(WORLDWIDE) IMF REPORT: Clean energy needs may cause years of high prices for copper, nickel, cobalt, and lithium under a net-zero emissions scenario #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Nov.14: The world’s historic pivot toward curbing carbon emissions is likely to spur unprecedented demand for some of the most crucial metals used to generate and store renewable energy in a net-zero emissions by 2050 scenario.

#AceDailyNews says according to a post in IMF Blog …..Soaring Metal Prices May Delay Energy Transition with unprecedented demand for some crucial metals to store renewable energy …..

2021-11-11T16:01:43-05:00(Photo: Petmal/iStock by Getty Images)

By Lukas BoerAndrea Pescatori Martin Stuermer and Nico Valckx

 中文EspañolFrançais日本語PortuguêsРусский

Prices could reach historical peaks for an unprecedented length of time—and even delay the energy transition itself.

A resulting surge in prices for materials such as cobalt and nickel would bring boom times to some economies that are the biggest exporters—but soaring costs could last through the end of this decade and could derail or delay the energy transition itself.

Prices for industrial metals, an important foundation for the global economy, have already seen a major post-pandemic rally as economies re-opened, as we recently wrote. Our latest research, included in the October World Economic Outlook and a new IMF staff paper, details the likely effects of the energy transition for metals markets and the economic impact for producers and importers.

For example, lithium, used in batteries for electric vehicles, could rise from its 2020 level around $6,000 a metric ton to about $15,000 late this decade—and stay elevated through most of the 2030s. Cobalt and nickel prices would also see similar surges in coming years.

Net-zero scenario

We look specifically at the goal of limiting global temperature increases to 1.5 degrees Celsius, which requires a transformation of the energy system that could substantially raise metals demand as low-emission technologies—including renewable energy, electric vehicles, hydrogen, and carbon capture—require more metals than fossil-fuel counterparts.

Our focus is on four important metals among the variety being used for the transition. They are copper and nickel, major established metals that have traded on exchanges for decades, and minor-but-rising lithium and cobalt, which have traded on exchanges only recently but are gaining popularity because they are important for the energy transition.

The fast pace of change needed to meet climate goals, such as the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Net Zero by 2050 Roadmap, implies soaring metals demand in the next decade. Under the roadmap’s ambitious scenario, lithium and cobalt consumption jumps more than sixfold to satisfy needs for batteries and other clean energy uses. Copper use would double and nickel’s would quadruple, though this includes meeting needs unrelated to clean energy.

Metal prices

While metals demand could soar, supply typically reacts slowly to pricing signals, partly depending on production. Copper, nickel, and cobalt come from mines, which require intensive investment and take on average more than a decade from discovery to production according to the IEA. In contrast, lithium often is extracted from mineral springs and brine via salty water pumped from below ground. That shortens lead times for new production to average roughly five years. Supply trends also are influenced by extraction technology innovation, market concentration, and environmental regulations. The combination of soaring demand and slower supply changes can spur prices to climb. In fact, if mining had to satisfy consumption under the IEA’s net-zero scenario, our recent analysis shows prices could reach historical peaks for an unprecedented length of time—and those higher costs could even delay the energy transition itself.

Specifically, cobalt, lithium, and nickel prices would rise several hundred percent from 2020 levels and peak around 2030. However, copper is less of a bottleneck as its demand increases are not as steep. We estimate prices would peak as in 2011, though be elevated for longer.

The demand surge under a net-zero scenario is frontloaded because renewable energy components such as wind turbines or batteries need metals upfront. On the supply side, however, production is slow to react due to the long lead times for opening mines, and only eventually eases market tightness after 2030.

Macro-relevancy

Under a net-zero emissions scenario, booming demand for the four energy transition metals alone would boost their production value sixfold to $12.9 trillion over two decades. This could rival the roughly estimated value of oil production in a net-zero scenario over that period. The four metals could affect the economy via inflation, trade and output, and provide significant windfalls to commodity producers.

The concentrated supply of metals implies some top producers may benefit. Usually, countries with the largest output have the greatest reserves, and likely would be major prospective producers. The Democratic Republic of the Congo, for example, accounts for about 70 percent of global cobalt output and half of reserves. Other standouts include Australia, for its lithium, cobalt, and nickel; Chile, for copper and lithium; along with Peru, Russia, Indonesia and South Africa.

A long-lasting metals boom could also bring substantial economic gains, especially for large exporters. In fact, we estimate that a persistent 10 percent rise in the IMF metal price index adds an extra two-thirds of a percentage point to the pace of economic growth experienced by metals exporting countries relative to importing ones. Exporters also would see a similar magnitude of improvement for government fiscal balances from royalties or tax revenues.

Policy implications

The high uncertainty surrounding demand scenarios is an important caveat. Technological change is hard to predict, and the speed and direction of the energy transition depends on the evolution of policy decisions. Such ambiguity is detrimental because it may hinder mining investment and raise the odds that high metal prices derail or delay the energy transition.

A credible, globally coordinated climate policy; high environmental, social, labor, and governance standards; and reduced trade barriers and export restrictions would allow markets to operate efficiently. This would direct investment to sufficiently expand metal supply, avoiding unnecessarily cost increases for low-carbon technologies and aiding the clean energy transition.

Finally, an international body with a mandate covering metals—analogous to the IEA for energy or the UN Food and Agriculture Organization—could play a key role in data dissemination and analysis, setting industry standards, and fostering global cooperation.

#AceNewsDesk report …………..Published: Nov.14: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here:  https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#carbon, #emissions, #energy, #imf, #metals, #worldwide

(BERLIN) JUST IN: Emissions Report: Germany’s largest consumer protection group filed a lawsuit on Wednesday against car maker Daimler that it said would make it easier for Mercedes owners to gain redress over a diesel emissions scandal #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – July.08: The lawsuit, filed by the VZBV at a regional court in Stuttgart, seeks to set a precedent that would enable owners of Mercedes GLC and GLK cars to gain compensation over software that was allegedly used to trick emissions tests.

BERLIN: German consumer group files diesel emissions lawsuit against Daimler: Those who may have been affected will obtain certainty over whether Daimler AG deliberately installed illegal defeat devices in several vehicle models,” VZBV chief Klaus Mueller said in a statement.

: July.07, 20219:35 AM BST: Updated 18 minutes ago

“Despite official recalls, Daimler AG to this day denies it deliberately manipulated the emissions of its cars. The Stuttgart regional court should declare this. That would bring legal clarity for many consumers who have been affected.”

Daimler said it considered emissions litigation against it to be baseless and would contest the case brought by the VZBV.

The VZBV estimates that a total of 254,000 Mercedes vehicles were recalled in Germany. Its so-called Musterfeststellungsklage – or Model Declaratory Action – covers nearly 50,000 Mercedes GLC and GLK models.

The recall was ordered in 2018 and the VZBV said it was filing its case before Daimler’s potential legal liability expires after a three-year period has elapsed.

Daimler has not admitted wrongdoing in the matter, which is part of the wider ‘Dieselgate’ emissions scandal that has cost rival Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) more than 32 billion euros ($38 billion) in vehicle refits, fines and legal costs. read more 

Reporting by Douglas Busvine and Alexander Huebner, editing by Thomas Escritt

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: July.08: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#berlin, #daimler-ag, #emissions

(LONDON) The International Energy Agency (IEA) Report: Says that no new fossil fuel boilers should be sold from 2025 if the world is to achieve net-zero emissions by the middle of this century #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – May.20: The sale of new petrol and diesel cars around the world would end by 2035: The IEA says that from now, there is no place for new coal, oil or gas exploration or supplies:

U.K. Climate Change: IEA Plan to Ban new gas boilers to reach net-zero emissions by 2025: It’s one of 400 steps on the road to net-zero proposed by the agency in a special report.

19 hours ago:

By Matt McGrath
Environment correspondent

The report has been welcomed as an important contribution on the road to COP26 in Glasgow, when countries will attempt to agree the measures needed to put the Paris climate agreement into practice. 

In that context, tackling the issue of how the world produces and consumes energy is the most critical endeavour.

The energy sector, according to the IEA, is the source of around 75% of the emissions of greenhouse gases that are driving up global temperatures. 

How will we heat our homes?Models designed so they could switch to burn hydrogen could be an option – and will probably be around £100 more than the £2,000 standard gas boiler.

This will help the climate because hydrogen from renewables burns with no emissions.But climate advisors say it will probably only heat around 11% of homes, because hydrogen supply will be limited.So most are expected to be warmed by heat pumps, which extract warmth from the air or the ground, or from water – a bit like a fridge operating in reverse which sell for between £6,000 and £18,000.

They’re subsidised, but MPs say the government needs to offer more help to home owners. What’s more, heat pumps need high levels of insulation which aren’t always possible.

There are other technologies being considered. Geothermal heat may warm places such as Cornwall. Nuclear might figure, too.But the great task of shifting heating from gas will be expensive and difficult. How will we heat homes in zero carbon Britain?

To keep the world safe, scientists say that global heating has to be limited to 1.5C by the end of this century. To keep close to that mark, emissions of warming gases need to drop by half by 2030, and essentially hit zero in 2050.

The IEA’s new study sets out what it believes to be a realistic road map to achieve that aim, while at the same time creating millions of jobs and boosting economic growth. VCGElectric vehicle charge points will have to increase to around 40 million worldwide over the next decadeBy 2050 it envisions a global economy that is twice as big as today, with two billion extra people but with the demand for energy dropping by 8%.The authors say their plan achieves this with no carbon offsets and a low reliance on technologies to remove carbon from the air.

Crucially, it sees no place for new supplies of coal, oil or gas.Key steps to net-zero in 2050Fossil fuel use falls drastically in the net‐zero emissions scenario by 2050, and no new oil and natural gas fields are required beyond those that have already been approved for development. No new coal mines or mine extensions are required.

Emissions from electricity generation fall to net‐zero in advanced economies by 2035 and globally by 2040. Renewables drive the transformation, up from 29% of generation in 2020 to nearly 90% in 2050.The number of public charging points for electric cars rises from around one million today to 40 million by 2030, requiring an annual investment of $90bn by the end of the decade. By 2035, nearly all cars sold globally are electric, and by 2050 nearly all heavy trucks sold are fuel cell or electric. Per capita income from oil and gas in countries that rely on fossil fuel production falls by around 75% from $1,800 to $450 by the 2030s.

However, the IEA’s route to net-zero will require massive investments and international co-operation on an unprecedented scale. It will also have direct impacts on consumers all over the world. Home heating with gas or oil is currently a major source of carbon emissions in many countries, responsible for around 20% of CO2 in the US and the UK.The IEA path to net-zero says that in just four years’ time, there should be no new fossil fuel boilers sold, except where they are compatible with hydrogen.

This will not be an easy shift for the building sector.”It will be very difficult, because it means a massive turn in the consumption behaviour,” said Maria Pastukhova, from the E3G environmental think tank. “The building sector is maybe one of the toughest ones because aside from the emphasis that the IEA has put on efficient buildings, all the old existing infrastructure has to be retrofitted. And that’s a particular challenge for governments.”

“ The IEA says that as well as greening the energy system it will need to be expanded to provide electricity to the 785 million people in the world who have no access at present.Jonas GratzerA worker cleaning solar panels at a solar park – the IEA says a massive expansion is needed: To meet this challenge the world will need to install four times the amount of wind and solar energy than it did in 2020. This equates to adding a massive solar park every day over the next nine years.By 2035 the report says there would be no more sales of new cars with petrol or diesel engines.

All of the world’s electricity would be emissions free by 2040. While the scale of the change is unprecedented, the IEA believes it will create around 14 million jobs by 2030, while investments in energy production soar to $5tn, boosting global GDP.”The scale and speed of the efforts demanded by this critical and formidable goal – our best chance of tackling climate change and limiting global warming to 1.5C – make this perhaps the greatest challenge humankind has ever faced,” said Fatih Birol, the IEA Executive Director.

“ The IEA’s pathway to this brighter future brings a historic surge in clean energy investment that creates millions of new jobs and lifts global economic growth. Moving the world on to that pathway requires strong and credible policy actions from governments, underpinned by much greater international co-operation.” One issue that has caused concern among environmentalists is the reliance in the report on unproven technologies, such as carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS). There are also worries about bioenergy which involves the use of trees, crops and plants to make liquid fuel or to generate electricity.

The IEA path to net-zero sees a significant increase of around 60% in this energy source, with an estimate that energy crops and forestry plantations will take up 25% more land than is used today for bioenergy production.NurPhotoPalm oil has been a major source of bioenergy, used to make diesel”Burning forests for energy is the latest in a parade of false climate solutions,” said Hannah Mowat from Fern, a Brussels-based NGO campaigning to protect forests and people.”Sadly, the IEA has bought into it by proposing wholly unrealistic levels of bioenergy, which will damage forests the world over and worsen climate change. Instead of burning trees for energy, we should focus on cutting fossil fuel use, maximising energy efficiency and increasing renewables such as solar, wind, heat pumps and geothermal.”The IEA Net Zero by 2050 report can be found here.

#AceNewsDesk report ……..Published: May.20: 2021:

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#climate-change, #coal, #emissions, #gas, #iea, #london, #oil

(BEIJING, China.) Iowa Climate Science Education Report: Officials make promises to reduce carbon emissions in their own country whilst pressing ahead with financing coal-plants in developing countries #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Apr.30: In 2020, China opened three-quarters of the world’s newly funded coal plants, according to the UK-based monitor CarbonBrief, and accounted for more than 80 percent of newly announced coal power projects.

#ClimateChange Crisi But China doubles down on coal plants abroad despite carbon pledge at home: China will press ahead with its multi-billion-dollar financing of coal plants in developing countries, a top climate official said Tuesday, despite Beijing’s stated aim of slashing carbon emissions.

By uwe.roland.gross April, 29, 2021

China News VIA Iowa Climate Report

At home, however, President Xi Jinping has pledged to wean China off coal with a peak carbon emissions target of 2030 – and achieve carbon neutrality thirty years later.

Those ambitious targets have been met with international praise.

But China’s overseas drive shows the complexity of untwining the economic drivers of coal power from environmental concerns.

“We cannot simply say that we’ll stop supporting coal-fired electricity plants in developing countries,” Li Gao, head of the climate change office at the Ministry of Ecology and Environment, told reporters.

“Combating climate change is also about letting people in developing countries live good lives.”

Echoing Xi’s comments at a recent climate summit hosted by US President Joe Biden, Li said poorer nations still need coal to power their economies.

“This is wholly in response to (foreign countries’) actual needs, and we use very high standards (to build the plants),” he said.

Li also suggested that these countries were not sufficiently developed to be able to use renewable energy as their main sources of power.

China is the world’s biggest polluter and emits a third of greenhouse gases globally.

It has also continued to fund dozens of coal plants abroad, from Zimbabwe to Indonesia, and environmentalists say they are set to produce more emissions than major developed nations.

China is making the overseas coal play as part of its trillion-dollar Belt and Road Initiative, a plan to fund infrastructure projects and increase its influence overseas.

In contrast, officials have pledged to “strictly control” coal use domestically to reach ambitious climate goals.

Just under 60 percent of power in China still comes from coal, but a new five-year national development plan unveiled in March set a target of generating 20 percent of energy from renewable sources by 2025.

China will continue to build smaller-scale coal plants to ensure reliable power supply across the grid, but their “emissions will not be as large” as traditional coal plants, according to Li.

“We will no longer continue large-scale development of coal-fired power plants, this is very clear.”

China doubles down on coal plants abroad despite carbon pledge at home — Iowa Climate Science Education

#AceNewsDesk report ……….Published: Apr.30: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#carbon, #china, #climate-change, #coal, #emissions

(MICHIGAN) Justice Dept Report: Two Senior Managers in Italy Charged with Conspiracy to Cheat U.S. Emissions Tests and Defraud U.S. Consumers #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Apr.21: According to court documents, Sergio Pasini, 43, of Ferrera, Italy, and Gianluca Sabbioni, 55, of Sala Bolognese, Italy, two senior diesel managers at Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Italy S.p.A. (FCA Italy), a wholly owned subsidiary of Stellantis N.V. — along with a previously charged co-conspirator, Emanuele Palma, 42, of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan — were responsible for developing and calibrating the 3.0-liter diesel engine used in certain FCA diesel vehicles.

‘An indictment was unsealed today in the Eastern District of Michigan charging two Italian nationals, along with a previously charged co-conspirator, for their alleged role in a conspiracy to defraud U.S. regulators and customers by making false and misleading statements about the emissions controls and fuel efficiency of more than 100,000 diesel vehicles sold in the United States by FCA US LLC: Their responsibilities included calibrating several software features in the vehicles’ emissions control systems to meet emissions standards for nitrogen oxides (NOx), a family of poisonous gases that are formed when diesel fuels are burned at high temperatures, while also achieving best-in-class fuel efficiency targets set by FCA US LLC’

The superseding indictment alleges that Palma, Pasini, Sabbioni, and their co-conspirators, purposely calibrated the emissions control functions to produce lower NOx emissions under conditions when the subject vehicles would be undergoing testing on the federal test procedures or driving “cycles,” and higher NOx emissions under conditions when the subject vehicles would be driven in the real world. Palma, Pasini, Sabbioni, and their co-conspirators allegedly referred to the manner in which they manipulated one method of emissions control as “cycle beating.” As alleged, by calibrating the emissions control functions on the subject vehicles to produce lower NOx emissions while the vehicles were on the driving “cycle,” and higher NOx emissions when the vehicles were off the driving “cycle,” or “off cycle,” the three defendants purposely misled FCA’s regulators by making it appear that the subject vehicles were producing less NOx emissions than they were, i.e., in real world driving conditions. Palma, Pasini, and Sabbioni also allegedly made and caused others to make false and misleading representations to FCA’s regulators about the emissions control functions of the subject vehicles in order to ensure that FCA obtained regulatory approval to sell the subject vehicles in the United States. 

The superseding indictment also alleges that Palma, Pasini, and Sabbioni employed “cycle beating” to achieve best-in-class fuel efficiency and make the subject vehicles more attractive to FCA’s potential customers, i.e., by increasing fuel economy and reducing the frequency of a required emissions control system service interval. The superseding indictment alleges that the co-conspirators understood their “cycle beating” calibration would harm consumers who purchased the vehicle, leading them to acknowledge that “there will always be the unlucky customer who will have the misfortune of using our loser cal[ibration].” 

Pasini and Sabbioni are each charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and to violate the Clean Air Act, one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and six counts of violating the Clean Air Act. If convicted, Pasini and Sabbioni each face up to five years in prison on the conspiracy count to defraud the United States and to violate the Clean Air Act, up to 20 years in prison on the conspiracy count to commit wire fraud, and up to two years in prison for each count of violating the Clean Air Act. A federal district court judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Palma is charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and to violate the Clean Air Act, one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, six counts of violating the Clean Air Act, and two counts of making false statements to representatives of the FBI and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Criminal Investigation Division (EPA-CID). If convicted, Palma faces up to five years in prison on the conspiracy count to defraud the United States and to violate the Clean Air Act, up to 20 years in prison on the conspiracy count to commit wire fraud, up to two years in prison for each count of violating the Clean Air Act, and up to five years in prison for each count of making false statements. A federal district court judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Acting Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Kevin O. Driscoll of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division; Acting U.S. Attorney Saima S. Mohsin of the U.S Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Michigan; Acting Assistant Attorney General Jean E. Williams of the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD); Special Agent in Charge Timothy Waters of the FBI’s Detroit Field Office; and Special Agent in Charge Lance Ehrig of the EPA-CID’s West-Central Region made the announcement.

Principal Assistant Chief Henry P. Van Dyck and Trial Attorneys Kyle W. Maurer and Jason M. Covert of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section, ENRD Senior Trial Attorney Todd W. Gleason, and Assistant U.S. Attorneys John K. Neal and Timothy J. Wyse for the Eastern District of Michigan are prosecuting the case.

An indictment is merely an allegation and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Apr.21: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#doj, #emissions, #italy, #michigan

WOLFSBURG: #VW Pulling out of US after cheating 500,000 consumers after it cost them $15-billion in fines by the DOJ NOW they are abandoning the sinking ship and closing all operations to move to the Americas, workers being sold down the river of profit just to FILL the companies coffers – #ProfitB4People – @AceNewsServices

#AceNewsReport – Nov.22: VW puts conquering Americas at heart of turnaround plan
image

Volkswagen will need to conquer the Americas, the region at the center of its emissions scandal, to deliver a turnaround at its core VW brand, Europe’s largest carmaker said on Tuesday as Volkswagen to withdraw from U.S. diesel market: Handelsblatt // Reuters UK
Volkswagen AG’s (VOWG_p.DE) diesel vehicles would not make a return to the U.S. market after the emissions scandal is settled, German daily Handelsblatt reported, citing the automaker’s car division chief, Herbert Diess. (bit.ly/2fo824J)

Europe’s largest carmaker in September 2015 admitted using sophisticated secret software in its cars to cheat exhaust emissions tests, with millions of vehicles worldwide affected.

The cheating allowed Volkswagen’s U.S. vehicles sold since 2009 to emit up to 40 times legally allowable pollution levels.

The German automaker will pay more than $15 billion to settle claims by nearly 500,000 U.S. customers and government regulators over the #emissions scandal.

(Reporting by Divya Grover in Bengaluru; Editing by Maju Samuel)

http://reut.rs/2gHESQy

EDITOR NOTES: Please share and comment on this with consideration for others please …

#BREAKING144 ‘ EPA Aircraft emissions endanger peoples lives ‘

#AceBreakingNews – WASHINGTON:June.10: (WASHINGTON EXAMINER) The Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that emissions from commercial jets cause climate change, endangering the public’s health and welfare.

“Today’s action supports the goals of the President’s Climate Action Plan to reduce emissions from large sources of carbon pollution,” the EPA said in a press release.

The announcement is the first step in regulating the emissions from commercial airlines that most scientists say are to blame for manmade climate change. The regulations fall in step with the agency’s efforts to regulate the emissions from cars, trucks and power plants.

The EPA says it is excluding military and smaller aircraft from the regulations.

@acenewsservices

#aircraft, #climate-change, #emission-standard, #emissions, #environmental-protection-agency, #epa, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas, #health, #international-civil-aviation-organization, #power-station, #reciprocating-engine, #united-states-environmental-protection-agency