(WALES, U.K.) Data Privacy Report: Hundreds of footballers have threatened legal action against the data collection industry, which could change how information is handled #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.13: Led by former Cardiff City, Leyton Orient and Yeovil Town manager Russell Slade, 850 players want compensation for the trading of their performance data over the past six years.

#AceDailyNews says according to BBC Sports News footballers are demanding compensation over their ‘private data misuse’ and threaten legal action…..Letters before action” have been sent to 17 big firms, alleging data misuse: They also want an annual fee from the companies for any future use.

By Nick Hartley
BBC Wales NewsFootballers ‘have right to see where data goes’

Data ranges from average goals-per-game for an outfield player to height – however, Mr Slade has previously expressed concern this is sometimes wrong.

If the group pursues legal action and is successful, it could lead to a radical change of a multi-billion pound industry behind professional sport that trades on players’ information. 

Slade’s legal team said the fact players receive no payment for the unlicensed use of their data contravenes General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) rules that were strengthened in 2018.

Under Article 4 of the GDPR, “personal data” refers to a range or identifiable information, such as physical attributes, location data or physiological information.

BBC News understands that an initial 17 major betting, entertainment and data collection firms have been targeted, but Slade’s Global Sports Data and Technology Group has highlighted more than 150 targets it believes have misused data.

Consent issues

Cardiff City manager Russell Slade is leading the group: While receiving a fee for the use of their data might not have much impact on the high earners of the Premier League, Slade feels strongly that those lower down the pyramid, in both the men’s and women’s game, would see tangible benefits: It’s incredible where it’s used,” Slade said. “On one player, and I’m not talking about a Premier League player or even a Championship player, there was some 7,000 pieces of information on one individual player at a lower league football club: There are companies that are taking that data and processing that data without the individual consent of that player: A big part of our journey has been looking at that ecosystem and plotting out where that data starts, who’s processing it, where it finishes and that’s a real global thing: It’s making football – and all sports – aware of the implications and what needs to change.”

How widespread is data collection?

The use of data in sport is nothing new. Its collection, distribution and use has become a staple part of the modern sporting environment, be it by clubs to manage player performance, or by third party companies to base things like odds on.

If the move is successful, the implications could have far-reaching effects beyond football.

BBC News understand discussions are already underway within other professional sports to bring potential legal action regarding the trading of data.

Former Wales international Dave Edwards, one the players behind the move, said it was a chance for players to take more control of the way information about them is used.

Having seen how data has become a staple part of the modern game, he believes players rights to how information about them is used should be at the forefront of any future use.

“The more I’ve looked into it and you see how our data is used, the amount of channels its passed through, all the different organisations which use it, I feel as a player we should have a say on who is allowed to use it,” he said.

Getty ImagesThe footballers say they want compensation and an annual fee for the use of their data

“Anyone else in the world would have that say. Just because we’re footballers and we’re in the public domain that gets overlooked.

“If you were in another job, if you were a teacher or a lawyer and this sort of details was being passed around your field of work it wouldn’t sit right with that person.

“I don’t think we, as individuals really differ from that.”

The lawyer behind Global Sports Data and Technology’s action, Chris Farnell, believes it could be start of a sport-wide reshaping of how data is traded.

“This will be significant change if the precedent is set throughout football and how data is used throughout sport in general,” he said.

“It will change significantly how that data is being used and how it’s going to be rewarded.”

#AceNewsDesk report …………………..Published: Oct.13: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#data, #football, #privacy, #u-k, #wales

(SILICONE VALLEY, Calif.) Google Privacy Report: If you’ve ever been curious about what secrets they know about you, here’s your chance to find out: Here’s a quick way to see first-hand #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Mar.29: Imagine for a minute your entire search history was open for everyone to see. That’s a scary thought, right?

How to see everything Google tracks about you and erase it: Here’s what secrets Google knows about you and embarrassing queries aside, there are certain things you should never search using Google for an entirely different reason. It can totally open you up to scams and malware. Tap or click for seven risky search terms to avoid.

37 mins ago

Fox News Flash top headlines for March 27

And then there are things you’d rather not have accessible to the world. Here’s how to remove your home from Google Street View.

Prepared to be shocked

First, make sure you’re signed in to your Google account. If you’re using Chrome and see your photo or initial in the top right corner, you’re good to go. Otherwise, go to myaccount.google.com and sign in.

Next, open a new browser tab and search for the term “Google ad settings.”

Click the first result that pops up. This brings you to your ad personalization page. It displays a long list of what Google “knows” about you and topics the company thinks you are most interested in.

You’ll likely see dozens of results. A quick search may show that you are obsessed with the Royal family or even something more obscure like school supplies.

Google’s assumptions aren’t always right. Take my results. Google thinks I don’t have children, male and like heavy metal music. But amid those three strike-outs, Google nailed it with tech, jets, and tea.

Stop ad personalization with a click

Now that the fun (or unsettling) part is over, time to get to work. These private details are compiled from all the searches you’ve done, links you’ve clicked, YouTube videos you’ve watched, articles you’ve read, and more.

Maybe you scanned through your list and were glad to see just how off Google was when it comes to your interests. Or maybe they were a little too on the money for comfort.

You can switch off the ad personalization settings at the top of your Google ad settings page with one easy click. Be sure to click Advanced to expand another box. Here you can allow or prevent Google from using data from “websites and apps that partner with Google” to personalize further what you see across the web.

You can also find out more about why specific details have ended up on your profile.

Click on an interest or demographic to get a pop-up that gives you a bit more information about why it’s part of your profile. Choose “turn off” to delete this demographic entirely, removing the tag from your profile.

 Erasing your data

If you toggled ad personalization off, don’t expect to stop seeing ads. It also doesn’t mean you have wiped your data from Google’s databases entirely.

To do that, you need to dive deeper into your Google account settings. We’ve got a step-by-step guide showing you how to erase everything you can.

The first step, of course, is clearing your search history and activity:

  • Go to myaccount.google.com and log in. Click Manage your Google Account.
  • Click on Manage your data & personalization, located under Privacy & Personalization.
  • Under the Activity controls panel, you will see checkmarks next toWeb & App activity tracking, Location History, and YouTube History. Click each one to adjust your settings. You can toggle them off to stop further tracking.
  • Below Activity controls, click on My Activity under Activity and timeline.
  • On the menu that appears in the left sidebar, click Delete activity by. Select how far back you would like to delete your history in the pop-up menu. Click Delete to confirm.

Ace Related News: Sick of being tracked? Use these Google alternatives for search, mail, and more.

#AceNewsDesk report …………Published: Mar.29: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#california, #data, #google, #privacy

THE WHITE HOUSE WANTS TO ISSUE YOU AN ONLINE ID CARD – Police State USA

Another step to “Police State America” here, links below and video, this isn’t good for you guys in the USA, having an Internet Licence, so you are logged on mobile phones, tablets. laptops, PC’s and any other device. Why do this?

A few years back, the White House had a brilliant idea: Why not create a single, secure online ID that Americans could use to verify their identity across multiple websites, starting with local government services. The New York Times described it at the time as a “driver’s license for the internet.”

Sound convenient? It is. Sound scary? It is.

237996-privacy-bill-of-rightsNext month, a pilot program of the “National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace” will begin in government agencies in two US states, to test out whether the pros of a federally verified cyber ID outweigh the cons.

The goal is to put to bed once and for all our current ineffective and tedious system of using passwords for online authentication, which itself was a cure for the even more ineffective and tedious process of walking into a brick-and-mortar building and presenting a human being with two forms of paper identification.

The rub is that online identity verification is heaps more convenient for citizens and cost-effective for government agencies, but it’s also fraught with insecurities; federal and state governments lose billions of dollars a year to fraud, and that trickles down to taxpayers.

Meanwhile, the technology for more secure next-gen authentication exists, developed by various tech firms in the public sector, but security groups have had a hell of a time implementing any of them on a broad scale. Enter the government, which proposed the national ID strategy to help standardize the process using a plan called the “identity ecosystem.”

The vision is to use a system that works similarly to how we conduct the most sensitive forms of online transactions, like applying for a mortgage. It will utilize two-step authentication, say, some combination of an encrypted chip in your phone, a biometric ID, and question about the name of your first cat.

But instead of going through a different combination of steps for each agency website, the same process and ID token would work across all government services: from food stamps and welfare to registering for a fishing license.

The original proposal was quick to point out that this isn’t a federally mandated national ID. But if successful, it could pave the way for an interoperable authentication protocol that works for any website, from your Facebook account to your health insurance company.

There’s no doubt secure online identification is a problem overdue for a solution, but creating a system that would work like an all-access token for the internet is a scary can of worms to open.

To start, there’s the privacy issue. Unsurprisingly, the Electronic Frontier Foundation immediately pointed out the red flags, arguing that the right to anonymous speech in the digital realm is protected under the First Amendment. It called the program “radical,” “concerning,” and pointed out that the plan “makes scant mention of the unprecedented threat such a scheme would pose to privacy and free speech online.”

And the keepers of the identity credentials wouldn’t be the government itself, but a third party organization. When the program was introduced in 2011, banks, technology companies or cellphone service providers were suggested for the role, so theoretically Google or Verizon could have access to a comprehensive profile of who you are that’s shared with every site you visit, as mandated by the government.

Post-NSA revelations, we have a good sense for the dystopian Big Brother society the EFF is worried about. As the organization told the Times, at the least “we would need new privacy laws or regulations to prohibit identity verifiers from selling user data or sharing it with law enforcement officials without a warrant.”

Then there’s the problem of putting all your security eggs in one vulnerable basket. If a hacker gets their hands on your cyber ID, they have the keys to everything.

For now, this is all just speculation. The program is just entering a test phase with select state government agencies only (there are currently plans to expand the trial out to 10 more organizations.)

But it’s not far-fetched to think we’re moving toward a standardized way to prove our identity in cyberspace the same way we do offline.

The White House argues cutting down on inefficiencies and fraud would bolster the information economy. In an era where we have cars that drive themselves and flying robots delivering beer, you have to wonder how much longer people are going to put up with standing in line at the DMV for four hours to hand a teller (with a taxpayer-paid salary) a copy of your birth certificate and piece of mail to prove you are you.

If an analysis of the pilot programs in Michigan and Pennsylvania find the centralized ID saves time and money and spares us the DMV line, privacy advocates are going to have a hell of a fight ahead of them.

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-white-house-wants-to-issue-you-an-online-id

http://yourtubenews.ning.com/forum/topics/alert-the-white-house-wants-to-issue-you-an-online-id?commentId=3181219%3AComment%3A752001

http://beforeitsnews.com/chemtrails/2014/04/alert-the-white-house-wants-to-issue-you-an-online-id-2447060.html

#authentication, #fraud, #government-agencies, #government-services, #internet, #local-government-services, #national-id, #online-id, #online-identification, #passwords, #power, #privacy, #security, #the-white-house, #white-house

` Edward Snowden will speak out in a `Video Conference’ about `Government Intrusion into Privacy ‘ in a panel discussion being held in Texas ‘

#AceSecurityNews says that the former US security contractor Edward Snowden will participate remotely in a panel discussion next week in Texas about governmental intrusion into privacy, Reuters reported.

Snowden is in Russia and faces arrest if he sets foot on US soil.

He is expected to answer questions via video conference at the South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin on Monday, according to conference organizers. Snowden is to speak on how the US National Security Agency uses technology to keep tabs on people.

#ASN2014

#edwardsnowden, #privacy, #reuters, #texas, #us-national-security-agency

#NSA : “High Court Agrees to Delve into Privacy and Technology to Test Whether Cellphones and Smartphones Can be Searched without Warrant”

#AceBreakingNews says WASHINGTON — Delving into the legal jungle of privacy and technology, the Supreme Court agreed Friday to consider two cases that test whether cellphones and smartphones can be searched without a warrant.

The cases, which could be heard by the court in April and decided by late June, involve searches performed by police that turned relatively minor traffic and drug infractions into major felony convictions. In both cases, the crucial information was found on the suspects’ mobile phones.

On one level, the cases represent an inevitable Supreme Court entry into the world of cellphones, owned by more than nine in 10 American adults. In the past few years, courts from California to Texas to Florida have split over the issue of cellphones and digital content.

For more on this story, go to http://usat.ly/1dYBqU3.

#california, #cellphones, #florida, #privacy, #smartphones, #supreme-court, #technology, #texas, #washington

#NSA Fake War on Terror: ” Hidden Agenda as Prevention of Terrorist Attacks”

#AceSecurityNews says the US National Security Agency’s spying programs are not aimed at preventing terrorist attacks, but the agency’s “fake war on terror” is about “control and dominance,” says Stephen Lendman, an author and radio show host in Chicago.

Activist Friend Bomb“The #NSA claiming its spying to foil terror is a bald-faced lie,” Lendman said in an interview on Wednesday. The claims are “absolutely false,” he said. “I have proved it myself in my own writings over a number of years.”

The American activist said the #NSA spying “is not about foiling terrorism. It’s about control. It’s about dominance at home. It’s about ending personal privacy.”

Lendman called for a halt in the US government’s widespread spying activities. “Something needs to be done about it,” he said.

According to a recent study by the New American Foundation, the #NSA’s massive data collection has barely helped the United States thwart terrorist attacks.

#NSA spying revelations over the past six months have caused “a lot of public outrage,” Lendman said. But the outrage has not been enough to change government’s surveillance policies, he added.

“Unfortunately it does not translate into street action, it does not translate into activism. There may be a lot of angry Americans around, but they’re doing pathetically little to protect their own rights.

Stephen Lendman’s MP4

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

#acesecuritynews, #chicago, #national-security-agency, #new-america-foundation, #nsa, #privacy, #terrorism, #united-states, #war-on-terror

“Thought Your Facebook Friends List was Private? Think Again!”

"Facebook Friends Lists Vulnerability"#AceSecurityNews says thought you “Facebook Friends List” was private not according to the latest news from security company “Quotium”  is that a flaw can leave your friends list open to attack.

With attacks being on the rise, Facebook is often targeted by hackers for the information it possesses. Users rely on Facebook to maintain their privacy to the best of Facebook’s ability.

FB responded that: “If you don’t have friends on Facebook and send a friend request to someone who’s chosen to hide their complete friend list from their timeline, you may see some friend suggestions that are also friends of theirs. But you have no way of knowing if the suggestions you see represent someone’s complete friend list.” However, research of this issue has shown that most of the friends list, often hundreds of friends, is available to the attacker. In any case, even a partial friends list is a violation of user-chosen privacy controls.

Since this vulnerability renders the privacy control to hide friend’s lists from other users irrelevant, we hope Facebook will change its mind and this flaw will be addressed.

Thanks goes to Irene Abezgauz, VP Product Management at Quotium and Seeker Research Centre Leader who is credited with the discovery of this vulnerability.

#acesecuritynews, #contact-list, #facebook, #facebook-friends-list, #friends, #irene-abezgauz, #privacy, #product-management, #quotium, #security, #social-network

Surveillance of Communications Must Never be Conducted without Independent Judicial Oversight – Unless it is to Respond to National Security Threats

privacy

privacy (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

#AceSecurityNews says a draft resolution to protect the right to privacy in the digital age that was approved this week by a General Assembly committee is a first step, according to an independent UN expert who called for more to be done to ensure trust in the safety of communications.

“If States are truly committed to ensuring that all the rights which apply offline continue to be valid online, they urgently need to take concrete steps to secure respect for the privacy of communications as a universal right everywhere – not only within their own borders,” the Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression, Frank La Rue, <“http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=14033&LangID=E“>said in a news release yesterday.

The General Assembly committee dealing with human rights questions, also known as the Third Committee, on Tuesday unanimously approved the text recognizing the need for States to establish oversight mechanisms to ensure transparency and accountability for surveillance initiatives. The 193-member Assembly is expected to vote on the non-binding resolution next month.

“To demonstrate their commitment to protect privacy and to ensure people can communicate freely, States can start by immediately revising their own laws and the role of the judiciary, in order to correct serious gaps that exist in most national legal frameworks,” said Mr. La Rue.

He emphasized that the surveillance of communications must never be conducted without independent judicial oversight, even though it might be exceptionally required to monitor communications in order to respond to criminal activity or national security threats.

Parliaments should also play a role through the systematic review of the work of security and intelligence entities.

Human Rights

Human Rights (Photo credit: h de c)

Blanket and indiscriminate surveillance should never be legal,” Mr. La Rue stressed. “International human rights standards demand that any interference with human rights be considered on a case-by-case basis in which a court weighs the proportionality of the benefit to be gained against the harm which may be done.”

Despite technological changes, the expert felt that no new international legal instruments are needed. “Privacy is a recognized human right. For decades there has been a solid understanding that privacy in postal services should be respected by all States. Therefore, there are no reasons for questioning existing guarantees to privacy in telephone or internet communications,” he said.

Independent experts, or special rapporteurs, are appointed by the Genevabased UN Human Rights Council to examine and report back on a country situation or a specific human rights theme. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work.

 

#frank-william-la-rue, #general-assembly, #geneva, #human-right, #human-rights, #national-security, #non-binding-resolution, #privacy, #united-nations, #united-nations-human-rights-council, #united-nations-special-rapporteur, #united-states

RT: Reports Green for Go for Internet Privacy Resolution

privacy

privacy (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee)

#AceSecurityNews says UN human rights committee unanimously passed a ‘right to privacy‘ resolution sponsored by Germany and Brazil that protects the right to privacy against illegal surveillance, following revelations about NSA spying.

The resolution states that surveillance and data interception by governments and companies “may violate or abuse human rights.”

This is the first document that establishes protection of human rights in the digital sphere, Brazil’s Ambassador Antonio de Aguiar Patriota told the AP. It “establishes for the first time that human rights should prevail irrespective of the medium, and therefore need to be protected online and offline,” Patriota said.

The resolution is concerned with the “the negative impact” that surveillance, “in particular when carried out on a mass scale, may have on the exercise and enjoyment of human rights.”

German Ambassador Peter Wittig added, “Is the human right to privacy still protected in our digital world? And should everything that is technologically feasible, be allowed?”

France, Russia and North Korea were among the 55 countries that co-sponsored the resolution that only made indirect references to US global spying techniques.

The fact that the resolution was unanimously passed by the committee seems to guarantee that it will get the votes of all 193 members of the General Assembly in December. Although the resolution will not be legally binding, it will have some political weight.

The US did not go against the measure, though it did lobby the ‘Five-Eyes’ intelligence sharing alliance of UK, Britain, Australia and New Zealand to water down the language of the resolution. By the end of the day, language stating that foreign spying would be a rights violation was weakened, according to AFP.

Privacy

Privacy (Photo credit: g4ll4is)

#Human Rights Watch specialist Philippe Bolopion lamented that the language had been watered down. But, Bolopion still believes that it was “a vital first step toward stigmatizing indiscriminate global surveillance.”

Brazil and Germany introduced to the UN General Assembly their draft resolution in early November, calling for internationally recognized rights to privacy. The document further urged an end to global electronic espionage and the extension of internet freedom.

The resolution comes amid international scandal over #NSA spying over much of the world’s population and eavesdropping on a number of foreign leaders, including Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

NSA spying revealed by former intelligence contractor #Edward-Snowden revealed that Washington has spied on at least 35 world leaders besides the exposed the mass surveillance against private citizens and business.

According to Snowden’s leak intelligence agencies from all signatories of the ‘Five Eyes’ agreement – the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand – collaborated with the #NSA

Since Snowden’s leaks surfaced in June, protests demanding more privacy protections have emerged in countries around the globe, with thousands of people worldwide having joined in recent Million Mask March rallies organized by the amorphous Anonymous movement.

RT:

 

#humanrights, #antonio-patriota, #brazil, #dilma-rousseff, #germany, #human-rights, #national-security-agency, #north-korea, #peter-wittig, #privacy, #united-nations-general-assembly, #united-states

Can Optical Character Recognition Software – Provide Answer to Security with Emails

Just months after Edward Snowden controversially lifted the lid on digital surveillance being conducted by the U.S. and other governments, the issue of on-line privacy is back in the spotlight.
Earlier this month Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg expressed concern that users’ trust in internet companies had been damaged by the revelations. Google’s Eric Schmidt also called for greater transparency from the U.S. government over surveillance.
Sang Mun’s response was more direct — the Korean designer has created four new fonts called ZXX that aim to disrupt the Optical Character Recognition (OCR) systems used by Google and others to analyze text.http://edition.cnn.com/2013/09/30/tech/web/nsa-contractor-surveillance-proof-font/

#acesecuritynews, #edward-snowden, #facebook, #google, #ocr, #privacy

GCHQ Can Tap your Fibre Optic Cables To Access Your Privacy

According to the Guardian – The sheer scale of the agency’s ambition is reflected in the titles of its two principal components: Mastering the Internet and Global Telecoms Exploitation, aimed at scooping up as much on-line and telephone traffic as possible. This is all being carried out without any form of public acknowledgement or debate.
One key innovation has been GCHQ’s ability to tap into and store huge volumes of data drawn from fibre-optic cables for up to 30 days so that it can be sifted and analysed. That operation, codenamed Tempora, has been running for some 18 months. Read the whole sorry saga at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2013/jun/21/gchq-cables-secret-world-communications-nsa

#data-mining, #gchq, #guardian, #nsa, #privacy, #security

Giant US government Internet spying scandal revealed!

The Washington Post and The Guardian have revealed a US government mass Internet surveillance program code-named “PRISM”. They report that the NSA and the FBI have been tapping directly into the servers of nine US service providers, including Facebook, Microsoft, Google, Apple, Yahoo, YouTube, AOL and Skype, and began this surveillance program at least seven years ago. (Imageclarifying slides)

 

These revelations are shaking up an international debate.

 

Start Page has always been very outspoken when it comes to protecting people’s privacy and civil liberties. So it won’t surprise you that we are a strong opponent of overreaching, unaccountable spy programs like PRISM. In the past, even government surveillance programs that were begun with good intentions have become tools for abuse, for example tracking civil rights and anti-war protesters.

 

Programs like PRISM undermine our Privacy, disrupt faith in governments, and are a danger to the free Internet.

 

StartPage and its sister search engine Ixquick have in their 14-year history never provided a single byte of user data to the US government, or any other government or agency. Not under PRISM, nor under any other program in the US, nor under any program anywhere in the world. We are not like Yahoo, Facebook, Google, Apple, Skype, or the other US companies who got caught up in the web of PRISM surveillance.

 

Here’s how we are different:

 

  • StartPage does not store any user data. We make this perfectly clear to everyone, including any governmental agencies. We do not record the IP addresses of our users and we don’t use tracking cookies, so there is literally no data about you on our servers to access. Since we don’t even know who our customers are, we can’t share anything with Big Brother. In fact, we’ve never gotten even a single request from a governmental authority to supply user data in the fourteen years we’ve been in business.

  • StartPage uses encryption (HTTPS) by default. Encryption prevents snooping. Your searches are encrypted, so others can’t “tap” the Internet connection to snoop what you’re searching for. This combination of not storing data together with using strong encryption for the connections is key in protecting your Privacy.

  • Our company is based in The Netherlands, Europe. US jurisdiction does not apply to us, at least not directly. Any request or demand from ANY government (including the US) to deliver user data, will be thoroughly checked by our lawyers, and we will not comply unless the law which actually applies to us would undeniably require it from us. And even in that hypothetical situation, we refer to our first point; we don’t even have any user data to give. We will never cooperate with voluntary spying programs like PRISM.

  • StartPage cannot be forced to start spying. Given the strong protection of the Right to Privacy in Europe , European governments cannot just start forcing service providers like us to implement a blanket spying program on their users. And if that ever changed, we would fight this to the end.

 

Privacy.

 

It’s not just our policy – it’s our business.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Courtesy of

Robert E.G. Beens
CEO StartPage.com and Ixquick.com

#aol, #facebook, #fbi, #google, #guardian, #ixquick, #nsa, #prism, #privacy, #search-engines, #security, #skpe, #social-media, #startpage, #twitter, #washigton-post, #yahoo, #youtube

Scoopinion Reads You While You Are Online

 

HTML Code

HTML Code (Photo credit: Sebastian Fuss)

 

A brand new application that is now in start-up mode can follow you and read what you are reading! Also it can calculate how long you are reading an article!
I wonder how long it will be until it can tell me when l need a cup of tea or l am hungry?

 

Anyone would like to read more visit the link below!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bianca-bosker/scoopinion-personalized-magazine_b_1755997.html?

 

 

 

#education, #feature-story, #helsinki, #httpwww-facebook-comacedebtnews, #huffingtonpost, #privacy, #reading, #reddit, #scoopinion, #social-media, #techcrunch, #twitter

FTC Seeks Comments on Additional Proposed Revisions to Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule

Privowiki main page screenshot

Privowiki main page screenshot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

FTC Seeks Comments on Additional Proposed Revisions to Children’s Online Privacy Protection Rule

Children’s On-line Privacy Protection Rule has not changed since 1999 and this will be the first real overall of the system.

With the rise of social media ever on our mind it has become a matter of not just how ,we protect our children! But the fact we must at all costs shield them from the type of people who will at any cost, exploit their social appetite for such sites as Facebook and the like!

As the rise of social media has grown to obtain every extra morsel of information about our lives, it has led to many cases of children being exploited for gain! As in the past we have moaned and tried to stop our children consuming sugary drinks or eating quick snacks and we failed.

This time it is different and we must act now and l welcome any changes that will strengthen this act and provide a way to protect their fragile minds!

This time we must not fail them, they are our future!

via FTC Seeks Comments on Additional Proposed Revisions to Children’s On-line Privacy Protection Rule.

#child, #children, #childrens-online-privacy-protection-act, #coppa, #federal-trade-commission, #ftc, #httpwww-facebook-comacedebtnews, #internet-privacy, #personally-identifiable-information, #privacy, #security, #social-media