(ENGLAND) Home Care Report: Many councils are not paying companies a high enough hourly rate to cover basic costs like travel time between clients, it says #AceHealthDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.26: Low wages and feeling undervalued are key factors leading care staff to quit, says the report: Councils say they do not have enough money to pay companies more.

#AceDailyNews says according to a report Homecare costs outstrip funding from councils, they say and it means, despite losing staff faster than they can be replaced, companies are unable to raise wages, says the Homecare Association.

By Alison Holt and Judith Burns
BBC News

Care worker with elderly woman

The Homecare Association, which represents some 2,340 care providers, calculates the true minimum cost of providing an hour of homecare in the UK is £21.43.

This covers the minimum wage, travel time, pensions, holidays, training, PPE, office staff and 60p for profit or reinvestment in services. 

Private clients who hire care direct from providers pay an average £24.94 for an hour of homecare, according to separate analysis by software company The Access Group.

But private clients are a minority, with the bulk of homecare (about 70%) funded by the state, says the Homecare Association. 

Inequality

Freedom of Information data collected for the Association shows the average paid by councils in Great Britain and health boards in Northern Ireland is £18.45.

The report found that areas with some of the highest levels of deprivation also had the lowest average fee rates for homecare.

Sorry, this content does not appear to be working

The Homecare Association says with some local authorities still buying homecare by the minute, and little or no funding for better pay, it makes it very difficult to compete with other sectors for staff. 

Richard Walker, chief executive of Optimo Care Group in South Yorkshire, has tried to improve pay and conditions for staff, but says his efforts are limited by local authority funding levels. 

“We’re simply not competing… so I think people go elsewhere…

“It feels like we’re in a harder position now than we’ve ever been before.” 

Richard estimates that, overall, Optimo’s costs outstrip council funding by about 25%, although this varies according to local authority.

“We’re miles away at the moment in terms of the rates that have been paid.” 

The staff shortage means the company is having to turn away referrals – and he finds not being able to give people the help they require when they need it “really tough… quite demotivating”.Pay is not “level with the job you do out there”, says Denise Wickson

Among his staff is Denise Wickson, a home carer for 16 years. 

For Denise, the work brings “great reward, great satisfaction”.

“I love the job,” she says. 

But sometimes she can be up at 05:00 and not finish until 23:00. 

“You never get to switch off, you’re always worried, ‘Is it covered?’. You get called and they say you’re needed to go out. I never say no.” 

Denise says the money is not “level with the job you do out there”, and some people “just go elsewhere where it’s more money and it’s not unsociable hours”. 

‘Crisis point’

The Homecare Association says lack of support in the community can lead to:

  • hospitals unable to discharge patients who are medically ready
  • emergency admissions of people whose conditions deteriorate through lack of appropriate care

“It makes little sense to neglect people at home in the community, wait until they reach crisis point, then admit them to the most expensive setting of care in an acute hospital,” says the report. 

The Association wants central government to “invest properly” in homecare, raising pay to £11.20 per hour, at a cost of £1.6bn a year across the UK, plus:

  • a ban on purchasing homecare by the minute
  • a professional register for care workers
  • social care workers added to the Shortage Occupation List to make it easier to hire from overseas

The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) said: “Councils may want to pay more for care, but their hands are tied, because they simply do not have the money to do so.”

An ADASS spokesperson urged ministers to use Wednesday’s Spending Review to invest in care and support at home to “lift the pressure on family carers, ensure the viability of high quality home care providers, and properly reward the committed, courageous and compassionate people working in social care”.

The Local Government Association (LGA), which represents councils in England, said: “Councils work closely with care providers, and understand their concerns about paying a fair price for the cost of care. 

“Such is the scale of funding pressures, this is proving harder to achieve and we urgently need new national funding to meet immediate pressures in the social care system.” 

The government says a new £162.5m fund will help “bolster” the homecare workforce, while the social care levy, announced last month, includes £5.4bn earmarked for social care over the next three years, with £500m to be spent on the workforce.

But the LGA questions whether the levy will raise enough money to fund crucial reforms, and wants to see a greater share of it go to front-line social care.

#AceHealthDesk report …………….Published: Oct.26: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#care, #england, #health, #homecare, #travel, #u-k, #wages

(LONDON) JUST IN: The National Living Wage is set to rise from £8.91 per hour to £9.50 in the Budget on Wednesday #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Oct.26: The government has come under pressure to help low-paid employees and younger workers, who are among the worst hit by the #COVID19 #pandemic.

#AceDailyNews says according to BBC Business Report: National Living Wage set to rise to £9.50 an hour in the budget on Wednesday: This is a 6.6% increase in the minimum wage for all those aged 23 and over – more than twice the current 3.1% rise in the cost of living: It will take effect from 1 April next year.

Coffee shop worker

Chancellor Rishi Sunak said the increase “ensures we’re making work pay and keeps us on track to meet our target to end low pay by the end of this Parliament”. 

But Labour’s shadow chief secretary to the Treasury, Bridget Phillipson, described it as an “underwhelming offer” that would be mostly swallowed up by tax rises, universal credit cuts and higher energy bills.

Minimum pay rates for younger workers are also set to go up. 

The National Minimum Wage for people aged 21-22 will rise from £8.36 to £9.18 an hour and the Apprentice Rate increases from £4.30 to £4.81 an hour.

Minimum wage increases from 1 April:

  • National Living Wage for over-23s: From £8.91 to £9.50 an hour
  • National Minimum Wage for those aged 21-22: From £8.36 to £9.18
  • National Minimum Wage for 18 to 20-year-olds: From £6.56 to £6.83
  • National Minimum Wage for under-18s: From £4.62 to £4.81
  • The Apprentice Rate: From £4.30 to £4.81

The minimum wage that workers should get depends on their age and whether they are apprentices.

The National Minimum Wage is the minimum pay per hour to which almost all workers are entitled. 

The National Living Wage is higher than the National Minimum Wage. It applies to workers who are 23 or older.

Employers often worry that a higher minimum wage will lead to more unemployment, as they will be forced to lay off workers in order to afford the increases.

But independent experts maintain there has been little or no evidence of job losses as a result of rising minimum wage levels.

About half of the two million jobs paid at this level are in retail, hospitality, cleaning and maintenance. 

This time last year, there were concerns that hard-pressed small businesses would find it difficult to afford such rises. 

Firms are already saying price rises will be passed on to consumers, but this bit of inflationary pressure was mostly baked in to the system, says the BBC’s economics editor, Faisal Islam.

The government has already committed to put the National Living Wage on a pathway to well over £10 an hour, or more formally two-thirds of typical wages, and thus to “abolish in work poverty” by 2024, our editor adds.

He says the government will claim that this makes up for cuts to universal credit, but although the cash increase is impressive, much will be gobbled up by rising prices and it is not necessarily the same people in receipt of both.

Giving millions of workers a 6.6% pay rise sounds generous and will be a welcome boost to many pay packets.

It also follows the government’s – and particularly the prime minister’s – narrative of pushing towards a higher-wage economy.

Yet this would be no bumper pay day for low-income families.

They spend a higher proportion of income than others on heating and lighting their homes. Hefty gas and electricity bill rises, on top of recent increases this month, are inevitable in the spring. Prices in the shops are going up and many economists believe the increases could last longer than previously expected.

Finally, a National Living Wage rise is not compensation for welfare cuts, such as a removal of the £20-a-week universal credit uplift, as the Institute for Fiscal Studies has consistently pointed out. 

Not all of those receiving benefits are in work, and for low-income employees who are, a rise in wages can mean a reduction in their benefits.

The move comes as households face an economic squeeze from the soaring cost of energy and rising consumer prices.

The Bank of England’s chief economist, Huw Pill, has warned that UK inflation is likely to hit or surpass 5% by early next year, leading analysts to predict that interest rates could go up as early as next month.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak is also eager to begin balancing the books after the strain of financing pandemic emergency measures, with higher taxes likely to be in the offing.

Measures to trim public spending have already begun with the end of the £20-a-week temporary increase to universal credit payments, which was brought in at the start of the pandemic and withdrawn again earlier this month.

#AceNewsDesk report ………..Published: Oct.26: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#employment, #income, #london, #nlw, #wages

(LONDON) Employment & Inflation Report: Job vacancies in the U.K. hit a record high last month and wages soared by 7.4% between April & June, adding to fears of a prolonged period of rising prices as companies pass on higher costs to consumers #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Aug.18: There were a record 953,000 vacancies in the United Kingdom on average over the three months to July — 168,000 more than the first quarter of 2020 before coronavirus restrictions were introduced…

#AceDailyNews says that one million vacancies and soaring wages fuel UK inflation fears and the strong recovery in the labor market was highlighted in data published Tuesday by the Office for National Statistics and it could further fuel inflationary pressures in the UK economy. That could prompt the central bank to hike interest rates as early as May 2022, according to some economists.

For July alone, vacancies may have exceeded one million for the first time based on early survey figures, according to Jonathan Athow, ONS deputy national statistician for economic statistics.Vacancies in all industries increased, with arts, entertainment and recreation posting the fastest rate of growth following the lifting of all remaining social distancing restrictions in England on July 19.

Worker shortage is forcing UK businesses to close as Covid cases spike

“The world of work continues to rebound robustly from the effects of the pandemic,” Athow said in a statement.

The unemployment rate fell 0.2 percentage points to 4.7%, according to the ONS. Athow said that there were no signs of redundancies starting to pick up ahead of the end of the government’s furlough program, which supports wages, at the end of next month.

Worker shortages could place a drag on the recovery, however. Some pubs and grocery stores had to close last month because of the number of employees required to quarantine after coming into contact with someone who had tested positive for Covid-19. 

The UK government has since scrapped this rule for people who are fully vaccinated, but the impact of the pandemic and Brexit has meant fewer EU citizens to fill jobs in industries such as retail, farming and logistics.

“Although the changes to self-isolation rules will help, with many firms facing a more deep-rooted squeeze on labor supply from the impact of Covid and Brexit, staff shortages may persistently weigh on economic activity,” head of economics at the British Chambers of Commerce, Suren Thiru said in a statement on Tuesday.

Rising inflation concerns

There are already signs that a shortage of workers is placing upward pressure on wages. According to the ONS, growth in average total pay excluding bonuses was 7.4% in the three months to June compared with the same period in 2020. 

Even after stripping out factors such as the fall in the number of lower-paid jobs, the ONS data suggest that annual wage inflation was running between 3.5% and 4.9% in June, according to Berenberg senior economist Kallum Pickering.

“It remains well above the mere 2% average rate from 2009-2019,” Pickering wrote in a research note. “With unemployment falling from an already low level and labor demand surging to well past previous record highs, the risks to the wage growth outlook look skewed to the upside,” he added.

Rising wage pressures come as businesses are already contending with higher costs in their supply chains from raw materials shortages and soaring shipping rates. 

“Together, these factors point to further inflation pressures ahead as firms try to pass on cost rises to consumers,” Pickering said. 

The Bank of England said earlier this month that it expects inflation to rise even further above its 2% target in the coming months and that it will set interest rates to ensure inflation returns to that level.

“We continue to look for the first rate hike in August 2022. But the strengthening inflation dynamic and strong recovery in domestic demand suggest the risks are tilted towards a hike even sooner that — perhaps as early as May 2022,” Pickering added.

#AceNewsDesk report ……Published: Aug.18: 2021:

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

Editor says …Sterling Publishing & Media Service Agency is not responsible for the content of external site or from any reports, posts or links, and can also be found here on Telegram: https://t.me/acenewsdaily all of our posts fromTwitter can be found here: https://acetwitternews.wordpress.com/ and all wordpress and live posts and links here: https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#economy, #employment, #inflation, #london, #ons, #u-k-labour, #wages

(U.K) Court Report: Landmark Equal Pay Report: Thousands of current and former Tesco workers have won a legal argument in their fight for equal pay #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – June.05: The European Court of Justice has ruled that an EU law could be relied on in making equal pay claims against their employer.

Tesco staff win legal argument in equal pay fight for workers, mostly women, have argued that they failed to receive equal pay for work of equal value with colleagues in its distribution centres who are mostly men. Earlier this year, the Supreme Court ruled that Asda shop workers can compare their roles with those of their colleagues in distribution centre for the purposes of equal pay. This ruling mainly focused on the UK legal test for comparability and said this breached EU and UK laws.

23 hours ago

By Emma Simpson
Business correspondent, BBC News

Tesco store
ECJ Equal Pay Report

Tesco, the UK’s biggest retailer, and law firm Leigh Day, acting on behalf of the workers, sought clarification from the Court of Justice of the European Union. 

They asked the court to rule on a specific aspect of European law – whether the so-called “single source” test applies to businesses in the UK. 

Under EU law, a worker can be compared with somebody working in a different establishment if a “single source” has the power to correct the difference in pay. 

‘Time to accept’

According to Leigh Day, the latest decision reinforces the Supreme Court’s ruling and makes it extremely difficult for other supermarkets to argue the roles of shop workers cannot be compared with those of their colleagues in distribution centres. 

Kiran Dauka, a partner in the employment team at Leigh Day, said: “This judgement reinforces the Supreme Court’s ruling that the roles of shop floor workers can be compared to those of their colleagues in distribution centres for the purposes of equal pay. 

“For a long time, employers have argued that UK law in this area is unclear, but this judgment is simple: if there is a single body responsible for ensuring equality, the roles are comparable.

“Clarification from the CJEU confirms that this single source test can be relied upon by people in the UK bringing an equal value claim. This means that employers can no longer hide behind the grey areas of UK law.

“It’s time for supermarkets to accept that the roles of shop floor workers and distribution centre workers are comparable.” 

‘Uplifting’ decision

Pam Jenkins, who works at Tesco, said: “To get a judgement confirming shop floor workers can use an easier legal test to compare their jobs to male colleagues in distribution is uplifting.

“I’ve always been proud to work at Tesco, but knowing that male colleagues working in distribution centres are being paid more is demoralising.

“I’m hopeful that Tesco will recognise the contribution shop floor workers make to the business and reflect that in our pay.”

The legal test for comparability is only the first of three stages within Asda’s overall pay claim, which is expected to take several years to conclude. 

Leigh Day is also handing similar equal pay claims against Sainsbury’s, Tesco, Morrisons and Co-op, which are not as far advanced. 

A Tesco spokesperson said: “The jobs in our stores and distribution centres are different. These roles require different skills and demands which lead to variations in pay – but this has absolutely nothing to do with gender: We reward our colleagues fairly for the jobs they do and work hard to ensure that the pay and benefits we offer are fair, competitive and sustainable: These claims are extremely complex and will take many years to reach a conclusion. We continue to strongly defend these claims.”

#AceNewsDesk report ………Published: Jun.05: 2021:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#ecj, #u-k-equal-pay, #wages

(MANCHESTER, N.H.) US Dept Of Labor Report: Recovers245,351 in back wages for 117 employees of a greenhouse tomato grower in Madison, Maine, that failed to comply with federal laws governing wages and working conditions for agricultural temporary guest workers, U.S. workers and workers in corresponding employment #AceNewsDesk report

#AceNewsReport – Mar.31: Investigators determined Backyard Farms violated H-2A programrequirements when it made room for incoming foreign workers by dismissing U.S. workers it employed through temporary help agencies as de-leafers, pickers and packers. The grower also paid workers in corresponding employment lower wages than H-2A workers for performing the same work, which is prohibited by law. Additionally, Backyard Farms failed to offer employment to U.S. workers who worked in the same occupation the previous year, instead giving those positions to guest workers. The employer also failed to provide employees with copies of their work contracts, as required by law.

Maine tomato grower pays $337K in back wages, penalties after US Department of Labor investigation: ‘The Investigators with the department’s Wage and Hour Division found that Backyard Farms LLC violated the labor provisions of the H-2A Temporary Agricultural Visa Program and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act . In addition to the back wages, Backyard Farms paid $92,114 in civil money penalties for its violations’

http://ingstadmedia.com/knuj/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/11/Us-Department-of-Labor

Backyard Farms also violated the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act when it contracted with three temporary help agencies that were not farm labor contractors registered to perform MSPA-covered activities. 

“The U.S. Department of Labor continues to enforce the requirements of agricultural guest worker program to ensure employers do not terminate or fail to offer jobs to U.S. workers in favor of foreign workers, and do not pay any workers in corresponding employment less than their hard-earned wages,” said Wage and Hour Division District Director Daniel Cronin in Manchester, New Hampshire. “In this case, Backyard Farmsdismissed some U.S. workers and paid other workers lower wages than foreign workers for the same work. Employers that violate the requirements of the H-2A program can be assessed back wages and substantial penalties, and may be barred from participating in the H-2A program for up to 3 years.”

The division’s Northern New England District Office in Manchester conducted the investigation.

The Wage and Hour Division provides its Workers Owed Wages search tool to assist workers owed back wages. The division also provides employers with a range of compliance assistance materials and encourages all employers to contact their local office to speak confidentially with a wage and hour professional to discuss any questions they may have. For more information about the H-2A Temporary Agricultural Programand other laws enforced by the division, call 866-4US-WAGE (487-9243). 

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports by https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, also links can be found at here for Twitter and Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

#dol, #employment, #wages

‘ THE POOR GETTING PUNISHED ‘

AceFriendsNews – November 18 – Poor Getting Punished. 

index

The headlines today : people working for minimal wages are getting € 10.00 less each month

(if your rated between 1000 and 1300 euro).

New tax laws !!!!

10-euro-e1412174695319

That is $ 12.496 dollar U.S.

The poverty line in Europe is € 1250.00

On welfare you get € 951,64 each month …..?  

Landlord-Guide-Eviction-Process

Its gonna get crowded in the streets that is for sure. If my name was Mark Rutte prime minister of Holland l would be deeply ashamed.

· · in fotografie.

 Source: 

#ANS2014

#dollar, #euro, #eviction, #laws, #poor, #poverty, #punished, #tax, #wages