(LONDON) Social Care Reform Plans FACT CHECKED Report: To reform the way people pay for social care in England have been voted on by MPs with many concerns over the poorest pensioners #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Nov.24: The government’s proposals were approved but it faced significant opposition from other political parties and some of its own MPs – with concerns that not enough is being done to protect the poorest pensioners.

#AceDailyNews says here are some about social care reform FACT – CHECKED By Reality Check team BBC News

Boris Johnson during a visit to Tharsus headquarters in Blyth, Northumberland

The reforms include a cap – or limit – on the amount people will have to pay towards their personal care.

It will be set at £86,000. After this has been reached, the local authority will pay for the care. 

This does not include living costs such as food, energy bills or accommodation.

There have been claims about how much these changes will benefit people – we’ve been looking at some of them.

Boris Johnson: ‘If you’ve got £100,000 or less, we’ll help you and that doesn’t include your housing asset – your home. There’s a housing disregard for as long as you and your spouse are in it’

As well as the cap, people will be eligible for some financial help from their local council towards the cost of care.

This is means-tested and will be available to people who need social care and have less than £100,000 in assets.

If someone has less than £20,000 in assets, then they won’t have to spend any of those assets on their personal care. 

The question being discussed by the prime minister is when your home counts towards your assets.

He’s right in his explanation. If you are receiving social care at home or if you are in a care home and your spouse is living in your home, the value of the home is not counted towards your assets. That’s called the housing disregard.

If you go into a care home and you do not have a spouse living in your home, then the value of your home is counted towards your assets and you may have to sell it, although there are schemes that allow you to defer the costs, and for the property to be sold after you die.

This is controversial because it is at odds with what the Conservative Party’s 2019 manifesto said.

It promised that: “nobody needing care should be forced to sell their home to pay for it”.

But, as we’ve pointed out before, the government’s language around this has shifted since the manifesto pledge.

The Health Secretary Sajid Javid has said “no-one will have to sell their house in their lifetime”.

And Business Minister Paul Scully told Sky News today: “There will be fewer people selling their houses and hopefully none.”

Jonathan Ashworth: ‘If you are unfortunate enough to need social care and you live in an £80,000 house in say Barrow or Hartlepool or Mansfield, you’ll lose nearly everything’

The first thing to say about this claim from Labour’s shadow health secretary is that this would only be the case if somebody was receiving social care in a care home – not if they were getting care in their own home.

If they were receiving care at home or had a spouse living at home, then the home would not count towards their assets – under the housing disregard.

If this wasn’t the case, the rules mean that you would have to contribute from your savings and other assets towards your social care until you got down to having assets worth £20,000. This could include having to agree to sell your home in future.

So in Mr Ashworth’s example, if the £80,000 house was your only asset, you could lose three-quarters of your assets.

And remember, these figures cover personal care and not other costs such as accommodation and food. People may be eligible for means-tested benefits to help with those costs. 

This piece was updated on 23 November to clarify the means-testing for social care support.

#AceNewsDesk report …………Published: Nov.24: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#fact-checked, #london, #social-care

(LONDON) U.K. Parliament Social Care Funding Report: A new health and social care tax will be introduced across the UK to pay for reforms to the care sector and NHS funding in England, the PM has said on Tuesday #AceHealthDesk report

#AceHealthReport – Sept.08: Boris Johnson said it would raise £36bn for frontline services in the next three years and be the “biggest catch-up programme in the NHS’ history”

#AceDailyNews says that Boris Johnson has outlined a new 1.25% health and social care tax to pay for reforms………..He accepted the tax broke a manifesto pledge, but said the “global pandemic was in no one’s manifesto”……………….However, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the plan was a “sticking plaster”.

Carer helping man

The tax will begin as a 1.25% rise in National Insurance (NI) from April 2022 paid by both employers and workers, and will then become a separate tax on earned income from 2023 – calculated in the same way as NI and appearing on an employee’s payslip.

Income from share dividends – earned by those who own shares in companies – will also see a 1.25% tax increase.

The UK-wide tax will be focused on funding health and social care in England, but Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will receive an additional £2.2bn to spend on their services. 

PM: Social care must be paid for by taxes, not borrowing

Mr Johnson said the proceeds from these rises would lead to £12bn a year going into catching up on the backlog in the NHS created by Covid, increasing hospital capacity for nine million more appointments, scans and operations.

And he pledged that by 2024/25, there would be the ability to help 30% more elective patients than before the pandemic.

The money will also go towards changes to the social care system, where a cap will be introduced on care costs from October 2023 of £86,000 over a person’s lifetime.

All people with assets worth less than £20,000 will then have their care fully covered by the state, and those who have between £20,000 and £100,000 in assets will see their care costs subsidised.

Mr Johnson insisted that with the new tax “everyone will contribute according to their means”, adding: “You can’t fix the Covid backlogs without giving the NHS the money it needs.”You can’t fix the NHS without fixing social care. you can’t fix social care without removing the fear of losing everything to pay for social care and you can’t fix health and social care without long-term reform. “The plan that this government is setting out… will fix all of those problems together.”But Labour’s Sir Keir said the new tax broke the Conservatives’ pledge at the last election not to raise National Insurance, income tax or VAT. He also said the rise would target young people, supermarket workers and nurses, rather than those with the “broadest shoulders” who should pay more. The Labour leader added: “Read my lips – the Tories can never again claim to be the party of low tax.”The leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Ed Davey – who is a carer himself – also said the tax was “unfair”, and said the government’s plan missed out solutions for staffing shortages, care for working age adults and unpaid family carers. Mr Johnson said no Conservative government wanted to raise taxes – but he defended the move as “the right, the reasonable and fair approach” in light of the pandemic, which saw the government spend upwards of £407bn on support. A tax more palatable to voters?Analysis by Peter Saull, BBC politics correspondentUnder Boris Johnson’s plan, your payslip will feature a “Health and Social Care Levy” from 2023 onwards.This is the 1.25% rise in National Insurance rebranded to underline that the money will be ring-fenced for the health and care system.You may well have seen something similar on your council tax bill.Local authorities in England have been able to raise extra money through an “adult social care precept” since 2015. In effect, though, the prime minister is creating a brand new tax.The idea of a specific “NHS and care tax” is something that may well be more palatable to voters.And future occupants of No 10 could struggle to justify getting rid of it.

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts from Twitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#london, #nhs, #parliament, #social-care, #tax, #u-k

(LONDON) #Coronavirus Report: Opinion New Health & Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid after taking his new job last Saturday and his thoughts on the job in hand #AceHealthDesk report

#AceHealthReport – July.04: Moments after the Prime Minister called to ask me to become Health and Social Care Secretary last Saturday night, I spoke to my teenage daughter in the kitchen: You won’t have much to sort out then, dad,’ she said sarcastically….

#AceHealthDesk reports that ‘The Health and Social Care Secretary’ writes in the Mail on Sunday on the current state of the (coronavirus) #COVID-19 #pandemic.

When I came back to Westminster on Sunday morning, I found the biggest in-tray I’ve had at any department – and I’ve run 5.

I’ve spent the last year working with Harvard University on how governments can learn from this pandemic and be better prepared for future challenges, now I’m the one faced with so many of those tough choices.

I feel both the heavy responsibility and urgency that comes with this job.

My first video call on vaccine progress had to be at the same time as the England-Germany match. It was all going well until JVT (Jonathan Van-Tam, the Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England) suddenly took off his headphones because he didn’t want to hear the score before he watched a recording of the match.

It was an honour to start the meeting by thanking the team who have delivered the rollout, including everyone in the NHS, the Vaccines Taskforce and the officials in my department.

Amid the endless policy memos and reams of data, I see 2 immediate challenges. The first is how we restore our freedoms and learn to live with (coronavirus) COVID-19. The second is to tackle the NHS backlog – something that we know is going to get far worse before it gets better.

We are on track for 19 July and we have to be honest with people about the fact that we cannot eliminate COVID-19.

We also need to be clear that cases are going to rise significantly. I know many people will be cautious about the easing of restrictions – that’s completely understandable. But no date we choose will ever come without risk, so we have to take a broad and balanced view. We are going to have to learn to accept the existence of COVID-19 and find ways to cope with it – just as we already do with flu.

The economic arguments for opening up are well known, but for me, the health arguments are equally compelling. The pandemic has hit some groups disproportionately hard. Rules that we have had to put in place have caused a shocking rise in domestic violence and a terrible impact on so many people’s mental health. All the progress we have made is thanks to the sacrifices of the British people – and our phenomenal vaccine programme. The jabs are working. The latest data from the Office for National Statistics shows that 8 in 10 UK adults have the COVID-19 antibodies that help the body fight the disease. The implications of this are huge.

Tragically, the last time we had 28,000 new cases of COVID-19 in a day, we saw about 500 people die each day. On Friday, we had almost 28,000 cases a day, but 24 times fewer people lost their lives.

There will always be the possibility that we have to deal with dangerous new variants that evade the vaccine but I encourage everyone to get their jabs now if they haven’t already done so. It is the single biggest contribution you can make to this national effort.

We have many other crucial health challenges that we need to confront. We protected the NHS to make sure it was there for everyone who needed care. The steps we took saved countless lives but also led to the build-up of a vast ‘elective’ backlog – checks, appointments and treatments for all the less urgent, but often just as important, health issues.

Because of the pandemic, we estimate that about 7 million fewer people than normal came forward for healthcare. Even if only some of that demand returns, we will see enormous pressure on the NHS.

To help meet this demand, build a better NHS and bust the backlog, we need to build on the changes we’ve all embraced through the pandemic, such as using NHS 111 to direct patients to the most appropriate setting to receive care, expanding the use of our pharmacies and encouraging more people to use the NHS app.

We have to keep doing all of that, and more.

Of course, if you are feeling unwell, you need to come forward. The NHS is always there for you – and now in many different ways.

We’re putting record levels of funding into the NHS. In March, we committed a further £7 billion of funding – including £1 billion to begin tackling the elective backlog and about £500 million for mental health services and investment in staff.

And we’re bringing so many more talented colleagues into the workforce. We have record numbers employed in the NHS, with more than 58,300 more staff in hospital and community health services since March last year, including over 5,600 more doctors and 10,800 nurses.

We’re also embracing technology to help staff spend less time on paperwork and more on patients.

It’s time to build on the spirit of innovation we’ve all embraced and use it for the other challenges we face: from finally fixing social care and putting it on a sustainable footing, to tackling the health inequalities that the pandemic has brought to the fore.

I’m determined we get that right.

There’s a lot of work ahead, but if we hold on to the spirit that has seen us through these difficult days, we will have a country that is not just freer, but healthier, too.

#AceHealthDesk report ….Published: July.05: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#coronavirus, #covid19, #health, #london, #social-care