bosnia – one of the former republics of Yugoslavia, where recent labour riots left several government buildings burnt.
The press of the United States and of the European Union put the blame on the allegedly dysfunctional government of Bosnia, whose handling of the economy led a number of the problems.

Dmitry Babich

#bosnia, #european, #european-union, #labour-riots, #press, #united-states, #yugoslavia