#TyphoonMegi Report: After Taiwan it hit China and causes a massive landslide that crashed onto people’s homes in Lishui city on Wednesday as the full force of rain and winds were felt as it made landfall – @AceNewsServices

#AceNewsReport – Sept.29: After #TyphoonMegi makes final landfall in southeast China after clobbering Taiwan – The Weather Channel – http://wxch.nl/2dqe5Hb the typhoon then moved inland through southeast China; winds are weakening, but colossal rain will bring life-threatening flooding and landslides – BBC Weather
http://bit.ly/2d8o9B2 it hit China with full force causing a landslide that destroyed 20 residential buildings in Lishui city, E China’s Zhejiang, leaving dozens of citizens still missing …

w7gnRsoJ_normal.jpg CCTVNEWS (@cctvnews)
28/09/2016, 13:29
Landslide caused by #TyphoonMegi destroys 20 residential buildings in Lishui city, E China’s Zhejiang, with dozens missing pic.twitter.com/uO7hGsz2JC

Chinese state media reports one #killed following #TyphoonMegi landfall in Fujian, southeast – CCTV

Photo: Landslide caused by Typhoon Megi as shown on Chinese state TV, in Lishui city, Zhejiang province CCTV http://bit.ly/2cC8e0y

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

News & Views welcome always published as long as NO bad language or is not related to subject matter.

To keep online information secure, experts recommend keeping your social media accounts private, changing your passwords often, and never answering unsolicited emails or phone calls asking for your personal information. Need help and guidance visit https://acepchelp.wordpress.com and leave a comment or send a private message on Telegram @Aceone31

Ace News Services Site Links Listed Here:

AceTweet This News

#typhoon

TOKYO: ‘ POWERFUL TYPHOON VONFONG CHURNS UP READY TO HIT MAINLAND JAPAN MIDDAY MONDAY ‘

#AceWorldNews  – TOKYO – Braces itself for another powerful Typhoon called Vongfong which is presently churning toward Japan’s main islands Sunday after strong winds and heavy rain left 35 injured in the south.

The monster storm hit the southern Okinawan islands on Saturday and is now moving toward the main Kyushu and Honshu islands, where it is due to make landfall as early as Monday morning, the national weather agency said.

Vongfong—the season’s 19th typhoon—was in the southern area of Kagoshima at midday Sunday, the meteorological agency said, placing it around 230 kilometers west of Amami-Oshima island. 

It is packing gusts of up to 180 kilometers per hour as it moves north-northwest.

“The typhoon is expected to make landfall on Kyushu on Monday morning,” meteorologist Hiroshi Sasaki told reporters of AFP that it will hit landfall around midday Monday.

#ANS2014   

#honshu, #japan, #kyushu, #okinawan-islands, #tokyo, #typhoon, #vongfong

JAPAN: ‘ Nearly 1.7 Million People Take Shelter as Typhoon Phanfone Makes Landfall ‘

#AceNewsServices – JAPAN (Tokyo) – In Japan, nearly 1.7 million people have been advised to take shelter in refugee centres after a powerful typhoon hit the country’s central region.

Typhoon Phanfone, which struck central Japan’s Shizuoka Prefecture, early Monday, also forced the cancellation of more than 600 flights.

Authorities in Tokyo have asked residents to refrain from leaving their homes. They also ordered the evacuation of more than 50,000 people throughout the country.

As a result of the typhoon, at least one person, a US airman, was killed and three others, two US servicemen and a 21-year-old surfer, remain missing.

Winds up to 180 kilometers per hour reportedly gushed through an area near Yokohama, south of the capital, Tokyo.

The storm moved northeast after whirling over the capital, Tokyo, at around 11:00 a.m. (0200 GMT). The typhoon is expected to head directly toward Tokyo.

According to the Japan Meteorological Agency, the country witnesses about 11 typhoons a year.

The latest typhoon comes as rescue teams were still searching for the remains of victims of the volcanic eruption of Mount Ontake which occurred late last month. 

#ANS2014

#aceworldnews, #japan, #phanfone, #typhoon

JAPAN: ‘ Braces itself for Onslaught of Typhoon Phanfone as Thousands Lose Power ‘

#AceWorldNews – JAPAN (Tokyo) – October 05 – Following closely on from the recent Volcano erupting, killing 50 people to date and causing major disruption to the centre of Japan, the people brace themselves for the latest onslaught of a Typhoon Phanfone

 

At least 22,000 households have been left without power in the Amami area in Kagoshima Prefecture, on the most south-westerly main island of Kyushu as powerful typhoon Phanfone moves in, reports Japan’s national public broadcaster NKH.  

At least 58 residents of the area were evacuated.

According to Japan’s Meteorological Agency, the typhoon is 180km east of the island of Amami and is moving north at 15kph.

The typhoon is expected to strike the country’s main islands at about 17:00 GMT on Sunday.

It was only back on July 08 2014 when another Typhoon Neoguri slammed into Okinawa.

#ANS2014

 

#ANS2014

#acenewsservices, #japan, #phanfone, #tokyo, #typhoon, #volcano

How Can The Philippines Recover After Typhoon #Haiyan…

How Can The Philippines Recover After Typhoon #Haiyan As They Are Still Repaying Their #Debts

Transcript:

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: We turn now to the Philippines, where the holidays were observed with a mixture of gratitude and somberness, as the country continues to recover from Typhoon Haiyan, which reduced almost everything in its path to rubble two months ago. Haiyan, the strongest typhoon to ever hit land, affected more than 14 million people in 44 provinces in the central Philippines. It killed at least 6,000 people, displaced more than four million residents, and damaged about one million houses, leaving nearly 1,800 people missing.

On Saturday, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon visited Tacloban, the epicenter of the typhoon, and urged international community to scale up support for Philippines recovery and reconstruction efforts.

SECRETARY-GENERAL BAN KI-MOON: I was deeply moved and also inspired by my visit to Tacloban. People are working hard to recover. We must not allow this to be another forgotten crisis. I urge all donors to add to their already generous response so that we can help communities to build back better and safer.

AMY GOODMAN: That was U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. This week, the U.N. announced an appeal for $ 800 million in international humanitarian relief. So far, only 30 percent of the target has been met.

Amidst the ongoing crisis, some may be shocked to learn that the Philippines’ debt repayments far overshadow all the Typhoon Haiyan relief assistance to date. On Christmas Eve, the Philippines reached a grim milestone: $ 1 billion in debt payments since the typhoon hit. Some of those debts are from the corrupt and abusive regime of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, which enjoyed the early backing of the Reagan administration. In the 1980s, the White House described Marcos as, quote, “an old friend and longtime ally.” During their 20 years in power, the Marcoses embezzled $ 5 to $ 10 billion from their people, according to a joint U.N. and World Bank report. It’s a debt Filipinos continue to carry today.

For more, we go to Washington, D.C., where we’re joined by Eric LeCompte. He is the executive director of Jubilee USA Network.

Eric, welcome to Democracy Now! Talk about this debt and what this means, given how hard hit the Philippines is from the typhoon.

ERIC LECOMPTE: Well, I think, as you explained, the devastation is absolutely horrific on the ground. Six thousand people have died. There’s been economic losses of over $ 15 billion. And there’s a reality, as 10 to 12 typhoons continue to hit the country every year, they’re unprepared for climate change and future catastrophic typhoons, which are expected to arrive and hit shore over the next 10 years. So when we’re looking at the amount of aid so far, it’s been absolutely incredible how countries around the world have delivered about $ 350 million in aid, $ 51 million from the U.S. government alone, but it’s completely dwarfed by the debt payments that are continued to be made by the country of the Philippines. They’re paying down over $ 60 billion in debt. This year alone, they will pay over $ 6.7 billion; since the typhoon hit, over a billion dollars. So, we see that the amount of debt is unsustainable. Over 20 percent of the income of the Philippines goes towards paying down the debt.

And what makes this whole situation even worse is that the roots of this debt are from the corrupt regime of Ferdinand Marcos. And, you know, Ferdinand Marcos, under his dictatorship in the Philippines, more than 3,000 people were killed; 35,000 people were tortured. You know, I was 10 years old when finally the nonviolent revolution unseated the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos. And I will never forget seeing the television images of Imelda Marcos’s shoe collection of over 3,000 designer pairs of shoes. While the country was in poverty, while people were being tortured, this couple was embezzling between $ 5 and $ 10 billion. So, we have to understand that in the current context of what’s happening in the Philippines, that there’s no way the country can get back on its feet without dealing with this unsustainable debt, with its roots in the corrupt Marcos regime.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Well, Eric, your mention of the Marcos regime—I want to turn to an interview that Al Jazeera correspondent Veronica Pedrosa did with Imelda Marcos. This is an excerpt.

VERONICA PEDROSA: He enriched himself, didn’t he?

IMELDA MARCOS: How would he? He was rich.

VERONICA PEDROSA: You were enriching yourselves.

IMELDA MARCOS: He was rich. He was rich when he and I got married. In fact, before he became president, he was number four. And you can see that in an interview in the Reader’s Digest. He was number four in the payment of taxes.

VERONICA PEDROSA: But, Mrs. Marcos, isn’t it true that $ 10 billion of the Philippine treasury money went missing?

IMELDA MARCOS: It’s not true. It’s not true, because then we—I should have been in jail already. I’ll show you the documents.

VERONICA PEDROSA: Well, where is the money, though, madam? If you—it’s OK, you can—yeah.

IMELDA MARCOS: We have not stolen any money.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: That was Imelda Marcos being interviewed by Veronica Pedrosa of Al Jazeera. I wanted to ask you, the Marcoses have been—were overthrown decades ago, and how is it possible that the debt is still being paid by the Philippine government?

ERIC LECOMPTE: Well, a big part of it is interest rates. So, you know, what we know is that the government, the dictatorship, took out more than $ 25 billion in loans, that we know of, that we’re aware of, and that the principal of many of those loans have been paid. But what’s remarkable is that the interest rates have grown to such amount that, you know, the loans have continued to grow. I think one of the problems that we’re seeing—and this isn’t a problem that’s just endemic to the Philippines—but the reality of it is, is of this $ 60 billion of debt, we don’t know completely who it’s owed to, what the $ 60 billion paid for, what benefits happened from the $ 60 billion, and, you know, whether or not the government of the Philippines at any time, even recently, has sought approval of its people in order to transact and to be able to take loans.

AMY GOODMAN: Where was the embezzled money? Why can’t it be found?

ERIC LECOMPTE: Well, you know, so—that’s a U.N. and a World Bank report that say from—what their estimates—and their estimates range between $ 5 billion and $ 10 billion. I’m sure for many of the listeners of Democracy Now!, there’s quite a difference between $ 5 billion and $ 10 billion. It’s astounding that these are just projections. These are just estimates. You know, much of this money was hidden by the Marcos regime. And as the Marcoses fled the Philippines, they certainly took a lot of that money with them.

I think one of the issues that we’re dealing with in the international financial system is also how our financial system supports corruption. Through the use of tax havens, through the use of secret bank accounts, many corrupt officials continue to be able to hide moneys around the world. And I think these are some of the problems that—you know, it’s much bigger than just the Philippines, when we’re counting debt right now in the trillions of dollars around the world, that the financial crisis was caused by high indebtedness, by speculation, and, you know, the international financial system still is not providing rules to deal with these problems.

And when we go back to the Philippines, you know, there still aren’t even rules in place in the Philippines, like in many countries around the world, where a country’s leader needs to seek approval from even their parliament or their congress in order to take out loans and spend that money.

AMY GOODMAN: So, Eric, can you just talk about what you’re calling for?

ERIC LECOMPTE: So, you know, specifically in terms of the Philippines, we join our partners at Jubilee Asia-Pacific and the Freedom from Debt Coalition on the ground in the Philippines, and we’re asking President Jim Kim of the World Bank to immediately have a moratorium on debt payments. The World Bank, as well as the Asian Development Bank, hold the majority of loans in the Philippines right now. So we want a moratorium on the debt.

The second part, which is critical, is there needs to be a public, independent audit. We need to know what the money was spent on, where the money went, how the money was approved, and where the money is now, and actually who all the money is loaned—is owed to. And I think these are critical things in regards to the Philippines.

More broadly, for us at Jubilee USA and our international partners, you know, we want to see debt audits take place around the world. We want to see the implementation of an international bankruptcy process to work out these unsustainable debts. And we want to see basic regulations for responsible lending and borrowing implemented in the international financial system.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And we just have about 20 seconds, and you said that the World Bank has most of the debt, but do you know any of the major U.S. banks that have a portion of the Philippine debt?

ERIC LECOMPTE: So, about 5 percent of the debt right now is either held by the U.S. government or by U.S. banks, again, going back to the Marcos regime. Without an audit, we don’t know the exact breakdowns. So that’s why an audit is so important right now.

AMY GOODMAN: Eric LeCompte, we want to thank you for being with us, executive director of Jubilee USA.

Courtesy of http://whatthegovernmentcantdoforyou.com/2013/12/29/commentary/democratic-watchdog/how-can-the-philippines-recover-from-typhoon-haiyan-while-forced-to-pay-off-ex-dictators-old-debt-2/?

#aceworldnews, #philippines, #typhoon

#Philippines Latest News on #Haiyian

10,000 feared killed in Philippines by super typhoon Haiyan (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

RT: Published time: November 10, 2013 01:02
Edited time: November 10, 2013 14:18
A view of destroyed houses after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Erik De Castro)
Download video (4.52 MB)
 Tags: 

An estimated 10,000 people might have been killed in the central Philippine province of Leyte alone, which was almost completely destroyed by the powerful typhoon Haiyan, local authorities said.

The typhoon has devastated up to 80 percent of the Leyte province area as it ripped through the Philippines, Chief Superintendent Elmer Soria told Reuters.

“We had a meeting last night with the governor and other officials. The governor said based on their estimate, 10,000 died,” Soria said.

Residents fetch free water at a plant of a softdrink company in Tacloban City, Leyte province, central Philippines on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines.(AFP Photo / Ted Aljibe)Residents fetch free water at a plant of a softdrink company in Tacloban City, Leyte province, central Philippines on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines.(AFP Photo / Ted Aljibe)

Most of the dead drowned or were killed by collapsed buildings, authorities say.

The UN’s humanitarian agency puts the figure of people displaced at just under 331,000, while those whose lives have also been “affected” by the typhoon number a huge 4.3 million across 36 provinces.

People walking the streets like ‘zombies’

The situation in the street reminds one witness of a “movie”. Jenny Chu, a medical student in Leyte told Reuters that “people are walking like zombies, looking for food.” 

Meanwhile, reports came in that a big part of Visayas, the group of islands where Leyte and other major islands are located, has sustained great damage.

Mila Ward, a Philippine-born Australian on vacation in Leyte spoke of the human misery that was abundant in the streets everywhere one looked. “They were covered with blankets, plastic,” she spoke of the hundreds of bodies strewn around the streets. “There were children and women,” Ward added.

“It’s like the end of the world”, said another witness – Nancy Chang – who was on business in Tacloblan City and said that she had to walk for three hours through a mess of mud and floating debris to reach a military-led evacuation at the airport.

That airport itself was all but destroyed; with seawater so strong it shattered the glass of the control tower. A Reuters reporter was stranded there, recounting how the water had risen to four meters.

“It was like a tsunami. We escaped through the windows and I held on to a pole for about an hour as rain, seawater and wind-swept through the airport…some of my staff survived by clinging to trees. I prayed hard all throughout until the water subsided,” said the reporter, 47-year-old Efren Nagrama, who discovered five bodies while in the chapel there.

Police have been deployed to patrol the ruins of Tacloblan to prevent looting as desperate residents look for food and water, said Philippine Interior Secretary Mar Roxas, describing the situation as “horrific.”

Thousands of homes lie destroyed near the fishport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013. (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)Thousands of homes lie destroyed near the fishport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013. (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)

“The dead are on the streets, they are in their houses, they are under the debris, they are everywhere,”said Lim, adding that only about 400 bodies have been recovered so far.

The Red Cross said earlier that 1,200 people we confirmed dead in the Philippines.

Roxas said earlier on Saturday that it was too soon to announce any final figures.

A fishing boat which slammed into damaged houses lie atop debris after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013. (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)A fishing boat which slammed into damaged houses lie atop debris after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013. (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)

“The rescue operation is ongoing. We expect a very high number of fatalities as well as injured,” Roxas told AP. “All systems, all vestiges of modern living — communications, power, water — all are down. Media is down, so there is no way to communicate with the people in a mass sort of way.”

Government officials are still waiting to make contact with Guiuan, with its population of 40,000, located in the Mindoro province. The UN says that 80 percent of it is now underwater.

Survivors assess the damage after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 9, 2013 (Reuters)Survivors assess the damage after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 9, 2013 (Reuters)

The storm weakened on Saturday after moving away from the Philippines toward Vietnam.

Vietnamese authorities evacuated over 500,000 people to safer areas in preparation for the tumult which is forecast to make a landfall on Sunday afternoon, but that did not stop the disaster from claiming six lives and injuring dozens there too.

International relief effort mission

Philippine President Benigno Aquino III said the priority for the government was to restore communications and power in remote areas and to deliver relief and medical assistance to families.

The Philippine Red Cross is preparing for a relief mission “because of the magnitude of the disaster,”says Richard Gordon, the agencies head.

Residents take a bath and wash their belongings next to debris along a road in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines.(AFP Photo / Ted Aljibe)Residents take a bath and wash their belongings next to debris along a road in Tacloban, on the eastern island of Leyte on November 10, 2013 after Super Typhoon Haiyan swept over the Philippines.(AFP Photo / Ted Aljibe)

But logistically speaking getting aid to the devastated regions of Leyte, 560 km from the capital could be difficult as the airport was destroyed.

Russia’s emergencies ministry has offered to help by providing search and rescue personal and a mobile hospital.

“If necessary, we will fly two planes to the Philippines with an operational group of 50 people,” Russian Emergencies Ministry spokeswoman Irina Rossius told Itar-Tass. But that figure later changed to 200 rescuers, if the request is made, said the Ministry, adding that “among them are six dog teams intended for rescue work in collapsed buildings,” said Irina Rossius, a representative of the Ministry.

A boy carrying a plastic bottle of water walks past a car which slammed into damaged houses after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013.(Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)A boy carrying a plastic bottle of water walks past a car which slammed into damaged houses after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines November 10, 2013.(Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)

US Secretary of State John Kerry said that Washington “stands ready to help.” In the meantime the US navy is assessing the extent of the damage on the ground.

The UN will also be involved in the relief effort, the UN Disaster Coordination Team (UNDAC) has arrived in the city of Tacloblan.

“The United Nations agencies in the Philippines, with their humanitarian partners, are supporting the Government and other responders in their efforts to assess the situation and respond rapidly with vital supplies, through the coordination system led by the local authorities,” said Emergency Relief Coordinator Valerie Amos.

A damaged car is seen in front of the airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines, November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)A damaged car is seen in front of the airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines, November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)

UNICEF estimates that up to 1.7 million children could be affected by the typhoon.

“UNICEF’s first priorities are focused on life-saving interventions – getting essential medicines, nutrition supplies, safe water and hygiene supplies to children and families,” said UNICEF’s representative in the Philippines, Tomoo Hozumi.

In addition, the World Food Programme (WFP) has so far allocated $2 million for the response as it sent 40 metric tonnes of high-energy biscuits to the victims.

A number of NGOs are also mobilizing their resources to help the families in the Philippines. These include names like Save the Children, World Vision and Habitat for Humanity, as well as an LA-based US relief agency called Operation USA.

Meanwhile, Operation USA, a Los Angeles-based international relief agency is calling for donations to aid recovery efforts and funding for grant distribution to local agencies in the affected areas.

Vehicles that were washed away by floodwaters are seen at a rice field near the airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines, November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)Vehicles that were washed away by floodwaters are seen at a rice field near the airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city, central Philippines, November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Romeo Ranoco)
Philippine military C130 cargo planes (L) ferrying supplies park at the tarmac outside an airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Erik De Castro)Philippine military C130 cargo planes (L) ferrying supplies park at the tarmac outside an airport after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in central Philippines November 9, 2013 (Reuters / Erik De Castro)

 

#acedisasternews, #2001-pacific-typhoon-season, #asia, #benigno-aquino-iii, #leyte, #mar-roxas, #mindoro, #november-10-2013, #philippine, #philippine-red-cross, #philippines, #philippines-november-9-2013, #reuters, #saturday, #tacloban, #typhoon, #typhoon-haiyan