Air Force prepares to dismantle HAARP ahead of summer shutdown


Antennas for the newly completed High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is seen near Gakona, Alaska

The U.S. Air Force gave official notice to Congress Wednesday that it intends to dismantle the $300 million High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program in Gakona this summer. The shutdown of HAARP, a project created by the late Sen. Ted Stevens when he wielded great control over the U.S. defense budget, will start after a final research experiment takes place in mid-June, the Air Force said in a letter to Congress Tuesday. The University of Alaska has expressed interest in taking over the research site, which is off the Tok Cutoff in an area where black spruce was cleared a quarter-century ago for the Air Force backscatter radar project that was never completed. But the school has not volunteered to pay $5 million a year to run HAARP.

Responding to questions from Sen. Lisa Murkowski during a Senate hearing Wednesday, David Walker, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for science, technology and engineering, said this is “not an area that we have any need for in the future” and it would not be a good use of Air Force research funds to keep HAARP going. “We’re moving on to other ways of managing the ionosphere, which the HAARP was really designed to do,” he said. “To inject energy into the ionosphere to be able to actually control it. But that work has been completed.” Comments of that sort have given rise to endless conspiracy theories, portraying HAARP as a superweapon capable of mind control or weather control, with enough juice to trigger hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes. Scientists say all of that is nonsense, and that the degree of ionosphere control possible through HAARP is akin to controlling the Pacific Ocean by tossing a rock into it.

Built at a cost of more than $290 million, the site has 180 antennas on 30 acres that are used to direct energy into the ionosphere, which is 55 miles to 370 miles above the Earth, and monitor changes in the flow of charged particles. Stevens was the godfather of HAARP, which he helped start two decades ago with annual earmarks slipped into the defense budget. At the hearing on defense research and innovation, featuring six representatives of the Pentagon, no one said HAARP has a future in the defense budget.

Pinksapphiret2·Via You Tube

Walker said the Air Force has maintained the site for several years and the last project is one by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Once completed, the site will close. DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar said, “The ‘P’ in DARPA is projects. We’re not in the business of doing the same thing forever, so very naturally as we conclude that work, we’re going to move on. It’s not an ongoing need for DARPA despite the fact that we had actually gotten some good value out of that infrastructure in the past.”

Walker said the Air Force would like to remove critical equipment this summer to avoid the expense of winterization. Alan Shaffer, assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering, said HAARP is a “world-class facility,” but the department does not need it any more. “With all the other issues and problems and challenges facing the department at this time, we just don’t see that that investment, over a long-term period, is where we would prioritize our investment,” said Shaffer.

“No one else wants to step up to the bill, ma’am,” Shaffer said to Murkowski. On another topic, Murkowski asked Shaffer about small modular nuclear reactors for remote areas. She said, for example, Eielson Air Force Base could benefit from “reliable energy security that nuclear power can provide.” Shaffer said the “sticker shock” of an initial $1 billion investment for a small nuclear reactor is a huge obstacle.

#alan-shaffer, #alaska, #assistant-secretary-of-defense, #dismantle-haarp, #gakona, #h-a-a-r-p, #haarp, #late-sen-ted-stevens, #sen-lisa-murkowski, #us-air-force

US to Spend $300 Million On Huge Spy Hub In Britain


Royal Air Force Croughton, a US Air Force base near Milton Keynes, England

The United States is planning to spend over $300 million to turn one of its military bases in Britain into a spying hub.

Royal Air Force Croughton, a US Air Force base near Milton Keynes, England, currently serves as a relay station for CIA agent communications and is planned to be turned into one of Washington’s largest spying hubs outside the US mainland, theIndependent reported on Sunday.

Once the $317 million project is complete in 2017, the site will become an ultra-secure spying center with more than 1,000 personnel stationed at the facility to cover operations in Africa. The center is likely to be co-staffed with representatives of British intelligence.

The base is already believed to be used as a support site for US drone strikes in Yemen. Reports revealed last year that RAF Croughton was used to gather data from a global network of spy bases inside US embassies and send them back to Washington.

The United States is planning to spend over $300 million to turn one of its military bases in Britain into a spying hub.

Royal Air Force Croughton, a US Air Force base near Milton Keynes, England, currently serves as a relay station for CIA agent communications and is planned to be turned into one of Washington’s largest spying hubs outside the US mainland, the Independent reported on Sunday.

Once the $317 million project is complete in 2017, the site will become an ultra-secure spying center with more than 1,000 personnel stationed at the facility to cover operations in Africa. The center is likely to be co-staffed with representatives of British intelligence.

The base is already believed to be used as a support site for US drone strikes in Yemen. Reports revealed last year that RAF Croughton was used to gather data from a global network of spy bases inside US embassies and send them back to Washington

Documents revealed by American whistleblower Edward Snowden have shown that the United States and Britain, which are key members of the English-speaking intelligence sharing alliance known as ‘Five Eyes’ club, have been cooperating to spy on other countries’ officials and leaders.

One such document revealed last year that Britain’s Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) helped the US National Security Agency monitor phone calls and email communications of foreign leaders and diplomats at the 2009 G20 summit in London.

NSA documents obtained by Snowden showed other members of the ‘Five Eyes’ club – Australia, Canada, and New Zealand – also helped the US to spy on people and officials in other countries.

Leaked documents in November showed that the NSA spied on the G8 and G20 summits held in the Canadian city of Toronto in 2010, with the help of the host country’s government.

It was also made public in October that Washington has been secretly using Australian embassies throughout Asia to intercept phone calls and collect data across the continent.

Via Daboo7

#britain, #england, #huge-spy-hub-in-britain, #milton-keynes, #raf-croughton, #royal-air-force-croughton, #us-air-force, #us-to-spend-300-million, #washington