‘ California Battling with Renewable Energy Paradox ‘

#AceNewsServices – CALIFORNIA – September 24 – That giant sucking sound you hear on the West Coast these days is the state of California, hoovering up as much renewable energy as neighbouring states can produce.

' Giant Wind Farm in Wyoming '

‘ Giant Wind Farm in Wyoming ‘

The latest development: a proposal from four major energy companies to build an $8 billion wind energy farm in Wyoming to power the city of Los Angeles.

' Wyoming Wind Farm to Los Angeles Homes '

‘ Wyoming Wind Farm to Los Angeles Homes ‘

Within the next decade, some cities like L.A. are expected to see power needs increase by as much as 18 percent, and a lot of that energy needs to be clean. The state has some of the most ambitious renewable standards in the entire country: By 2020, nearly a third of its power has to come from renewable sources.

Though the wind project would be supplying power to Southern California, all of it would be sourced from outside the state. Bloomberg reports:

The project includes a 2,100-megawatt wind farm in Wyoming, a 525-mile (845-kilometre) power line and a $1.5 billion storage facility, the developers said today in a statement. Duke-American Transmission, a joint venture of Duke Energy Corp. (DUK) and American Transmission Co., Dresser-Rand Group Inc. (DRC) and two others will propose the project to the Southern California Public Power Authority by early 2015.

This project would be the 21st Century’s Hoover Dam — a landmark of the clean energy revolution,” Jeff Meyer, managing partner of Pathfinder Renewable Wind Energy, said in the statement. 

All told, the wind project is expected to produce about 9.2 gigawatt-hours per year.

' Hoover Dam '

‘ Hoover Dam ‘

To compare, the Hoover Dam, which supplies hydroelectric power for Nevada, Arizona, and California, produced an annual average of 4.2 gigawatt-hours of electricity from 1999 to 2008.

Officials are still grappling with the “renewable energy paradox” — finding the balance between the push for clean energy and its unintended environmental consequences. A day before Bloomberg’s coverage of the proposed wind project, officials announced plans to parcel out 22.5 million acres across southern California deserts like the Mojave for large-scale energy projects and new habitat conservation areas, amid reports birds being scorched mid-air at the state’s Ivanpah solar plant near the Nevada border.

There’s no word yet on the potential environmental impacts of the proposed wind farm and if passed, it probably would not be completed until at least 2023. 

But for now, Hoover Dam, enjoy the limelight as one of America’s most beloved feats of engineering.

Your days as a tourist trap could be numbered.

Source:

#ANS2014

#arizona, #california, #hoover-dam, #los-angeles, #mojave, #nevada, #west-coast, #wyoming

` Us Navy has said Military Pilot has been killed in a crash whilst on a training exercise in western Nevada’

#AceWorldNews says that the US Navy has said that the military pilot had been killed in the crash, a day after a fighter jet went down during a training exercise in western Nevada.

Rescue crews reached the site of Saturday’s crash on a Navy range training complex east of Naval Air Station Fallon amid a snow storm in mountainous, remote terrain. US Pacific Fleet said officials determined the pilot’s status on Sunday.

The F/A-18C, a US Marine jet on loan to the Naval Strike and Air Warfare Centre, went down about 70 miles (113km) east of Naval Air Station Fallon, AP reported.

#ANS2014

#ap, #nevada, #us-navy, #us-pacific-fleet

Two Renown Health Acquisitions Gave it 88 Percent of the Cardiology Market

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commis...

Seal of the United States Federal Trade Commission. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In late 2010, Renown Health agreed to acquire SNCA’s medical practice and hire its 15 cardiologists practicing in the Reno area. Before this, Renown Health did not employ any cardiologists, and the acquisition positioned it as a direct competitor of RHP. In March 2011, Renown Health acquired RHP and hired its 16 Reno-area cardiologists. According to the FTC’s complaint, other than the physicians associated with SNCA and RHP, there are very few cardiologists practicing in the Reno area. Accordingly, the FTC alleged, competition for adult cardiology services was effectively eliminated.

In addition, the contracts between Renown Health and the newly hired cardiologists included “non-compete” provisions, which effectively prevented them from joining medical practices that competed with Renown Health. As a result of the acquisitions and non-compete clauses, the FTC contends, Renown Health currently employs 88 percent of the cardiologists in the Reno area.

According to the FTC’s complaint, Renown Health’s acquisitions of SNCA’s and RHP’s medical practices created a highly concentrated market for the provision of adult cardiology services in the Reno area, in violation of federal law. The complaint alleges that the consolidation of the competing practices into a single cardiology group controlled by Renown Health led to the elimination of competition based on price, quality, and other terms. In addition, according to the complaint, the consolidation increased the bargaining power that Renown Health has with insurers, and this may lead to higher prices for adult cardiology services in the Reno area.

Renown Health, the largest provider of acute care hospital services in northern Nevada, will release its staff cardiologists from “non-compete” contract clauses, allowing up to 10 of them to join competing cardiology practices. Renown Health has agreed to settle Federal Trade Commission charges that its recent acquisitions of two local cardiology groups reduced competition for the provision of adult cardiology services in the Reno area.

Renown Health, based in Reno, Nevada, operates general acute care hospitals and commercial health plans serving the Reno area. Before the recent acquisitions, virtually all of the cardiologists in the Reno area were affiliated with two medical groups – Sierra Nevada Cardiology Associates (SNCA) and Reno Heart Physicians (RHP).

In late 2010, Renown Health agreed to acquire SNCA’s medical practice and hire its 15 cardiologists practicing in the Reno area. Before this, Renown Health did not employ any cardiologists, and the acquisition positioned it as a direct competitor of RHP. In March 2011, Renown Health acquired RHP and hired its 16 Reno-area cardiologists. According to the FTC’s complaint, other than the physicians associated with SNCA and RHP, there are very few cardiologists practicing in the Reno area. Accordingly, the FTC alleged, competition for adult cardiology services was effectively eliminated.

In addition, the contracts between Renown Health and the newly hired cardiologists included “non-compete” provisions, which effectively prevented them from joining medical practices that competed with Renown Health. As a result of the acquisitions and non-compete clauses, the FTC contends, Renown Health currently employs 88 percent of the cardiologists in the Reno area.

According to the FTC’s complaint, Renown Health’s acquisitions of SNCA’s and RHP’s medical practices created a highly concentrated market for the provision of adult cardiology services in the Reno area, in violation of federal law. The complaint alleges that the consolidation of the competing practices into a single cardiology group controlled by Renown Health led to the elimination of competition based on price, quality, and other terms. In addition, according to the complaint, the consolidation increased the bargaining power that Renown Health has with insurers, and this may lead to higher prices for adult cardiology services in the Reno area.

Program’s Numerous Safeguards Make It Unlikely to Harm Competition:

The Federal Trade Commission’s Bureau of Competition staff has issued an advisory opinion letter, in response to a request from the Generic Pharmaceutical Association (GPhA), stating that the staff will not recommend a challenge to an initiative intended to help the U.S. Food and Drug Administration respond to the unprecedented increase in shortages of critically important medications.

The proposed program, called the Accelerated Recovery Initiative (ARI), would provide the FDA with information that GPhA believes will enable the FDA staff “more efficiently and effectively to accelerate the recovery of critical drugs in short supply.” The staff letter explains that a key element of the ARI is an agreement among drug manufacturers to pool competitively sensitive production information about shortage drugs. As a result, the ARI would raise substantial antitrust concerns if this information were shared among competitors, because such information could facilitate collusion among drug manufacturers.

However, the advisory opinion states, “GPhA has designed the program to safeguard competitively sensitive information” and “to limit the potential that the ARI might result in harm to competition.” Among other things, the letter notes, GPhA has selected an independent third-party to collect and transmit the data to the FDA, and no other party – including GPhA – will have access to the information or any analysis derived from it. In addition, the advisory opinion states, the ARI includes other features intended to minimize the risk that the program would facilitate collusion among drug manufacturers or cause other harm to competition, such as requiring binding commitments on ARI participants not to use the program for anticompetitive ends.

In light of all these safeguards, the FTC staff concludes that the proposed ARI program is unlikely to harm competition. Therefore, the staff has no present intention to recommend an enforcement action to challenge the program, “if it is implemented as described and the safeguards it contains are adhered to in practice.”

#cardiology, #federal-trade-commission, #ftc, #nevada, #reno, #reno-nevada, #renown-health, #snca